Type: Trad, 4 pitches, Grade III
FA: Burgette and Erickson, 1970
Page Views: 115,459 total · 527/month
Shared By: Ben Folsom on Oct 23, 2001
Admins: slim, Andrew Gram, Nathan Fisher, Perin Blanchard, grk10vq

You & This Route


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Access Issue: RAIN, WET ROCK and RAPTOR CLOSURES: The sandstone around Moab is fragile and is very easily damaged when it is wet. Also please ask and be aware of Raptor Closures in areas such as CAT WALL and RESERVOIR WALL in Indian Creek Details
Access Issue: Registration required for camping starting 01 Oct 2010. Details

Description

This is probably the easiest route on Castleton, and is a fantastic climb. To reach, hike up the talus as for the Kor-Ingalls, when you reach the base, walk around to the north end of the tower and traverse out on a ledge to the base of the chimney which is right on the left hand corner of the North Face.

P1- Climb the double hand cracks in the corner. This pitch is intimidating, but there are many rests. The crux of the pitch is at the top where you climb over a short bulge, and then up to a small ledge to the belay.

P2- Climb a short but tricky 5.8 offwidth protected by an old bolt. Place a big cam here instead of clipping the useless bolt. Then climb the chimney above climbing over chockstones and varied cracks to a belay on a small ledge. The belay takes hand size cams.

P3- Climb up the hand crack up to a stemming move at the top of the chimney which gets you to a ledge. Climb up easy ground to a ledge where you join the Kor Ingalls.

P4- Climb the last pitch of the Kor Ingalls to the top.

To descend rappel the North Face via three raps or the Kor Ingalls via 4 raps.

Protection

Three sets of cams to #3 Camalot, 1 bigger cam for pitch 2. A set of stoppers.

The Bolt

If you tell yourself "the
The bolt protecting the offwidth on P2. Photo shot on 10/24/11. will catch me", you are putting yourself at great risk of falling to a ledge, hitting your belayer and breaking her arm, falling off her and factor 1.5-ing the anchor and leaving a bloody mess dripping down the first pitch and onto the party following you.

You will then rap off, get your rope stuck, and walk painfully and dejectedly, on the ankle that you realize is broken, to the parking area and then be subjected to the crass old nurse with the thick glasses in the Moab Emergency Room (which is hard to find).

Then you get billed and have to schedule that surgery on your ankle, which won't work.

SO—Take a large cam and use it. Seriously, its not much to carry and it's an almost necessary piece for tower climbing in the desert. No reason for you to not have it here except laziness and poverty, and poverty doesn't really count in this situ. (Try paying off the emergency room visit instead? Me thinks not.)

As an addition, again, there is no plan to replace this bolt and there shouldn't be. The first ascentionist, Dan Burgeutte, did the route without the bolt and has asked that it not be replaced. As there is protection that protects the move (you are even toproping with the piece!) it would be silly and against the generally accepted ethics of climbers to replace the bolt. Carry the #5.

—Sam Lightner, Jr.

Photos