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Routes in The Royal Tower

Blade, The T 5.10+ 6b+ 21 VII+ 20 E3 5b
Boomerang Buttress T 5.8+ 5b 16 VI- 15 HVS 4c
Chase, The T 5.10 6b 20 VII- 19 E2 5b A2
Di's Surprise T 5.9 5c 17 VI 17 HVS 5a A2
East Ridge T 5.8 5b 16 VI- 15 HVS 4c
Gargoyle Buttress T 5.10a 6a 18 VI+ 18 E1 5a
Got Lucky T 5.11 6c+ 23 VIII- 23 E4 5c
Jester, The T 5.10 6b 20 VII- 19 E2 5b
Royal Flush T M4
Southeast Face T 5.8 5b 16 VI- 15 HVS 4c
Spam and Legs T 5.8 5b 16 VI- 15 HVS 4c WI4 M5 A2
Type: Trad, Alpine, 2000 ft, 12 pitches, Grade IV
FA: Dave Anderson, Rob Feeney 1999
Page Views: 1,069 total, 21/month
Shared By: Brian Prince on Oct 4, 2013
Admins: Jared LaVacque, L. Von Dommelheimer

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Register with the NP Mountaineering Headquarters in Talkeetna, AK before climbing in the park! Details

Description

Probably the most popular route on the Royal Tower. Thanks to a striking line, mostly moderate climbing, and, most importantly, inclusion in Puryear's book, makes it easy to understand why. As noted, I would imagine the majority of parties stop at the top of the rock, but continuing to the summit makes for a really rewarding route. This, of course, requires carrying boots and tools all the way up there. At any rate, a very worthwhile route with very fun climbing in spots and amazing views. Easy to bail from any point.

Our first pitch, in late July, involved 30ft. of mixed climbing out of the moat and up a big snow "blob" to gain the rock proper. Be careful, either I just thought it up or I read of someone that witnessed this collapse. A most frightening image. The second pitch holds the routes crux (minus the blob) and is pretty dang cool face climbing over a little roof. Really short, well protected 5.10a. This is followed by an excellent, long 5.8 corner.

From here, we had a tough time following the topo, but had an ok time following our noses and rap anchors (plenty of them). There's a lot of 4th class. The 5th pitch (per the topo) is pretty obvious and goes out left from a piton belay that can actually be easy to miss. It is some really good climbing although a tad scary depending on how you do it.

A couple more pitches up there is a huge ledge with a snow patch on it. There were some slings in the right facing corner off this ledge, but we climbed up a ramp to access a full pitch of amazing, chicken headed face climbing to the right of the corner. From here, the buttress is a little more defined. Stay to the right of the arete for the most part, but we didn't really know where we were going. Just be on the look out for rap anchors.

We must have missed the "Gargoyle" boulder at the top of the buttress.

From the top of the rock, either rap, climb some broken rock to the right of the snowfield, or put yer boots on and slog to the summit. Beware of avalanche conditions.

Location

Pretty obvious from camp, look for the snow blob for the first pitch. Not many other landmarks... Don't go that far up the gully.

Protection

A single rack to #3 seemed plenty for us. 2 ropes is a good idea. Boots and at least one tool per person if summit. Crampons may also be necessary depending on conditions. Maybe an ice screw. We encountered some hard, blue ice in spots. If rapping, just shoes. Headlamp not necessary.

Photos

Gunkswest   CA
Anderson & Feeney spent several days cragging at the base of the Royal Tower and the Throne during their June 1999 trip (the trip they did the FA of Gargoyle Buttress). They reportedly repeated some great routes and climbed some new lines as well. May 13, 2015