Type: Trad, Alpine, 3 pitches, Grade IV
FA: Roger Dalke & Wayne Goss, 1967, FFA Duncan Ferguson & Lisa Schassberger late '70s or early '80s
Page Views: 19,252 total · 82/month
Shared By: Kishen Mangat on Jul 6, 2001
Admins: Leo Paik, John McNamee, Frances Fierst, Monty, Monomaniac, Tyler KC

You & This Route


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Access Issue: Seasonal Closures Details

Description

From Broadway ledge, follow the first two pitches of D7 or the Yellow Wall to Crossover Ledge. From here, the first pitch of the Black Dagger will become evident as the shallow, left-facing corner.

P1. Climb up the steep dihedral until you reach a splitter hand crack (thin hands). The crack widens to 4" for a series of exhilarating moves then returns to thin hands. 5.11a. 160 feet.

P2. Begin with steep finger jams. After 30 feet, you will reach the base of the Black Dagger chimney (this is the obvious, dagger-shaped chimney visible from Chasm Lake - and I-25 for that matter). The crux is grunting your way through a squeeze / slot that leads from the splitter crack below to the elevator shaft / chimney above (5.11a). The 80-foot chimney is enjoyable 5.7 when dry, but reputed to be wet at times. Belay at the top of the chimney below a large, ominous roof.

P3. Begin by exiting the Black Dagger chimney via the looming roof overhead. Stem your way to the edge of the roof (you will need double-long runners on any protection below the roof). Pull the roof and kick your feet out onto the face - very exciting! Above the roof, you will want a directional as the rope easily becomes stuck in the roof. There are two options from here - straight up is 5.11a OW with a bolt. Otherwise, traverse right about six feet and follow an incipient hand crack for 80 feet. Traverse left approximately 20 feet to Almost Table Ledge.

Rappel to Broadway.

Protection

Rack to #4 Camalot, doubles or triples helpful especially in the #0.5 - #2 range.

Photos