Climbing rope


Original Post
Jaredsup Suppo · · Donora · Joined May 2016 · Points: 0

I bought my first climbing rope it's a edelrid 9.7 drt rapter (anniversary rope) and it just came in the mail today and on the rope package it says what it should be used for and toprope isn't one of them would this because it's a 9.7 and not thicker ? I'm sure it would be fine but just wondering and also would lead climbing then top roping from the top be fine?

apoet · · AZ · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 183

Yes, it will be fine for leading and top roping.

Mathias · · Loveland, CO · Joined Jun 2014 · Points: 120

It's fine to top rope on. In certain situations top roping can cause a lot of drag across the rock, abrading the rope sheath. Thinner ropes generally have thinner sheaths and so can take less of this sort of "abuse". But the rope will still function just fine for top rope setups.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

Just remember: climbing ropes are dynamic, meaning they will stretch under load. If you're used to static gym ropes, you might notice you'll fall a bit further than usual, so be careful at the beginning of the climb.

Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 438
Ted Pinson wrote:Just remember: climbing ropes are dynamic, meaning they will stretch under load. If you're used to static gym ropes, you might notice you'll fall a bit further than usual, so be careful at the beginning of the climb.
When in doubt with a cruxy start have the belayer jump take and get the initial stretch out of the rope. A bit of a tug up on the harness to start sure beats bruising your heel on a stupid TR.
Jaredsup Suppo · · Donora · Joined May 2016 · Points: 0

Thanks everyone for the information I really appreciate it also when you reach the top of a lead climb are there usually 2 clips to hook your quick draws or locking carabeeners up or do you use the last clip and the second to last clip to atlest have 2 points ?

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 15
Jared Suppo wrote:Thanks everyone for the information I really appreciate it also when you reach the top of a lead climb are there usually 2 clips to hook your quick draws or locking carabeeners up or do you use the last clip and the second to last clip to atlest have 2 points ?
Jared, do you have an experienced person to learn with? That would be very helpful and safer.
Joe Garibay · · Ventura, Ca · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 45

I agree with frank. Quick draws don't always work. There are many ways to set an anchor depending on what you're working with.

Ted Pinson · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 45

Oh boy...

Jaredsup Suppo · · Donora · Joined May 2016 · Points: 0

I do not other then my buddy who now lives in Philly and I live by Pittsburgh and I go to a climbing gym but the people I talked to there don't seem to climb outside really.its just me and my girlfriend and I obviously want to do it safe I know I don't have to use quick draws and a locking carabeener is safer and a anchor for 3 points of contact but I was wondering what most people do to Toprope from a sport climb

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 15
Jared Suppo wrote:I do not other then my buddy who now lives in Philly and I live by Pittsburgh and I go to a climbing gym but the people I talked to there don't seem to climb outside really.its just me and my girlfriend and I obviously want to do it safe I know I don't have to use quick draws and a locking carabeener is safer and a anchor for 3 points of contact but I was wondering what most people do to Toprope from a sport climb
I highly recommend you learn from an experienced outdoor climber before you go by yourself. Don't get yourself or your girlfriend killed.

If you don't know someone, wait until you do. Find a climbing meetup group. Hire a guide for a day. Meet someone at your gym. Don't rush it.

Over and out!
Old lady H · · Boise, Idaho · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 120

What most beginners do to top rope from a sport climb is get a rope gun to lead it. Me, included!

Edit to add: see if you have an outdoor program at a local university, that takes folks out, and/or local gym doing same.

Tapawingo Markey · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 0

Or post in the MP Partner finding to see if there is someone local willing to take you out.

Jaredsup Suppo · · Donora · Joined May 2016 · Points: 0

I understand I need a mentor I posted about one yesterday but got 0 bites so far it's not like there's 10000s of climbers around my area and I'm in the gas/oil field so my schedule is crazy and it's hard to know when im off and super hard to get off on certain days. sometimes you just have to go out and learn it your self ive leadclimbed but only inside and unsure what to expect at the top of an outdoor lead climb that's why I'm asking this question so I know what to expect when I get to the top and can top rope it after. this queation is under beginner climbers anyone that can help with this answer other then saying get a mentor
would be greatly appreciated.

Trevor. · · Boise, ID · Joined Apr 2012 · Points: 741

If you're going to go the 'wing it and teach yourself' method(which I did and somehow managed to survive), at least get some climbing instructional books and read them cover to cover. I generally recommend Rock Climbing: Mastering Basic Skills as a fairly comprehensive beginner text. Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills is great and I also recommend it, although it goes way beyond the scope of what you need to know to start rock climbing.

As for your question, I usually just top rope sport climbs through two standard quick draws but some anchors are not ideal for that. Sometime I'll TR through extended alpine draws, sometimes I'll throw lockers into the mix, sometimes I'll tie a cordelette and use lockers, sometime I'll rig with static line, etc. Its very situational, and it takes some nuance and experience to know what the best way to rig an anchor is. This is where a mentor, a day with a guide, or at the bare minimum, a lot of reading come in.

Generally speaking though, most sport climbs are fine to TR off two non-locking quick draws at the top anchor. That said, at your experience level, a few lockers thrown into the mix for a bit of extra safety margin aren't going to hurt.

Jason Todd · · Cody, WY · Joined Apr 2012 · Points: 643
Jared Suppo wrote: sometimes you just have to go out and learn it your self ....this queation is under beginner climbers anyone that can help with this answer other then saying get a mentor would be greatly appreciated.
There are certain things in life, climbing being one of them, that are fatally unforgiving when mistakes happen. The reluctance by anyone to give you advice beyond "get a mentor" is due in part that no one wants to feel in any way responsible for your demise.

The best advice has been given. Find a time that fits your schedule and hire a guide for a day or two. Cheaper than an ER bill or the alternative.

Edit:
Trevor Thornton wrote:If you're going to go the 'wing it and teach yourself' method(which I did and somehow managed to survive), at least get some climbing instructional books and read them cover to cover. I generally recommend Rock Climbing: Mastering Basic Skills as a fairly comprehensive beginner text. Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills is great and I also recommend it, although it goes way beyond the scope of what you need to know to start rock climbing.
This is the next best piece advice.
Old lady H · · Boise, Idaho · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 120
Jared Suppo wrote:I understand I need a mentor I posted about one yesterday but got 0 bites so far it's not like there's 10000s of climbers around my area and I'm in the gas/oil field so my schedule is crazy and it's hard to know when im off and super hard to get off on certain days. sometimes you just have to go out and learn it your self ive leadclimbed but only inside and unsure what to expect at the top of an outdoor lead climb that's why I'm asking this question so I know what to expect when I get to the top and can top rope it after. this queation is under beginner climbers anyone that can help with this answer other then saying get a mentor would be greatly appreciated.
Hey, you sound like a go getter, hope someone comes through for you!

Does your gym let you place your own draws? Clean the anchors? Set up an anchor? Rappell? Ascend the ropes?

My son and I are self taught, but we learned ALL of this before being out for real. These are actually pretty nice folks on here, who care what happens to fellow climbers. Outside is just not the same, no matter how well you climb. I'm a pitifully bad climber, but a safe one!

And, STEP UP TO THE PLATE, guys!!! There are too many people asking nicely for our help, and too many posts with 0 responses.
Jaredsup Suppo · · Donora · Joined May 2016 · Points: 0

I appreciate the info video and your comment Jason I will look into ordering those books and old lady thank you for understanding that yes a mentor is a great thing to have but not everyone can find one and it is possible to teach your self with videos and books and questions with a good solid answer instead of the your a noob get mentor when it's in a beginner section. Oldlady no anchoring classes other then videos on youtube and yes there are already quickdraws connected or you can use your own as you go so I have the clipping part down i was really jist unsure what to expect when i get to the top to be able to safley hook up and toprope and I feel I'm some what of a solid indoor climber as of now I climb mostly v4 and some v5s and just eager for this rain to pass to hit the real rocks and know what to expect once I get in the position

Old lady H · · Boise, Idaho · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 120

No, you don't wait for the rain, you haul all your crap out, set up on the bathroom towel bar while sitting on the throne (or where ever), and practice. Lots. Set up an anchor (draws don't always work), clean an anchor with the idea of lowering, clean an anchor with the idea of rappelling, do it over and over. Set up your phone and make a video. Critique it. Kick yourself in the butt. Repeat.

THEN go find something you can rig to that will take your weight, only a dinky bit off the ground, and practice some more.

Do this EVEN IF, someone offers to take you out, because YOU have to judge if that person is an idiot.

Please??

Jaredsup Suppo · · Donora · Joined May 2016 · Points: 0

That's a awesome idea Oldlady!! I will deffinitly practice that way thank you so much

Jack Servedio · · Raleigh,NC · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 15
Old lady H wrote:No, you don't wait for the rain, you haul all your crap out, set up on the bathroom towel bar while sitting on the throne (or where ever), and practice. Lots. Set up an anchor (draws don't always work), clean an anchor with the idea of lowering, clean an anchor with the idea of rappelling, do it over and over. Set up your phone and make a video. Critique it. Kick yourself in the butt. Repeat. THEN go find something you can rig to that will take your weight, only a dinky bit off the ground, and practice some more. Do this EVEN IF, someone offers to take you out, because YOU have to judge if that person is an idiot. Please??
This is great advice!

OP let me start by saying, if you have to ask these basic questions on a forum, you are certainly not ready and you need to start studying. However, you can definitely learn yourself and just go out and do it, I did - but you better know your shit before you do it or you stand a good chance of getting hurt or dying. Practice, practice, and more practice before you ever leave the ground. Know every system backward and forwards, blindfolded. Triple check everything and when a couple draws will do on two bolts for your TR, use a quad with lockers on the bolts and two lockers for your masterpoint.

A $25 doorframe pullup bar from Target ended up being the best training tool I own. I can hang it up in the dark, put on my rack and some extra weight, and practice everything suspended. If you can get your systems down while you are suspended and in the dark quickly and efficiently, you are ready to test them on a 5.easy single pitch in daylight with good weather and access to the top anchors by walking without rappelling.

If you can afford it, take a trip to the Gunks where you are pretty much guaranteed to be able to spend a day out with some crusty old hardman who can teach you how not to die.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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