Elevation: 871 ft
GPS: 40.573, -77.845 Google Map · Climbing Area Map
Page Views: 2,059 total · 47/month
Shared By: I F on Apr 27, 2018 · Updates
Admins: SCPC, SWPACC, EPAC, Justin Johnsen
Access Issue: Avoid private land on approach to public areas Details
Access Issue: Private property adjacent to ridge Details

Description

This area of Hunter's is not well-explored or -documented. It is the northern extension of Rocky Ridge that lies on your left when you bear right to head towards the main Hunter's areas. There are no trails, but unless it's the dead of summer the underbrush isn't too bad. Most of the rock here is dirty and in need of cleaning. The rock is less densely spaced than at the main Hunter's area, and there are sections of stratified sandstone that are too loose to climb on. However, if you're willing to do a little exploring and some cleaning there are quality boulder problems to be had along the ridge.

Getting There

Park along Martin Gap Road where there is space for a pulloff and then go straight up the ridge to the left of the road. Coordinate for sub-area are where I chose to park.

Bat Conservation | How You Can Help

See a Bat on a Route, Give Us a Shout! 

Hey climbers, Ken Hull here with South Central PA Climbers. I’m working with Rob Schorr to help him spread the word about his bat research. Here’s a message from him about this important work and how, we as climbers, can help.

Climbers for Bat Conservation is working with climbers to understand bat ecology and why bats choose certain cracks and flakes. We’re a collaboration between climbers, bat biologists, and land managers to understand where bats roost and where large populations may reside. We are interested in finding bats because of a new disease called white-nose syndrome (whitenosesyndrome.org) which has killed millions of bats in North America. This collaboration has identified bat roosts throughout the U.S., and as far away as Norway and Bulgaria. CBC was developed by biologists who climb and they are advocates for climbing access and bat conservation.

So, if you see bats while climbing, please let us know by emailing us at climbersforbats@colostate.edu, or visiting our website to learn more. climbersforbats.colostate.edu.

Thank You!
Rob Schorr

Zoologist, Colorado Natural Heritage Program (warnercnr.colostate.edu/rschorr/)
Director, Climbers for Bat Conservation
Robert.schorr@colostate.edu

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