Type: Trad, 400 ft (121 m), 4 pitches, Grade II
FA: Robin Barley, Bruce McDonald, Peter Shackleton ('95)
Page Views: 12,877 total · 77/month
Shared By: Andy Laakmann on Aug 12, 2008
Admins: Mark Roberts, Kate Lynn, Braden Batsford, Mauricio Herrera Cuadra

You & This Route


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Access Issue: Camping and COVID-19 - Guidelines Details
Access Issue: SLHANAY ROCK FALL CLOSURE - SEPT 20th 2021 Details

Description

An excellent and well-protected journey featuring a variety of movement. A classic climb for sure.

  • P1 (10d) The first pitch is long and steep (150+ feet), but fortunately protects well with a standard rack. Felt soft for a 10d, but that is what the guide gives it. A moderate lieback (hands) takes you to a short blank section and then to a finger crack. Traverse out the finger crack to the base of another hand crack. Up the hand crack and continue up until you get to the bolted belay. I thought the finger crack and first bit of the hand crack was the crux, and it seemed soft for 10d.
  • P2 (5.8) Take the low angled crack up and to the right. I passed the bolted belay and continued all the way up to the base of the steeper lieback crack of the next pitch and built a belay. Bomber hand size gear is available for the belay.
  • P3 (10c) Up the corner. Starts moderate and gets progressively harder all the way to the next anchor. One bolt protects the start of the crux. Bomber pro the whole way, but the final moves to the anchor are a touch exciting.
  • P4 (10c) Super fun, steep, juggy climbing past two bolts and then a long 5.8ish right-trending ramp. The first bolt is in kind of poor shape, but otherwise great protection.

Location

Take the trail until it hits the cliff. Move left about 40'. The beginning of the route can be identified by a left-facing lieback corner that turns into a traversing finger crack.

Protection

Nuts + doubles TCUs to #3. Lots of slings for the first pitch.

Photos