Type: Trad, Alpine, 800 ft, 7 pitches, Grade III
FA: Mike Roybal, Peter Prandoni, 1975
Page Views: 10,846 total · 71/month
Shared By: Chuck McQuade on Jan 1, 2007
Admins: Jason Halladay, Anthony Stout, LeeAB Brinckerhoff, Marta Reece, Drew Chojnowski

You & This Route


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Description

A long time classic in the Sandias offering some of the cleanest crack and face climbing in the area. Also a great test of route finding skills.

P1: (5.7) Begin climbing dihedral, at the end of the dihedral move left through easier ground up to a dirt ledge with many large blocks.

P2: (5.9) Move slightly right and climb an arching roof. Turn the roof and angle right to a small sloping ledge under a small roof.

P3: (5.7) Traverse out right below the small roof. Begin angling right towards the corner of the huge roof in the center of the Muralla Grande. A belay can be set here or run together with P4 using a 60m rope.

P4: (5.8) Climb the beautiful dihedral passing the huge roof on the right, ending at a 2-bolt anchor below a bulge on a small ledge.

P5: (5.9 R) A long traverse out left to the end of the ledge. Place gear here to protect your second. Next climb a small right-trending crack. You eventually meet up with the finger tip crack above your belay, however had this point it has widened out allowing for a much needed piece of gear. Follow the crack a bit further, then angle out right onto the face, ending at a sloping ledge with a bolted belay.

P6: (5.8) Face climb past a piton, tend right to a short offwidth section, continuing to a fun dihedral. End on a grassy sloping ledge.

P7: (5.6) Easy but loose climbing in either chimney system above.

Location

The route starts under the large roof in the center of the Muralla Grande, begin climbing in a dihedral. The undercling roof of pitch-2 can barely be seen from the ground.

Protection

Standard rack to a #4 Camalot, many long slings for traversing pitches

Photos