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Easier Mountain Routes
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Aug 31, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: wiped
I am here looking for advice on bigger mountain/alpine style routes of easier technical climbing. Some of the routes ive done that model what I am looking for include pigeon spire in the bugaboos (5.4), solo flight on lone eagle peak CO. Pinnacle Peak in the Tatoosh range.

Basically these are all decent elevation gain, easy technical climbs, on mountans/peaks. I enjoy simul climbing with a light rack and doubled up half rope. Topping out on peaks with extraordinary views. Feeling confident that the climbing is well within my ability so I can just enjoy the surroundings.

If anyone has some routes that fit this description, that they would recommend, Id greatly appreciate. Always looking to plan my next adventure.

Here are some I am already hoping to do in the next couple years:
-Upper Exum
-Northwest Ridge, Mt Sir Donald, Canada
-Wham Ridge, CO
-Kieners Route, CO
-NE Ridge, Lone Pine Peak
-East Ledges, Pingora Cirque of the Towers
-West Face, Overhanging Tower Cirque of the Towers

Thanks!
Jake wander
Joined Aug 11, 2014
168 points
Aug 31, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: Wolf's Head in the Cirque
What about the NE Buttress of Goode Mountain, the longest continuous rock climb in the Cascades*? 800m of 5.5 (or easier) blocky schist! I did it with a doubled twin, and though we did end up pitching some parts out I don't think it was really necessary.

mountainproject.com/v/northeas...

It is a 14-mile hike in and a 21-mile hike out, though. It has been done in a day, if you're into the whole speedwalking thing.

Or, if you want something with comparatively chill access (and in the Rockies), there's always the West Slabs of Mount Olympus. 500m of juggy 5.5 quartzite (I think). Not really big mountain ambiance, if that's what you're going for. Crux is picking the correct descent gully.

  • according to a guy I talked to on the route
Todd Anderson
From Seattle, WA
Joined Jun 6, 2011
149 points
Aug 31, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: wiped
Todd Anderson wrote:
What about the NE Buttress of Goode Mountain, the longest continuous rock climb in the Cascades*? 800m of 5.5 (or easier) blocky schist! I did it with a doubled twin, and though we did end up pitching some parts out I don't think it was really necessary. mountainproject.com/v/northeas... It is a 14-mile hike in and a 21-mile hike out, though. It has been done in a day, if you're into the whole speedwalking thing. Or, if you want something with comparatively chill access (and in the Rockies), there's always the West Slabs of Mount Olympus. 500m of juggy 5.5 quartzite (I think). Not really big mountain ambiance, if that's what you're going for. Crux is picking the correct descent gully. *according to a guy I talked to on the route


Goode is just the kind of climbing im looking for. dont mind the longer approaches, as I enjoy backpacking too. added to the list. THANKS.
Jake wander
Joined Aug 11, 2014
168 points
Aug 31, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: Shuksan summit with the tiger
Mt Goode is worth checking out. It's the tallest mountain in North Cascades National Park and you can't see any roads from the top. Plus everyone should visit Stehekin because it is awesome. If you are looking for moderate alpine remoteness Bonanza Peak fits the bill with Bushwacking, Glaciers and long (3-600m?) rock routes from 4th to 5.9.

A lot of Sierra rock would also fit the bill with moderate ridge routes like Matthes Crest and Thunderbolt Sill Traverse on bomber granite.
Alexander K
From Boulder, CO
Joined Oct 26, 2014
68 points
Aug 31, 2016
E Ridge of Wolf's Head and N Ridge of Ellingwood come to mind in the Winds. Depending on how easy you want the technical climbing to be, there's a lot of stuff for you in the Winds.

Buckingham Ridge, the North Ridge and maybe the Dike Route on Middle Teton, East Ridge of Grand Teton and CMC Route on Moran are all worthwhile objectives in the Tetons.

Here in Colorado we've got the N Buttress of Sneffels, the Wilson-El dinette traverse, the Little bear - Blanca traverse, Ellingwood Arete on Crestone Needle. RMNP has Keyhole Ridge and the Cables on Long's. The Beaver (Long's) might be more of a hike, but it's still fun. Then there's Crescent Ridge on Pagoda, N Ridge of Spearhead, and Donner and Blitzen Ridges on Ypsilon. The West Ridge of Isolation Peak is, again, more of a long hike with some scrambling, but still an excellent day out.

Along with Matthes Crest Mt. Conness, Cathedral Peak and Tenaya Peak are all worth looking at in the Yosemite area.
mark felber
From Wheat Ridge, CO
Joined Jul 30, 2005
66 points
Aug 31, 2016
East ridge of Mt Temple in Banff NP is not to be missed kiff
Joined Jan 8, 2010
567 points
Aug 31, 2016
Snow & ice or rock only?

"Easy technical climbs on mountains" encompasses a lot of stuff. Mountains/routes that don't qualify might be a shorter list. Here a short sampling of Portland-centric PNW options (assuming moderate ice/snow is also on the table):

-Unicorn Peak, Tatoosh
-Lane Peak, Tatoosh
-Hood, Leuthold Couloir
-Hood, Cooper Spur
-Adams, North Ridge
-Middle Sister, SE ridge
-Thielsen
-Mt. Washington (Oregon)
-Three Fingered Jack
-Colchuck Peak
-Mt. Stuart (W. Ridge?)
-Ingalls
-Forbidden
-Sahale
-Shuksan

If you're willing to do long approaches, climb mid-5th terrain, and moderate snow/ice, there aren't a lot of mountains that you can't climb. This will be a really long list...
Kyle Tarry
From Portland, OR
Joined Mar 5, 2015
96 points
Aug 31, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: wiped
Kyle Tarry wrote:
Snow & ice or rock only? "Easy technical climbs on mountains" encompasses a lot of stuff. Mountains/routes that don't qualify might be a shorter list. Here a short sampling of Portland-centric PNW options (assuming moderate ice/snow is also on the table): -Unicorn Peak, Tatoosh -Lane Peak, Tatoosh -Hood, Leuthold Couloir -Hood, Cooper Spur -Adams, North Ridge -Middle Sister, SE ridge -Thielsen -Mt. Washington (Oregon) -Three Fingered Jack -Colchuck Peak -Mt. Stuart (W. Ridge?) -Ingalls -Forbidden -Sahale -Shuksan If you're willing to do long approaches, climb mid-5th terrain, and moderate snow/ice, there aren't a lot of mountains that you can't climb. This will be a really long list...


Thanks everyone for all the responses.

Kyle, I know im not being picky enough to make a complete list. I guess my goal was to have posters read my description and be reminded of some specific peaks they climbed and thoroughly enjoyed of a similar variety. I was originally using the route finder, but as you mentioned, there are just too many routes that fall into the category I mentioned. Being from Minnesota, the travel to these places is fairly extensive. And having a 6 mo at home means I only get a couple trips a year for awhile. Therefore I am looking for those places that stick with you for a lifetime, like the Bugaboos will for me. Thanks again!
Jake wander
Joined Aug 11, 2014
168 points
Aug 31, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: KenR below Wahoo gullies
The California High Sierras have a number of great routes like that . (and often reliable weather). And more people out doing them and reporting on them.
Special feature is link-ups.

For maximum proportion of fun climbing with exposure and the most spectacular views, Europe has the best and most - (also amazing seaside horizontal traverses), though some of that comes along with crowds and mechanization.

If you want the macho "alone in the wilderness" style, then USA is better for that - (though don't count on being alone soloing up Cathedral Peak SE Buttress on a nice afternoon).

Some key selection criteria:
  • proportion of trail-running (and off-trail running) to climbing/scrambling.
. . . (some areas of Sierras are great for off-trail running, and
. . . .many areas have fun easy on-trail running approaches).

  • technical difficulty: Several of the favorite Sierra link-ups have 5.6 sequences. One has a notable 5.8 down-climb move (but since you say you like to carry a rope, you might not worry).

A favorite modern "trail-runners who can handle difficulty" route is the Tenaya - Matthes - Cathedral link-up. While for non-runners the more traditional Cathedral Range Traverse has a higher proportion of fun climbing and easier logistics.

An "emerging" USA region is Las Vegas and SW Utah, with two substantial print guidebooks for "easier mountain routes" (also might want to consider "canyon" routes). Red Rocks is not just for Trad and Sport climbing. In Zion N.P. while Angels Landing is the not-to-be-misses Euro-style 3rd class route, a highly-regarded low-5th class nearby is Lady Mountain.

Ken
kenr
Joined Oct 29, 2010
7,303 points
Aug 31, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: KenR below Wahoo gullies
If I might suggest one iconic USA "destination travel" route, try the
east edge of South ridge of Mt Whitney
. (highest peak in the main 48 states).

In addition to "high concept", this route is long, has big exposure, great scenery (esp early season with snow around), lots of fun moves with selectable difficulty, lots of little summits to cross (in addition to the Big one), easy (though long) descent.

Though it's easier to do it up-and-back by the Mount Whitney Trail approach to Trail Crest, a more complete adventure would be to ascend North Fork Long Pine Creek and Mountaineer's Gully to the summit of Mt Whitney, descend the Happy Cowboy / South ridge (including a partial traverse of Mt Muir), then finish jogging down the Mount Whitney Trail.

Drawbacks are:
  • need a permit (even for car-to-car in a day).
  • Not committing (you can dial the difficulty or exposure or length almost any way you want).
  • altitude acclimatization

Ken
kenr
Joined Oct 29, 2010
7,303 points


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