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Are all "good" climbers able to slackline?


Original Post
CMaloney · · Colorado Springs, CO · Joined Dec 2011 · Points: 0

Dumb question but genuinely curious.  If you climb 5.11 and up, is slacklining easy for you?  

Lena chita · · OH · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 745

If you climb 5.11 and up, is juggling easy for you? How about swing dancing?

Eric Engberg · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2009 · Points: 0

Probably a bit more correlation then Lena would imply - but not really that much.  Especially at a relatively modest 5.11 threshold.   If you changed it to V11 I suspect you would get more of a correlation.  But is it because of the physical attibutes of the person or the mental mindset? 

Benandstuff · · Winston-Salem, NC · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 571

There's no need to be passive aggressive. I have wondered the same thing sometimes because "balance" is often touted as a necessary climbing skill and balance is obviously central to slacklining. It only sounds logical to connect the two.

I don't think there really is much overlap though. Balancing on a swaying, flexible, wide surface is much different than pinpointing a tiny immobile foot jib and balancing around that. Moreover, "balancing" on rock is more about maintaining body tension between points of contact, as opposed to slacklining which has your feet as the only points of contact (usually).

the schmuck · · Albuquerque, NM · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 110

No, not easy (slack lining that is). I can reliably onsight mid 11 to 11+ as long as it is not friction or crack. I am also the worlds worst slack liner, like truly the worst (no exaggeration...really).  But then again, 5.11 or even 5.12 is not really hard at all. 

As for what makes a decent rock climber, I think that you need to be able to consistently onsight at least 11c across ALL disciplines.  I am not a decent rock climber btw. 

Big B · · Sin City, NV · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 1
Lena chita wrote:

If you climb 5.11 and up, is juggling easy for you? How about swing dancing?

micro-aggression 

C Archibolt · · Salt Lake City, UT · Joined Apr 2012 · Points: 871

I've onsighted and redpointed 5.11s and I cannot slack line. 

Max Tepfer · · Bend, OR · Joined Oct 2007 · Points: 1,645
CMaloney wrote:

Dumb question but genuinely curious.  If you climb 5.11 and up, is slacklining easy for you?  

No.

the schmuck · · Albuquerque, NM · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 110
Tim Lutz wrote:

 so not fidling with placing gear on lead make you less of a climber?

No, you just need to be well rounded. Hard sport starts at 8a, or 13b anyway. So I'd say that if for example you climb 13b sport, 12 trad (not pure crack), 12- cracks, 11+ offwidth, 11+ friction slab, and boulder v8, then you are a decent climber...for example. 

Mobes Mobesely · · Granite island · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 865
Tim Lutz wrote:

 so not fidling with placing gear on lead make you less of a climber?

Yes of course, even less if you wrestle pebbles regularly. 

James Xu · · 2005 Ford E-150 · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 155

I hang out with a lot of really talented slackliners, and I noticed that the 'best' slackliners either have a really strong climbing background (easily climbing 5.10-5.13) or aren't even rock climbers at all.

Like Eric said above, I think there are some correlations between rock climbing and slacklining with certain physical attributes (having shoulder/core endurance, being able to climb the leash back to the top of the line, etc.), but it especially correlates with the mental mindset aspect (extreme exposure, dealing with falling/failure, etc). I think there are also a lot of similarities between climbing and slacklining to the mind game when it comes to first learning (both can be hard as hell to start learning) and also with soloing.

But to answer your question, for me personally it's yes.

James Xu · · 2005 Ford E-150 · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 155

That being said, nowadays a lot of the slackline/highline world record holders and 'pros' for the most part are purely slackliners, as in they put most of their time into slacklining and barely climb, if at all. 

Long story short: You don't need to be a climber to become a crusher slackliner, but it can help(?).

Muscrat · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 3,610

No, but hacky sack is.

Aleks Zebastian · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 175

climbing friend,

no.

no grown man or woman should slackline, much like the "hackey sack"

Lena chita · · OH · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 745
Eric Engberg wrote:

Probably a bit more correlation then Lena would imply - but not really that much.  Especially at a relatively modest 5.11 threshold.   If you changed it to V11 I suspect you would get more of a correlation.  But is it because of the physical attibutes of the person or the mental mindset? 

I don't think there is much of a correlation even at higher climbing abilities. I know people who do amazing things on slackline, and can't climb a 5.10. I know 5.14 climbers who can't walk from one end of the slackline to the other. Though I am sure they would be able to do it after a short period of time, if they worked on it.

I was a middling-to-poor slackliner when I had it set up in my backyard. I was at that point climbing 5.12, but I couldn't walk across the slackline when I first tried. Obviously got better at it when I started doing it regularly. But it had no effect on my climbing ability, in case you are wondering. I haven't tried slacklining for several years, and I expect that i would fall on my face if I try.

My daughter was a gymnast. She could do things on a balance beam I don't want to even try on the padded floor. She couldn't walk across the slackline unassisted when she first tried, at the same time that she was doing cartwheels, handstands and backflips on the beam.

Greg D · · Here · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 867
Tim Lutz wrote:

 so not fidling with placing gear on lead make you less of a climber?

Yes.


Isn't it obvious that if someone can do everything you can do plus fiddle with gear on lead, they have more skills than you?

Greg D · · Here · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 867
Greg D wrote:

Yes.


Isn't it obvious that if someone can do everything you can do plus fiddle with gear on lead, they have more skills than you?

Macro agression!

the schmuck · · Albuquerque, NM · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 110
Tim Lutz wrote:

I am glad you have a fine idea of what makes a 'decent' climber.

I am not interested in placing gear in cracks, but some consider me to be 'decent' climber.  Placing gear has absolutely nothing to do with athleticism, it is a skill, like tying your shoes.  Your shoes then take you for a run, and that would be the athletecism.

I have a lot of friends that only boulder, but double-digits, so they are even less decent than I am?

Perhaps one can be a great specialist, but not a great climber?  Just a thought.  Anyway, enough with the thread drift (that I caused :-/)

Greg D · · Here · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 867
Tim Lutz wrote:

you have correctly identified it as a skill.  I don't care about that skill, just the athleticism required.

By your and Schmuck's logic, I'll take 'skills' to it's logical end:  Anyone who calls themself a decent climber also has to be good at steep hiking in the cold with a high risk of death, aka alpinism.  

If you aren't spooning for warmth on a ledge while sharing a toothbrush, your 5.11 gear lead on a chalk highway in IC with gear posted on MP is meaningless.


Still waiting for the logical part.  

JAtkinson · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2013 · Points: 916

i boulder double ds and cant slackline for shit

Aleks Zebastian · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 175
Greg D wrote:

Macro agression!

climbing friend,

another day, another wang slapped through tubes of internet!

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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