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Boulder, CO climber moving to East Coast
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Jan 7, 2017
john strand wrote:
really everyone should experience the thrills of Meridan at least once....

after 1" of snow today-

wtnh.com/2017/01/07/i-91-close...
T Roper
From DC,VA,NM,UT,CT,MA
Joined Mar 31, 2006
730 points
Jan 7, 2017
Not a suprise ! It's the massive hills that create chaos on the roads.

There is some decent climbing in CT, it's just the "everything else" that can be an issue
john strand
From southern colo
Joined May 22, 2008
1,575 points
Jan 7, 2017
As for NJ and CT. Live in NYC first. You're not moving to NY to live in the burbs. There are pluses to those places, but you won't get the real bonuses of NYC and its culture. And Jersey City/Hoboken are not nearly as convenient as the close in neighborhoods of BK and Qns, trust me I've done both. AHP
Joined May 4, 2013
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
AHP wrote:
As for NJ and CT. Live in NYC first. You're not moving to NY to live in the burbs. There are pluses to those places, but you won't get the real bonuses of NYC and its culture. And Jersey City/Hoboken are not nearly as convenient as the close in neighborhoods of BK and Qns, trust me I've done both.


I can agree with that, I only threw out CT because it fit all of the OP's requirements. Other than that CT is a cesspool of suburbs and declining cities. I live on the CT/MA border and I know a few people that travel to Boston and NYC a few times a week for work which I would do way before living in Jersey. Call me a snob but the few times a year I have to drive through New Jersey I always thank bejesus I dont live there!
T Roper
From DC,VA,NM,UT,CT,MA
Joined Mar 31, 2006
730 points
Jan 7, 2017
NYC is a bit like Vegas..visit, but not to live.Maybe if your 21 and have lots of $$ ?

I lived west of Boston for quite a while,,nice area,mucho $$ and suck weather, quick shuttle to the airport..etc

You get what you pay for in the east
john strand
From southern colo
Joined May 22, 2008
1,575 points
Jan 7, 2017
Personally, having lived in the NYC for the past 30 years, I would never want to move here as a climber. Few discrete points on the topic:

-- most people that tell you "go for it" don't realise what you are giving up and thus you should take their advice with a grain of salt. You will quickly resent lack of accesible outdoors, but your social life might improve

-- you can exist here as a climber, however being a boulderer is easy (CP is semi-OK and has problems up to v10) while being an active sport climber is nearly impossible.

-- to properly take advantage of other excitement that's happening in the city, you want to be in the city proper (Manhattan) or close to it like in the near Brooklyn. Otherwise, you'll get all of the NYCs disadvantages without any of the perks.

-- despite the expence, you do need a car if you are into any outdoor sport, especially climbing. It's gonna cost you dearly (my UES parking spot is $500/month), but the breakeven is just 7-8 day-trips a month.

-- whatever you think your salary is going to be, divide it by 2 to get how that salary will feel. NYC is expensive and you'll find that your raise is not gonna go as far as you thought it would.

-- if, after all, you decided to move here, welcome! Hit me up and we will go bouldering :)
Nivel Egres
From New York, NY
Joined Dec 10, 2014
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
Nivel Egres wrote:
(my UES parking spot is $500/month)


Hahahahaha :-)
jdejace
From New England
Joined Sep 20, 2013
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
jdejace wrote:
Hahahahaha :-)


Actually, it's cheap
Nivel Egres
From New York, NY
Joined Dec 10, 2014
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
john strand wrote:
NYC is a bit like Vegas..visit, but not to live.Maybe if your 21 and have lots of $$ ?


If by NYC, you mean Times Square, then yes. Beyond TS, which New Yorkers avoid like plague, Gotham is a living breathing city with real neighborhoods, real history, real art and culture. It could be quite cheap (outside of rent) if you spend there more than a week. Where else can you get a $500 haircut for free, score brand new designer clothes for $5, see a play on Broadway with the A-cast for around $20, go see real Picasso and Dali for free and get an amazing meal from a hole in the wall for under $10?

Re: parking, you can get free on-street parking if you live in Brooklyn or Queens. You just need to deal with once or twice a week alternate parking rules. Oh yeah, living on UES could be soul-crushing - look at Nivel.
doligo
Joined Sep 26, 2008
212 points
Jan 7, 2017
doligo wrote:
Re: parking, you can get free on-street parking if you live in Brooklyn or Queens. You just need to deal with once or twice a week alternate parking rules.

Been there, done that for two years while living in Astoria. You end up spending countless hours searching for a spot and moving your car around. As they say, there are no free lunches. Instead, in Brooklyn or Queens, you can still find open lot parking for 150 a month.

doligo wrote:
Oh yeah, living on UES could be soul-crushing - look at Nivel.

Hell yeah, it's horrible :) the Prozac prescription is half of my salary.

While I am all for the positive vibes, the OP also needs to know the reality of living here. None of the people that moved out West are too eager to move back to the NYC.
Nivel Egres
From New York, NY
Joined Dec 10, 2014
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
SMarsh wrote:
To try to answer some of your latest questions, I'll pop in. I'm in the NY metro area and I've lived here for a long, long time. My husband and I came here for work and my MBA, and we climb, bike, and ski. While it's nice to have a NYC address, you might consider Hoboken or Jersey City. You have more likelihood of finding an apartment with available parking at a cost that's less. You'll be able to head for Newark Airport to fly places, and drive to the Gunks and other places. I'd advocate for the fun you'll have. You'll probably do a lot of fun things over the weekends, even if on a particular weekend you don't get outdoors to climb. There are just so many things to do in the NY metro area. A great part of your happiness depends on the fun you have doing your job. If you're going to be on the road, and if you're not having fun with whoever you see for business, you won't be having a lot of fun between. As for the train, well, I'd like to say it works well for me. I live on the main line between NY and Philadelphia, which puts me near some sort of midpoint between DC and Boston. We chose to live 100 yards from a train station. We chose to live 15 minutes from Newark Airport. That combination has gotten me into the city when multiple kinds of transportation have failed. If the roads were impassable, the train worked. If the train was out of service, bus service worked. I know about 15 ways of getting to the same locations in NYC. My husband and I changed jobs, changed industries, changed job types and still we thrived. There's more choice here in the NY metro area. From Newark, there are lots of flights to Boston or DC. Philadelphia is more of a drive or train trip. No location is perfect. By train, I could never get to locations on the CT train line in time for any normal meetings. And for long trips, I have had more luck either flying or driving. Maybe it's me -- I could have some sort of very bad luck. One time I chose to take a train home from DC rather than fly. My flight was cancelled because of bad thunderstorms. What happened when I switched? Well, the pantograph was struck by lightening. I sat in a crowded train somewhere between Trenton, NJ and Princeton, NJ for about 8 hours. I finally reached home at 3 am, I think. But really, it's possible to take the train if you're not as unlucky as I.

F R E E THE PALISADES(Hudson_River)(Hudson_River) hit the link then click on The Palisades (Hudson River), cliffs along the Hudson River in the US states of New York and New Jersey
Michael Schneider
Joined Apr 24, 2014
70 points
Jan 7, 2017
Nivel Egres wrote:
Personally, having lived in the NYC for the past 30 years,
If it's so bad why have you lived there for 30 years? I did ask my cousin why she doesn't live NYC and she said, "I don't know how to leave" since both her and her husband have high-paying jobs there.
Nivel Egres wrote:
While I am all for the positive vibes, the OP also needs to know the reality of living here. None of the people that moved out West are too eager to move back to the NYC.
I agree I am not trying to live in NYC. I was born there and lived in NJ 10 years, my parents forced me go to every weekend to "Chinatown" and "Flushing" and for <10 yrs old it was boring to just go eat Chinese food all the time. I have also collected too much stuff through the years (my old roommate called me a grandma that has lots of odds and ends) to live somewhere without amble storage and am too old for roommates anymore, but I was ok with roommates for 15 years of my life.

This isn't a life sentence for OP, he can Move to NYC, Move to a smaller NE town, move back to Boulder, Move even more West, Move to the burbs, Move to the country, Move out the Country. As I say, we aren't trees stuck in the ground. Being a youngster you can be more mobile than later in life.

I like to imagine NYC & Manhattan 500 years ago, how unrecognizable it looked with trees and rivers and no statue of liberty, bridges, or skyscapers.
Ana Tine
Joined Dec 7, 2012
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
Ana Tine wrote:
If it's so bad why have you lived there for 30 years?

First, I came for college, then I went to graduate school, then I got a job, then a business that I sold about two years ago. Actually trying to move myself and my new company out out west right now, so there is the answer.
Nivel Egres
From New York, NY
Joined Dec 10, 2014
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
Nivel Egres wrote:
you want to be in the city proper (Manhattan) or close to it like in the near Brooklyn. Otherwise, you'll get all of the NYCs disadvantages without any of the perks.


If someone who's going to be away traveling at least half the time finds an apartment on the west side of the Hudson River, within walking or bicycling distance of a PATH or NJ Transit rail station, then lets check the scoring ...

?? All NYC disadvantages ??
  • much lower rent
  • free parking
  • straightforward access to Manhattan without car traffic.
. . (can use the train time for texts, calls, emails, Facebook, reading, etc).
  • quicker easier access to Newark airport (EWR) than from Manhattan,
. . with lots of flights to destinations far and near.
. . since Newark is a big United hub, lots of ways to fly to Denver.
  • several Amtrak stations if needed.
  • easy access to multiple interstate highways to drive for work meeting in Philadelphia + Baltimore, also CT + MA, can even drive to Boston if need to.
  • quick driving access to lots of bouldering and top-roping in NJ + southern NY.
  • easy driving up to the Gunks without bridge traffic and tolls.

?? without any of its perks ??
  • take the train into bars + restaurants any time you want it.
  • museums, concerts, etc any time you want it.
. . (without the parking and traffic hassle).
  • easy to meet friends from the other side (Queens or Brooklyn or Westchester or Long Island) just by agreeing to meet in Manhattan.

The main disadvantage is that if you meet people at a social event, he has to say he lives in New Jersey - (or maybe he doesn't say?)

Nivel Egres wrote:
being an active sport climber is nearly impossible.

I suppose that's why Sasha DeGiulian's climbing ability declined so precipitiously while she lived here for four years??

I note three big indoor gyms have opened in recent years - (one of my regular climbing partners often sees Ashima Shirai at one of them), so you can at least stay in practice for sport leading.
. . (while waiting for a free week to catch one of the non-stop flights from EWR or JFK to Barcelona or Madrid).

Ken
kenr
Joined Oct 29, 2010
7,038 points
Jan 7, 2017
^^^lives in Jersey and wont admit it^^^ T Roper
From DC,VA,NM,UT,CT,MA
Joined Mar 31, 2006
730 points
Jan 7, 2017
^^ rofl
Maybe don't say- lol What did NJ do to deserve this social leprosy :(
I lived in NJ the first 10 years of my life. I enjoyed climbing the 2 Japanese maple trees in my front lawn, the daffodil that bloomed without fail every year, the sunflowers & hydrangeas, the "uptown" area of my town Glen Rock, the train that ran thru my back yard, the vegetable garden I grew, the authentic Italian joint with Italian Ice and the best pizza. The motto isn't the garden state for nothing, it's easy to grow flowers, veggies and herbs there and the grass is soft. I didn't like the bullying in Elementary school because I was 1-2 years younger and way smaller. But I imagine OP won't be in elementary school.
kenr makes good points. Me not so much.
Maybe I will throw a more useful comment about the tolls. When I drove back from the Gunks to the JFK airport I was surprised to pass through my old town before crossing the bridge to NYC. The Bridge traffic to NYC is the worst. Thought I was going to miss my flight. It's like $15 for the toll to cross the Holland Tunnel from NJ to NY.
Ana Tine
Joined Dec 7, 2012
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
Seeing this thread a little late but unless you really like driving I would not consider NYC. You chose NYC for the culture not the climbing.

Yes, the Gunks is 1 hr away...if there is no traffic. I don't live in NYC but I have done the drive to NYC from the Gunks twice on Sunday night and at least 2hrs each time. Adirondacks are great but a drive.

I think you want the North Shore of Boston. I never recommend Boston in these threads but for you I think it is the best fit. Only 30 mins from Logan. Lots of local bouldering and trail running. Easy access to 95 for south NH climbing and other big climbing destinations in the White Mtns.
Eric8
From Maynard, MA
Joined Nov 2, 2007
200 points
Jan 7, 2017
kenr wrote:
* quick driving access to lots of bouldering and top-roping in NJ + southern NY.

If you could name a single location that not kitty litter...

All I am saying that if you are moving to experience the NYC, you don't want to live in Fairlawn. Otherwise, there is almost nothing shameful about living in NJ.
Nivel Egres
From New York, NY
Joined Dec 10, 2014
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
Nivel Egres wrote:
If you could name a single location that not kitty litter

How about the V14 problem that Ashima Shirai sent in the last couple of years?
Closer to the GW Bridge than to the Gunks.

Anyway the Gunks had lots of loose rock when they first opened. Even nowadays, try going off-route there and see what happens.

Many new sport-climbing areas in Europe and USA that have opened in the last ten or twenty years were considered by experienced knowledgeable climbers as choss-piles before they got cleaned.

Ken
kenr
Joined Oct 29, 2010
7,038 points
Jan 7, 2017
This thread has educated me that Boulderites have much to learn about snobbiness from New Yorkers. reboot
From Westminster, CO
Joined Jul 17, 2006
50 points
Jan 7, 2017
reboot wrote:
This thread has educated me that Boulderites have much to learn about snobbiness from New Yorkers.

Yeah, Manhattan is a primary snob breeding ground :)
Nivel Egres
From New York, NY
Joined Dec 10, 2014
0 points
Jan 7, 2017
Nah. There's a reason there is no "How do you know someone is from Manhattan?" joke... doligo
Joined Sep 26, 2008
212 points
Jan 8, 2017
Nivel Egres wrote:
While I am all for the positive vibes, the OP also needs to know the reality of living here. None of the people that moved out West are too eager to move back to the NYC.


^^^ +2,401,311

New York on a whole is losing people every year. (Crappy) Weather, (high) taxes, (high) cost of living. You get 2/3 of those "benefits" in many places out West, but the weather is 180 degrees towards favorable. And let's not forget the vast swaths of rock to climb.
Kevin Heckeler
From Upstate New York
Joined Jul 10, 2010
1,361 points
Jan 8, 2017
Ana Tine wrote:
I like to imagine NYC & Manhattan 500 years ago, how unrecognizable it looked with trees and rivers and no statue of liberty, bridges, or skyscapers.


Me too. It was probably really awesome/beautiful. :(
Kevin Heckeler
From Upstate New York
Joined Jul 10, 2010
1,361 points
Jan 8, 2017
New Yorker, born and raised, 5th generation, at least. Left four years ago for New Hampshire, and now Vermont.

This is the bottom line: how much do you want access to real mountains, and outdoor climbing/hiking?

If you can mostly live without climbing outside, and being in the mountains, then rock the NYC thing.

But, if you want anything close to the access you have in Boulder, or even fractionally close, then for fuck's sake, DO NOT MOVE TO NYC.

It isn't 4 hours to good mountains, it is more like 6. a shade under 2 hours AT BEST to the gunks, which can become 3-4 very easily, even if you are on the UWS of Manhattan.
It sucks. Unless you are a gym rat, then live in BK or Queens, close to the cliffs or BB.

I would much more heavily recommend Boston. You have similar transportation options, the same shitty traffic, but your access to climbing stuff is much improved. Pawtuckaway is close, and the white mountain playground is between 1:30-3 hours, depending upon your destination.

IF you can swing it, I throw you a curveball - Burlington VT - awesome small city with great access to all kinds of rock, snow and icy fun. Great culture scene, music, food, drink, etc.


lukeweiss
From Pike, NH
Joined Mar 12, 2014
0 points


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