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Routes in 1. Butt Wall

Broomhillda S 5.10c 6b 20 VII 20 E2 5b
Butt Crack T 5.8 5b 16 VI- 15 HVS 4c
Going Greek S 5.9 5c 17 VI 17 HVS 5a
Left Cheek S 5.9 5c 17 VI 17 HVS 5a
Little Flatulence S 5.8+ 5b 16 VI- 15 HVS 4c
Matillda S 5.10b 6a+ 19 VII- 19 E2 5b
Nose, The T 5.6 4c 14 V 12 S 4b
Type: Trad, 700 ft, 5 pitches, Grade II
FA: unknown
Page Views: 14,672 total, 117/month
Shared By: John Peterson on Aug 12, 2007
Admins: Alvaro Arnal, Leo Paik, John McNamee, Frances Fierst, Monty, Monomaniac

You & This Route


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Description

The Nose is an excellent outing featuring lots of climbing on moderate rock. It is a great route to take kids / beginners on.

Start at the right side of Butt Wall. You'll see an obvious dike system leading up towards a large tree.

Pitch 1 (5.6). This is the crux - follow the dike. Adequate pro is available, but you can't always see it coming. The glacial polish adds some zest to the pitch. Pass a fixed pin and a bolted stance to the tree on a large ledge.

Pitch 2 (5.0). Work up easy rock, aiming for a small tree just to the right of an obvious dike system climbing the nose of the next tier.

Pitch 3 (5.6). Step up and left onto the dike. Clip a fixed pin and do a short crux at the initial bulge. Above, the climbing gets easier, but the pro is sparse. Work a bit right toward the next step. You could avoid this staying to the right. Belay at the end of your rope in a low angle area.

Pitch 4 (5.5). Climb up, aiming for an obvious crack at the left side of the steep area. Once up the crack, follow easy ground up and right towards trees.

You can unrope here and scramble the right side to the top or do an extra pitch.

Pitch 5. A final wall rises left of the big ledge atop P4. We shifted the belay to just left of a large tree and climbed a weakness on the right side of the step (5.8). Above, it's another 200' of 4th class to the summit.

Descend to the left.

Per BJ Sbarra: the best descent is to the East. From the summit, head north until you can pick up a faint trail that follows a mellow gully system through trees. Follow this around to the right, until you are heading east down a prominent gully (also low angled). From here, the way should be obvious, as the trail is fairly worn, with a few spots of downclimbing, and when you hit the aspen grove, make a hard right until you get the trail again.

Protection

A light rack will do.
Get a guidebook, Mountain Project beta was a good start but a well-rounded guidebook would have helped a lot, especially on the descent - we hiked down rather than rapping. Also - there are some pretty gnarly runouts on polished slab, remember always to RESPECT ALL GRADES, and have fun... also - get a guidebook. Oct 2, 2017
The Farley
Idaho Springs
 
The Farley   Idaho Springs
 
I found a pendant/piece of "jewelry" on the route last week. If you climbed this and are missing something like this, let me know. It does not appear of $ value, but it is possibly sentimental. Give a shout if this might be yours.

Happy climbing and cheers. Jul 16, 2017
Chip Loomis
  5.6
Chip Loomis  
  5.6
We did it in three pitches on accident. The pictures that are labelled pitch 1 through 3 most be in respect to the three pitch version. Slightly confusing, since the original beta did not include distances of each pitch and then the contradictory pictures. I am glad for the 70 meter rope on pitch 2. There are single bolts at the top of each pitch, but their locations do not match up with the beta, and only a single bolt. Is that common? Also weird because I always had more difficulty finding a spot to put in gear near the bolt, and I liked other areas instead to build the anchors. Oct 3, 2016
Michael Schneiter
Glenwood Springs, CO
 
Michael Schneiter   Glenwood Springs, CO
 
The anchor on the first pitch has been updated with hardware from the ASCA. Jul 20, 2015
Alex Vidal
Boulder, CO
Alex Vidal   Boulder, CO
I thought this was a fun romp, reminiscent of east face Flatirons excursions of the same grade-range: the major difficulties are encountered on the first pitch, and the rest is easy with short cruxes. The first pitch is quite polished, but the protection is adequate. I am guessing you move right at the pin to maintain the 5.6 grade.

Worth noting pitch three has a nice hand/finger crack variation that I wish would have lasted 200 ft instead of 30.

The descent is pretty benign and intuitive enough for novice adventure climbers. Walk off North, and then drop East when you hit the gully. We on-sighted the descent, and I think it took under 30 minutes. Jun 1, 2015
Annette Rebellato Martinet
Centennial, Colorado
Annette Rebellato Martinet   Centennial, Colorado
Not impressed. While the third pitch was probably the most enjoyable, the first had SO much polish to make even a strong leader very twitchy. The second was so easy as to be a bit boring. The 4th/5th were just to get to the best descent, which was AWFUL, even following the "best descent is to the East" directions. Maybe it just isn't climbed enough for the descent to be decently marked, but after the first three cairns, it was basically guessing and downclimbing the least of the bad options down. The descent really killed any enjoyable part of the climb: loose, scrambly rock and dirt all the way down. Jun 17, 2014
Rich F.
Colorado Springs, CO
  5.7
Rich F.   Colorado Springs, CO
  5.7
Thanks, BJ. Good walk-off advice for future climbers. Wish we had known that so we would have turned right at the top, instead of left :-) Aug 9, 2011
BJ Sbarra
Carbondale, CO
 
BJ Sbarra   Carbondale, CO
 
The best descent is to the East. From the summit, head north until you can pick up a faint trail that follows a mellow gully system through trees. Follow this around to the right, until you are heading east down a prominent gully (also low angled). From here, the way should be obvious, as the trail is fairly worn, with a few spots of downclimbing, and when you hit the aspen grove, make a hard right until you get the trail again. Aug 8, 2011
Rich F.
Colorado Springs, CO
  5.7
Rich F.   Colorado Springs, CO
  5.7
My wife and I climbed this route in three long pitches that used almost all of our 70m rope. We could have done a fourth short pitch up the headwall at the top but just chose to take the 4th class option around to the right.

We followed the route shown in the attached pics. I agree with previous posters in that most of the route is low 5th class, but on the route we took (for the 1st pitch at least), there was at least a couple of insecure (slick/polished) 5.7 moves. So I'd call the first pitch 5.7.

The views are nice, the climbing is mellow -- but neither of us enjoyed the long, tedious downclimb back to the west. Aug 8, 2011
J tot
Tempe, AZ
 
J tot   Tempe, AZ
 
After the first pitch, I only felt like a needed to be roped up for two ten foot sections. Also, I second the route finding skills. The way I went it felt more like a bunch of fourth class. Oct 4, 2010
Tony T.
Denver, CO
Tony T.   Denver, CO
What a fantastic climb! I'm an aspiring trad leader, and this was perfect. The third pitch was either really run out, or I was off route. Regardless, it was very easy 5th class.

A few things to note.

It is a south facing wall, so expect sun all day.

Also, the route is rather tricky to find, but basically the climber's trail that takes you to the base of the wall, takes you to a pretty big dihedral of sorts. Go far right from this. If you hike too far up, you actually end up in a grove of trees and skip the first pitch. There aren't very many pictures of this route, so try and find them, and BRING them! Route-finding skills are a must for this area.

There is the option to "walk" off from the right side after gaining the final big ledge/grove of trees just before the fifth pitch. However, the walk-off is steep at points and you can rappel past the steepest sections from a giant tree. Do this if you are not comfortable down-climbing high 4th/low 5th class 20 foot walls. Aug 26, 2010
Carolyn
Boulder, CO
 
Carolyn   Boulder, CO
 
The crux is just before the end of P1 (right before the tree belay). It's a super insecure, unprotectable 10'-15' crux section that combines stemming, smearing, and crimping. It's polished and slippery - pretty scary for a new trad leader; the good news is you can clip an anchor just before the "business" starts (the pitch to the left ends a double length runner away). Perhaps with offsets nuts you could protect it, not sure.
I actually thought I was off route, it felt a lot harder than 5.6. There's a more straight forward looking crack just to the right (anyone know if that is the actual route)?
The rest of the route is pretty straight forward, more typical of the 5.6 rating. Sep 13, 2009
Lynn S
 
Lynn S  
 
Very enjoyable route, first pitch will make anyone think with the famous Monitor polish. Aug 28, 2009