Route Guide    Partners    Forum    Photos    What's New    Journal        
Sign Up  |   Log In:Login with Facebook
REI Community
Crash pads - Quality vs. quantity
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
Nov 17, 2015
Rock Climbing Photo: Profile pic
I was looking through this thread

Crash pad suggestions

and it got me thinking...

What are your opinions considering the quality vs. number of pads you buy/use? I don't boulder that often, but when I do, it's usually with my wife or maybe a couple of sport climber friends who don't have many (if any) crash pads.

If I really want to be safe, should I spend money on one nice big Organic ($300) or four to six second-hand mad rock/ metolius pads ($50-100 each)?

I understand that a crappy pad isn't any better than hitting the dirt if you still break your ankle, but think about it... you could cover more area, two pads deep, with 4-6 used/cheap pads than you could with one big, expensive pad. Plus, you have more flexibility with separate pads to cover up that wierd rock, the traversing moves, the sit start, or whatever. And in many, many cases, a crappy pad is WAY better than no pad at all - so that extra surface area is important.

On the flipside - sometimes having one big pad is better because there are less pad edges to roll your ankle on. And 6 pads don't fit well in a small car or studio apartment. And a good spotter should to be able to move the pad to keep it under you.

How many of you have been hurt because you missed your pads? How many of you have been hurt because you hit your pads, but they didn't do their job?

Thoughts?
Anson Call
From Provo, UT
Joined Jan 12, 2010
44 points
Nov 17, 2015
I myself like to carry one pad along with my shoes, snacks, ect.... so I like my big stiff organic pad.. its not as stiff as rocks and earth but it works EeT
Joined Jan 18, 2015
0 points
Nov 17, 2015
Rock Climbing Photo: Tough Mantle Problem.  Haven't sent yet...
The organic big 5" is the way to go. Its not just about surface area. It's about longevity. The other pads will be bottomed out in a season of heavy use.

But surface area is also important. When you put two pads next to each other, the connection point ends up being right where you are likely to fall. And Murphy's Law applies when it comes to landing in between pads.

It's also really nice to just carry one big pad.
Rob Gordon
From Hollywood, CA
Joined Feb 2, 2009
139 points
Nov 17, 2015
I guess the cop-out answer is "both". Really, though, this is a sensible and common approach. It is nice to have a high quality "A-team" pad, i.e. the one you take if only one pad is going along. This is especially true if there is a decent hike in, and carrying more than one pad would be impractical--so its nice if the one you do carry in is a good quality and large pad. Then, to supplement this, you can fill in with a collection of older, cheaper, and/or second-hand "B-team" pads that you bring along when you need a lot of foam, or when doing a solo session, or when roadside, etc.

A good setup is to have a big pad (such as the Organic Big Pad) for the main landing zone, and then a smaller satellite pad to pad the start, fill in a gap, etc. The smaller pad can either strap on the back of the big pad, or potentially be folded inside.
JCM
From Seattle, WA
Joined Jun 9, 2008
65 points
Nov 17, 2015
Rock Climbing Photo: Gear
Question...how are you going to carry in 4 - 6 crash pads. Im just thinking that you'll get tired of doing that everytime you want to boulder. Isnt having your pad under you your spotters job...or to redirect you back onto the pad so you don't hit the dirt? RockinOut
From NY, NY
Joined May 8, 2010
106 points
Nov 17, 2015
Rock Climbing Photo: Slashface goodness taken by RTM
I feel that regardless of the pad(s) you have the most important thing is knowing how to use them. Padcraft is just like protection in other facets of climbing, there are very few absolutes and knowing how to adapt to a given situation is much more important than having shiny gear, and just like climbing with a rope, you the climber are your best piece of pro. With that said, quality is always a good choice, quality of stitching, straps, shell, and foam. It will be worth it in the long run. I have a flashed pad that is going on ten years of heavy usage, well worth the cost. Mike Brady
From Van Diesel, OR
Joined Jul 14, 2014
692 points
Nov 17, 2015
Rock Climbing Photo: Profile pic
RockinOut wrote:
Question...how are you going to carry in 4 - 6 crash pads.


Yeah, good point. I guess a lot of places I go are pretty much roadside, but a few aren't. So that's a +1 for the big pad.
Anson Call
From Provo, UT
Joined Jan 12, 2010
44 points
Administrator
Nov 17, 2015
Rock Climbing Photo: OMG!
RockinOut wrote:
Question...how are you going to carry in 4 - 6 crash pads. Im just thinking that you'll get tired of doing that everytime you want to boulder.

What are friends for?
Muscrat
Joined Oct 27, 2011
3,553 points


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.