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Multiple Backpacks


Original Post
Gabe MountainProject · · Sacramento, CA · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 0

I mostly do 4th/easy 5th class mountains in the Sierras.

To date, I've been bringing a 65L pack to my high camp (around 11k feet), then using a 33L pack on summit day.  I realized that I'm carrying a 5.5 lb. pack and a 3 lb. pack, for a total 8.5 pounds of pack up to 11k feet, and back down.  

Anyone know of any solutions?  

I'm considering getting a 75L Mission BD pack and removing the hat on summit day.  Other than that, I'm out of ideas!

Thanks for the opinions,

Gabe

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530

Look into cilogear packs. I collapse my 40L pack down to 20L for summits when I take it into the backcountry. 

Gabe MountainProject · · Sacramento, CA · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 0

holy crap those aren't cheap!


http://www.cilogear.com/packs.html

Beean · · Canmore, AB · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 0

Pack a bit lighter and take a 45ish? Or just don't take your second bag. That way you won't have to carry it. 

Jason Todd · · Cody, WY · Joined Apr 2012 · Points: 1,119

I've used a BD Mission 50 for 8 day long Wind River climbing trips.  Marmot Kompressor for a summit pack, doubles as a great compression sack to fit everything in the bigger pack and only weighs a pound or so..

John Wilder · · Las Vegas, NV · Joined Feb 2004 · Points: 1,530

Gabe MountainProject wrote:

holy crap those aren't cheap!


http://www.cilogear.com/packs.html

Quality never is, nor should it be. 

My 40l will pack 60l and collapse to 20l, and it's crazy light and can be made lighter in the field when it's collapsed. 

that guy named seb · · Britland · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 205

How long are these trips? if they are longer than 4 days i would say lighten up your day pack to maybe a 20l something like the REI flash 18. Anything less i would say pack lighter and bring a 45L something like the arcteryx alpha 45 would work well for what your doing with it.

Gabe MountainProject · · Sacramento, CA · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 0

the trip is usually car camp 8k day 1, high camp 11k day 2, summit/hike out day 3.


the bear can rules in the Sierras really take up a lot of room in the packs!  Rope, crampons, harness, gear also takes its toll.  I don't think I can use less than 65!

Maxwell Dergosits · · San Francisco · Joined May 2017 · Points: 0

I have the BD mission 55 that weighs 3.88lbs, but for the summit you can take out the backplate, cushioned hip belt, and the brain to bring the pack down to <1.5lbs. The BD 55 can totally fit more like 70 if you use the whole neck.

that guy named seb · · Britland · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 205

Gabe MountainProject wrote:

the trip is usually car camp 8k day 1, high camp 11k day 2, summit/hike out day 3.


the bear can rules in the Sierras really take up a lot of room in the packs!  Rope, crampons, harness, gear also takes its toll.  I don't think I can use less than 65!

If a guide manages with a 40l and a change of clothes i think you can manage with a 45L.

Could you just list everything you pack? I really feel like the issue is what you are packing rather than the extra 3lbs back pack. I mean like with out the back panel and brain my 45 weighs just under 2 pounds So it already sounds like your packing heavier gear than you need to.

Josh Platt · · Boone, NC · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 35

If you do need to stick to a internal frame pack, check out ULA. I’ve tried hiking with climbing equipment in a frameless pack and that was miserable. But the ULA was a good compromise with weight.

https://www.ula-equipment.com

Also, not sure if you are a on backpackinglight.com but you may have some good suggestions there with lightening your overall load.

Graham Johnson · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 0

I really like this one: https://www.trekkinn.com/outdoor-mountain/salewa-vector-ul-22/1107082/p  It's super duper light (yes, it doesn't carry like a 3 lb pack would) but it carries everything you need for a summit bid, pretty durable and did I mention it weighs sweet fuck all? Oh and cheap.  I used a Sea to summit one: https://www.rei.com/product/867165/sea-to-summit-ultra-sil-daypack for many years but it's not nearly as comfortable as the salewa. 

Goran Lynch · · Oakland, CA · Joined Jul 2008 · Points: 8

With judicious packing, a 40-50L pack should be ample for a 3 day trip with climbing gear, especially if you're not carrying a huge rack (i.e. prepared for new-routing or carrying multiple size 4+ cams). As others have said, "needing" more space means that you're probably over-packed. If you pack less and strap the rope over the top of the pack, you can fit it all in something like a BD Speed 40, Arcteryx alpha fl 45, Cilo 30:30, Hyperlite Mountain Gear 3400, and then readily climb moderate terrain with the same pack. 

For routes that are technically demanding and demand a light and low-profile pack, stashing something like a Kompressor (snow) or Cilo 20L (rock) works well, but it sounds like you're stashing a 3lbs 30L pack. That's a HUGE climbing pack if you're not bringing bivy gear. You'd save 6.5lbs from your system and a ton of bulk if you managed to bring a single Arcteryx alpha fl45 or cilogear 30:30 instead of the two packs you've got now.


FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275

If the OP is getting all his gear for three days in his 65L pack, including a rope, harness, shoes, stove, small tent and a bear canister, he is packing well. A 40L pack isn't going to work, unless you're strapping stuff to the outside of the pack, which is a practice I avoid.

that guy named seb · · Britland · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 205

FrankPS wrote:

If the OP is getting all his gear for three days in his 65L pack, including a rope, harness, shoes, small tent and a bear canister, he is packing well. A 40L pack isn't going to work, unless you're strapping stuff to the outside of the pack, which is a practice I avoid.

The only thing he needs to strap to the outside is the rope and helmet, it's hardly a shit show.

mark felber · · Wheat Ridge, CO · Joined Jul 2005 · Points: 28

33 liters sounds awfully big for a summit pack. If you really want to use two packs, try to pare down your summit load to where it will fit in something like an REI Flash 22. It sounds like you could benefit from going through your whole backcountry setup and figuring out what you really ned and use, what you can live without, and what you can afford to replace with a lighter equivalent.

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275

that guy named seb wrote:

The only thing he needs to strap to the outside is the rope and helmet, it's hardly a shit show.

I'd still like to see everything else fit into a 40L pack. Have you seen how bulky a bear canister is? Even the Bear Vault Solo is large.

Ryan Hill · · Oakland, CA · Joined Dec 2009 · Points: 30

I'm a big fan of my CiloGear pack.  I picked up a 3030 WorkSack last summer and have brought it on a number of trips.  With judicious packing it has replaced my 65L Arc'teryx, my running vest/pack, and my BD Bullet approach pack.  I filled it out for 8 days in Banff (no technical climbing), compressed it for trail runs and single day summits in the Sierras, have done 3-day fall/winter trips in it, and used it for approaches to big climbs in Red Rocks.  If you are carrying summer gear it will definitely do 3 days of Sierra climbing.  

I would look at what you are carrying and how you are carrying it.  The rope can easily take up half of a backpack if it is too big.  Are you carrying a 70m 10.2 for alpine climbs?  Can you drop it down to a 30m 8.1?  What size is the tent you are carrying?  Do you need a tent in the summer?  Bring a light tarp instead?  What type of food/stove system are you bringing?  Simplify the menu, get rid of the frying pan, and drop weight/volume.  

Start minimizing your gear and it will be easy to fit three days of gear into a smaller pack.  You'll also move fast enough that your 3 day trip will become a quick overnight or a day trip.  


Locals Only · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 1,110

We should have a response for trust fund kids, and a different one for the rest of us.


Best advice is:  Unless this is your first year of "mountaineering" (and thus you have an excuse) you need to trim that 65 liter down bigtime.  No cast iron pots, for example.

mark felber · · Wheat Ridge, CO · Joined Jul 2005 · Points: 28

Bear canisters are huge, and they don't pack well, but careful packing will make a difference. From the OP's description of his activities, he seems to need food for one night (and maybe a second dinner, presumably for himself and his partner. One dinner, one lunch and the summit day's food for two people should fit into a small Bear Vault with room for a compact cooking/eating setup. With careful packing, it really looks like the OP could get his load down to a 50 liter main pack and a Flash 22 or similar for summit day. I'd like to see the OP's gear list, but it sounds like he's got room to condense and lighten his load quite a bit without sacrificing too much comfort and safety.

Gabe MountainProject · · Sacramento, CA · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 0

that guy named seb wrote:

If a guide manages with a 40l and a change of clothes i think you can manage with a 45L.

Could you just list everything you pack? I really feel like the issue is what you are packing rather than the extra 3lbs back pack. I mean like with out the back panel and brain my 45 weighs just under 2 pounds So it already sounds like your packing heavier gear than you need to.

In 65L, i'm only getting the following:

Tent: Direck2

Sleeping bag: down 15 degree rated Mountain Hardwear

Bear Can- I person can (req'd) and containing all food for the trip.  Also containing scented items (tooth paste, sunscreen tiny bottle, summit beer, baby wipes)

Sleeping pad on bottom of pack, strapped to outside.

MSR whisperlite with 20 oz tank (i know i could use a smaller tank) and a small pot.

100 oz camelbak and supplemental 50 liter bottle looped to outside of pack.

Clothes- what i'm wearing plus base layer bottom, small gloves, extra pair of socks, down jacket, beanie.

Crampons inside bag, gaitors inside bag, mountaineering axe on the outside.

Small items: 2 head lamps, compass, iodine tabs, lighter x 2, ear plugs, extra shoe laces, flint, spoon, mug (dangles on outside), toe warmer packets

Go pro in my pocket + 3 batteries.  Phone in my pocket.



That's it.  I feel like it's a really judicious set-up.  I can bring rope looped over the top, harness and a light rack with some rock shoes if the mission necessitates, but that's no always the case.

I'm really intrigued by those "strip downable packs" like the Ciro and the BD Mission the gentlemen above mentioned....



Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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