Mountain Project Logo

A better anchor ancronym/checklist?


David K · · New Paltz, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 145
caughtinside wrote:

No substitute for good judgment and experience. 

True, but the goal is to get them to survive long enough to get some experience.

Chris K · · Clemson · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 56

Efficient doesn’t just apply to saving time. That comes with practice. Efficiency comes with use of gear (I.e. Use the rope vs. 5 slings, 4 lockers, 3 pieces ) just like how solid should apply not to anchor itself but also the rock quality.

The acronym should be used as a second check to make sure the climber hit all the key areas of a strong anchor. If in a class, all items should be taught together with examples and/or packets with more detailed loading conditions (I.e. force vectors). No acronym is going to suffice. Just look at PEMDAS, people still don’t know how to use it.

 

David K · · New Paltz, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 145
Chris K wrote: Efficient doesn’t just apply to saving time. That comes with practice. Efficiency comes with use of gear (I.e. Use the rope vs. 5 slings, 4 lockers, 3 pieces ) just like how solid should apply not to anchor itself but also the rock quality.
True, but I think "simple" is clearer, i.e. won't encourage a beginner to rush.
Fernando Cal · · CA, UT · Joined Dec 2015 · Points: 5

Acronyms build a good foundation when learning and doing "ground school." With practice and feedback from experienced climbers, the acronyms eventually go away and become obsolete - unless you are trying to explain to someone new why your anchor is badass. No matter the acronym used, anchors will have compromises, which is where situational experience comes in.

Hobo Greg · · My Van · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 200

ABCDEF
Anchor Better Catch Da Extreme Fall

Fran M · · Germany · Joined Feb 2019 · Points: 0
Hobo Greg wrote: ABCDEF
Anchor Better Catch Da Extreme Fall

one acronym to rule thrm all!!

Rick.Krause Krause · · Madras, OR · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 233

People need to focus on good individual placements.
1.Rock Quality, Macro, Micro
2.Constriction, the bigger the better.
3.Nuts >50% contact with rock ; CAM < 50% closed
4.Unless you are using Totum cams or offset cams. Both lobe sets have the same expansion angle. I think this is the biggest cause of cam failure.

Things to think about.

1.Connecting anchor points together do not make them stronger or increase their holding power.
2.The bigger the mass the stronger the anchor system. (trees and rocks)
3.There is no such thing as equalizations and angle does not matter because you can NOT maintain true apex. So, one leg of a two-point anchor is ALWAYS taking more load. I propose that even > 90 degrees could be better, because you get a greater apex variance range, and that offsets any interior angle forces. You are less likely to put all the load on to one leg of the anchor system.
4.Unless you are anchoring on snow. Extensions do not happen. But limiting them cannot hurt just not that important.

Redundant is the key word.
Redundant of all components is essential. When I take a final evaluation of my anchor system. I ask if I CUT something is any think bad going to happen?

Efficient is also a key word.
Am I efficient with my time and materials? Misuse of time can lead to making mistakes, and misuse of materials can lead to taking shot cuts.

P- Placement
R- Redundant
E- Efficient

Darren Mabe · · Flagstaff, AZ · Joined Dec 2002 · Points: 3,940

Make Anchors Great Again

Harumpfster Boondoggle · · Between yesterday and today. · Joined Apr 2018 · Points: 148

Jim Titt said it: "Get strong (multi-directional) placements and tie yourself to them" in a redundant fashion.

FWIW all of the macrame fiddling just dont matter much.

Only experience will make you efficient after that.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

General Climbing
Post a Reply to "A better anchor ancronym/checklist?"

Log In to Reply