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Approach Shoes Without Heel Loops
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Mar 14, 2016
Hey everyone,

My current pair of approach/trail running shoes, La Sportiva Wildcats, don't have any sort of loop on the heel that I can use to hang them off my harness. For climbs that aren't long enough to justify bringing a pack but have a walk-off, I am looking for some way to do this. I tried searching the forums and Google for similar questions but I wasn't able to find anything.

Has anyone else had this problem? Would there be any reason not to just hang it from the laces? Or is there a way that I could attach my own loop without compromising the padding on the back of the foot?

Thanks in advance for your advice!
Paul R
Joined Oct 28, 2015
1 points
Mar 14, 2016
Lightweight stuff sack just large enough for the shoes? Em Cos
From Boulder, CO
Joined Apr 21, 2010
11 points
Mar 14, 2016
use the loop of the lace by the toes. give the shoes massive shoe wedgies, and clip em together here, and then to you. goingUp
From over here
Joined Apr 9, 2013
68 points
Mar 14, 2016
I hang shoes by their front couple laces, near the toe. It doesn't mess up the lacing too badly usually.

I wish all approach shoes had a loop; if you didn't want it you could cut it off.
alpinejason
From Minneapolis
Joined Apr 25, 2010
149 points
Mar 14, 2016
I just tie all four laces (two from each shoe) together in an overhand and clip it to my harness like that. Because I'm paranoid, I clip one strand from each shoe (kind of like going into the "top shelf" on a masterpoint anchor). It's worked fine on many occasions. Jonathan Awerbuch
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Nov 11, 2013
41 points
Mar 14, 2016
The Wildcats are a trail-running shoe, not an approach shoe, which may explain the lack of loops. FrankPS
From Atascadero, CA
Joined Nov 19, 2009
284 points
Mar 14, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: After a very very damp and cold evening climbing o...
Yeah, they are trail shoes not approach shoes, you cant really complain. that guy named seb
Joined Oct 24, 2015
182 points
Mar 14, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: Another day at the city.
Pick up a pair of five ten guide tennies. Problem solved. Bonneville
From Salt Lake City, Utah
Joined Dec 2, 2013
154 points
Mar 14, 2016
goingUp wrote:
use the loop of the lace by the toes. give the shoes massive shoe wedgies, and clip em together here, and then to you.

This is how we did it bitd before there were such things as approach shoes and biner loops and we just wore our running shoes.

Wait. Just realized I replied to basically a ridiculous question. If the OP can't figure out something like this, how the hell does he manage to build anchors?
Marc801
From Sandy, Utah
Joined Feb 25, 2014
64 points
Mar 14, 2016
Marc801 wrote:
If the OP can't figure out something like this, how the hell does he manage to build anchors?


+1
NorCalNomad
From San Francisco
Joined Oct 6, 2011
127 points
Mar 14, 2016
Necessity is the mother of....inquiry?

Poor guy. He's probably sitting at the base right now , furiously waiting for a good idea to come through so he can start up.
Rob Dillon
Joined Mar 22, 2002
1,039 points
Mar 14, 2016
Thanks guys, I was planning on hanging it from my laces, and I couldn't think of a reason why not but I wanted to be sure!

Frank and Seb, you are right, and I should have clarified that they are running shoes that I currently use for longer approaches. As a broke college student, real approach shoes aren't quite in the budget yet.
Paul R
Joined Oct 28, 2015
1 points
Mar 15, 2016
Laces are probably more bomber than a single loop anyhow. I tend to back the loops up if consequences for a drop would be dire. Rob Dillon
Joined Mar 22, 2002
1,039 points
Mar 15, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: Killis Howard?
Marc801 wrote:
If the OP can't figure out something like this, how the hell does he manage to build anchors?


The Climbing magazine 'how to climb' foldout has anchor building... sorted!
Tim Lutz
Joined Aug 9, 2012
43 points
Mar 15, 2016
You can also tie a small loop of shoelace material or thin cord (2mm) through one of the toe eyelets. Marc801
From Sandy, Utah
Joined Feb 25, 2014
64 points
Mar 15, 2016
Rock Climbing Photo: After a very very damp and cold evening climbing o...
Paul R wrote:
Thanks guys, I was planning on hanging it from my laces, and I couldn't think of a reason why not but I wanted to be sure. Didn't intend for it to be a stupid question. Frank and Seb, you are right, and I should have clarified that they are running shoes that I currently use for longer approaches. As a broke college student, real approach shoes aren't quite in the budget yet.

They will probably serve you better than 99% of approach shoes, what ever you do don't get the new guide tennies they are a pile of crap, the rubber base is paper fine causing premature wear and delamination(fine rubber stretches and breaks the glue), i currently wear la sportiva and the rubber is a solid 5mm thick and that's with out taking the lugs into consideration.
that guy named seb
Joined Oct 24, 2015
182 points
Mar 15, 2016
+1

The guide tennies weight ~33 oz for the pair. I carry my old running shoes for multi pitch (Sportiva Helios) 19 oz for the pair and it makes a difference on the way up (and very little difference on the hike down).
Jonathan Awerbuch
From Boulder, Colorado
Joined Nov 11, 2013
41 points
Mar 15, 2016
I tie mine super loose so I can slip them on and off, double know the bunny ears, and clip all the loops to a biner on my haul loop. Then you can sit on em on rocky ledges. Nate Solnit
From Bath, NH
Joined May 28, 2013
6 points


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