Type: Sport, 80 ft (24 m)
FA: Ward Smith 1998
Page Views: 10,077 total · 68/month
Shared By: Chris Duca on Jul 9, 2008 with 1 Suggestions
Admins: Jay Knower, M Sprague, lee hansche, Jeffrey LeCours, Jonathan Steitzer, Robert Hall

You & This Route


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Description

Possibly the most classic hard 11 at Rumney? You be the judge. While you are climbing this route, remember that it's been climbed barefoot!

This route has multiple sections of hard climbing, all of which offer very unique flow over stunning rock features with eye-popping exposure.

Start this affair on a slab of rock below the steep trail that heads to upper Orange Crush, beneath the roof capping a left-facing corner.

Reach over the void, clip the first bolt and easily traverse over to the corner. Make technical (but not physically difficult) moves rightward across the face to gain the arete, and a stance.

Step back onto the arete, master this, then tackle the steep, but short face with stout, fingery moves, high feet, and an interesting reach to the looming edge of the overhang above. Pull over the bulge and gain the nice ledge shared with multiple other routes.

Move back left onto the upper face and climb through some steep rock on positive holds to an easy mantle, depositing you at comfortable stance at the base of the crux.

(Get a good shake, as the climbing above is sustained, and is considered the techinical crux of the route.)

Delicately move up the slabby face to a very distinct India-shaped hold. Figure out how to utilize it, move past it, then gain the upper left-facing corner for the remaining, pumpy climbing to the anchors.

Location

On the approach trail/ladder to the upper Orange Crush. The Crusher starts on a slab behind some small boulders beneath the large roof cappping the left-facing corner.

Protection

13 bolts and chains. Long Runners and back-cleaning are helpful on some of the first bolts.

Photos