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Five Ten Access (approach shoe)
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Jun 26, 2016
I love my Canvas Guide Tennies, but they're due for replacement soon. I recently learned about Five Ten's new "Access" shoe via the climbing.com link below. Does anybody have experience with it yet? I'd be interesting in hearing any input.

One thing I'm wondering about is how their S1 rubber compares to C4 rubber used on the Guide Tennie.

climbing.com/gear/review-our-t...

fiveten.com/us/access-mesh-gre...
michaelp
Joined Apr 28, 2013
73 points
Jun 26, 2016
I don't have the guide tennies but I tried them on years ago and they seemed too narrow but I took the plunge and bought these. I used them while I set up top ropes in guiding situations. The S1 sticks really well on the top of granite slabs. They are super breathable and I know I could climb upwards of 5.10 in them. Here are my complaints though...

They are going to wear out fast. The mesh materials seem pretty weak and I don't expect them to last the whole summer.

Not wide enough. I got them because on the pictures they look wider than the guide tennie but they are still not wide enough for my duck feet. They are wide overall but they also have a pointed toe so my pinky toe gets a little crunched.

So far I'm happy with them but I only use them for the guide days I'm setting up top ropes and because of the pointed toes I don't think I would get them again.

Eric
Eric K
From Washington
Joined Aug 15, 2010
54 points
Jun 26, 2016
Thanks, Eric! That's exactly the sort of information I'm looking to hear. michaelp
Joined Apr 28, 2013
73 points
Jun 27, 2016
I'm wearing them right now. I echo a lot of what Eric said. I have fairly narrow feet and find the toebox to be perfect for me. The instep is surprisingly snug though. Fine for me, but might be too tight for anyone with wide feet. The sole is sticky and I like the flex in the forefoot, but if you like the stiffness in the Guide Tennies you'll miss it in the Access. The Guide Tennies are my favorite for Aid climbing, the Access probably isn't going to be quite as good there. I have the leather version and they seem like they'll be fairly durable, but again, probably not as durable as the Guide Tennies. Good shoes, just different than the Guide Tennies you're used to. Ryan Hamilton
From Orem
Joined Aug 11, 2011
34 points
Jun 27, 2016
Thanks, Ryan! The information about how they compare to Guide Tennies is super helpful. michaelp
Joined Apr 28, 2013
73 points
Jun 27, 2016
if mesh durability is a concern over breathability, you may want to check the leather version. ive had a pair for a month and a half, wearing them daily...beating them up in leavenworth to and from the boulders... not just buffed trails. while carrying lots of heavy foam, they provide good support and protection is fine. the rubber is sticky and durable. i have not seen any blowouts in the mesh. no real wear issues at all actually.

while cruising around town, i think the shoes are super comfy and look good. i like the mesh as its hot here in the summer.

have you looked into the ascent? mixed mesh and suede, a little wider, super sticky rubber, etc.
Stealthy
Joined Apr 4, 2013
609 points
Jun 27, 2016
Thanks for sharing your experience and suggestions, Stealthy.

I failed to mention it above, but I usually try to minimize purchase of leather items when possible. (Though I love my Evolv Shamans enough to keep buying them with their leather footbed.)
michaelp
Joined Apr 28, 2013
73 points
Administrator
Jun 28, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: Mastigouche
After trying out the Guide Tennies, I ended up getting the 5.10 Aescent.
I was split between 2 sizes in the Tennies, the Aescent were just right, they're also lighter and much cooler.
I'm probably going to buy a second pair since they may not survive 2 seasons since I'm also using them for XC MTB on flats with crampons...
Luc
From Montreal, Quebec
Joined Nov 27, 2006
8,841 points
Jun 29, 2016
Thanks for the reply, Luc.

By the way, in case anybody else curious, here is what Five Ten said about the difference in the rubbers.

The S1 rubber provides unparalleled grip on wet/dry surfaces, adding superior grip with rugged durability, and having a balance of stability and flexibility. Also shock absorbent.

The C4 rubber is a more high-performance action sports rubber. Its one of the most versatile rubber compound to aid technical approaches, terrain, and angles.


Thanks again to everybody who provided input. :)
michaelp
Joined Apr 28, 2013
73 points
Jun 29, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: gilman
I can describe several experiences with 5/10 approach shoes with 3 words:
De
Lam
Ination
Mike Lane
From Centennial, CO
Joined Jan 21, 2006
1,025 points
Jun 30, 2016
michaelp wrote:
here is what Five Ten said about the difference in the rubbers. The S1 rubber provides unparalleled grip on wet/dry surfaces, adding superior grip with rugged durability, and having a balance of stability and flexibility. Also shock absorbent. The C4 rubber is a more high-performance action sports rubber. Its one of the most versatile rubber compound to aid technical approaches, terrain, and angles.


That doesn't mean anything. According to this, S1 is unparalled in wet and dry. Yet the C4 is more versatile...dafuq?

The C4 is high performance but the S1 has "unparalled grip", "superior grip" (superior to what?), stability, durability and flexibility. So is it also high performance?

Bunch of buzzwords that add more confusion than clarity to the customer's choice.
John The Wolf
Joined Feb 13, 2015
53 points
Jun 30, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: Aleks
climbing friend,

an "approach shoe" is basically a waste of money that only a true wang-slapper would buy. go yourself to wal mart and buy yourself pair of $20 shoes. No, they aren't quite as nice, but yes, it doesn't really matter at all.

you would be looking quite fancy and nice in the approach shoes, and have warm feelings inside, but the rubber wears out faster than donald trump's wives' sexual interest in him.
Aleks Zebastian
From Boulder, CO
Joined Jul 3, 2014
162 points
Jun 30, 2016
Aleks Zebastian wrote:
climbing friend, an "approach shoe" is basically a waste of money that only a true wang-slapper would buy. go yourself to wal mart and buy yourself pair of $20 shoes. No, they aren't quite as nice, but yes, it doesn't really matter at all. you would be looking quite fancy and nice in the approach shoes, and have warm feelings inside, but the rubber wears out faster than donald trump's wives' sexual interest in him.


I mean... if you've ever had to do granite friction slabs on an approach or descent then I think you could appreciate the value of having sticky rubber on your shoes.
Nathanael
From Riverside, CA
Joined May 27, 2011
258 points
Jun 30, 2016
John The Wolf wrote:
That doesn't mean anything. According to this, S1 is unparalled in wet and dry. Yet the C4 is more versatile...dafuq? The C4 is high performance but the S1 has "unparalled grip", "superior grip" (superior to what?), stability, durability and flexibility. So is it also high performance? Bunch of buzzwords that add more confusion than clarity to the customer's choice.

Yeah I agree that the marketing-speak is hiding the actual information.

My takeaway from their reply was that the C4 rubber is higher performance (i.e., generally stickier). The S1 rubber is more durable and shock absorbent and perhaps better when things are wet. But I could be wrong.
michaelp
Joined Apr 28, 2013
73 points
Jun 30, 2016
C4 is targeted primarily to the rock shoe and approach shoe customer. with an exception on one of the bike styles. therefor the "lingo" should be taken as "compared to other stealth rubber compounds targeted towards the rock climber, or rock surface user, C4 is highly versatile. note no rock shoes have S1 these days.

S1 , has currently become synonymous with Bike application as well as other non-rock shoe styles, and as such the "lingo" is targeted towards that customer who may be thinking more about friction and grip to pedals than rock. meaning S1 is a historically very versatile rubber for sticking to pedals, being durable, providing cushioning, and giving grip off the pedal ( on wet/dry surfaces, rock, roots, regg.. you get the idea)

for running up or down slabs of smooth polished granite, C4 can give more friction, sensitivity than S1 as well as edge better if that is called upon while being used as an approach shoe.

S1 can provide more durability, more cushioning, while still giving the user a very high level of pure friction when needed.
Stealthy
Joined Apr 4, 2013
609 points
Jun 30, 2016
Ah...that's super enlightening. Thanks! michaelp
Joined Apr 28, 2013
73 points
Jul 2, 2016
Stealthy wrote:
C4 is targeted primarily to the rock shoe and approach shoe customer. with an exception on one of the bike styles. therefor the "lingo" should be taken as "compared to other stealth rubber compounds targeted towards the rock climber, or rock surface user, C4 is highly versatile. note no rock shoes have S1 these days. S1 , has currently become synonymous with Bike application as well as other non-rock shoe styles, and as such the "lingo" is targeted towards that customer who may be thinking more about friction and grip to pedals than rock. meaning S1 is a historically very versatile rubber for sticking to pedals, being durable, providing cushioning, and giving grip off the pedal ( on wet/dry surfaces, rock, roots, regg.. you get the idea) for running up or down slabs of smooth polished granite, C4 can give more friction, sensitivity than S1 as well as edge better if that is called upon while being used as an approach shoe. S1 can provide more durability, more cushioning, while still giving the user a very high level of pure friction when needed.

Interesting, thanks.
John The Wolf
Joined Feb 13, 2015
53 points
Jul 2, 2016
Hopefully also informative. I think what Fiveten is saying with S1 is that compared to other bands rubber in the bike and approach shoe category, it is superior. Might even be superior to C4 is cushioning and durability are as important as pure climbing ability.

in praise of S1, it's a fantastic rubber when lots of the users weight is being applied like pounding down a trail, walking down a slab with all your weight on the bulk of your foot, or while pushing down hard onto your pedals while biking in bumpy conditions where a foot slip could be disastrous. If put on a rock shoe, if think on the slabs they would be sweet! I know I've felt dupe secure walking down face first some steep polished slabs in Tahquitz and in the cascades... Sometimes even running with water.
Stealthy
Joined Apr 4, 2013
609 points
Jul 2, 2016
Mesh and foam? These look like those crappy "Polo" brand shoes that are always on clearance at Ross.

You'd have to be insane to spend $130 on these shoes if you plan on actually climbing in them.

I can climb 5.10 in La Sportiva Boulder X's, I can also backpack into the Winds with them wearing a heavy pack. Only thing they aren't great for is really wet areas. They cost $110 and last 2-3 seasons of heavy use.
highaltitudeflatulentexpulsion
From Colorado
Joined Oct 29, 2012
43 points
Nov 8, 2016
At the risk of reviving a dead thread, can anyone comment on the sizing of these? I wear a 9.5 in the guide tennie which fit perfectly. I ordered a size 10 in the access (not mesh) and it is so tight in the mid foot I can't wear them for more than half an hour. Should I go for a 10.5, try to pain through these stretching, or just give up on the access? I don't feel like my feet are exceptionally wide (never buy a wide shoe) and am blown away by the sizing difference between the guide tennies. Browning Gentry
Joined Nov 2, 2013
16 points
Nov 9, 2016
Browning Gentry wrote:
At the risk of reviving a dead thread, can anyone comment on the sizing of these? I wear a 9.5 in the guide tennie which fit perfectly. I ordered a size 10 in the access (not mesh) and it is so tight in the mid foot I can't wear them for more than half an hour. Should I go for a 10.5, try to pain through these stretching, or just give up on the access? I don't feel like my feet are exceptionally wide (never buy a wide shoe) and am blown away by the sizing difference between the guide tennies.

Your experience is normal. I also went up a half size and the Access fits me well, but the mid-foot is more snug than the Guide Tennie. I have a very narro foot so it works for me. I don't know if going bigger will make them too long and still not wide enough for an average or wide foot.
Ryan Hamilton
From Orem
Joined Aug 11, 2011
34 points


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