Type: Trad, 80 ft
FA: Paul Bjork
Page Views: 1,230 total · 8/month
Shared By: JJ Schlick on Aug 31, 2006
Admins: Kris Gorny, chris tregge

You & This Route


9 Opinions

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Description



If you are looking to lead an all natural gear 5.12 at Palisade Head then Ecclesiastes should be on top of your list. Although, to be fair, it’s a pretty short list. This classy line starts with some bouldery and committing moves right off the deck, with a terrible landing below. If you blow it and hit the deck, there’s a good chance you won’t be walking away from it, let alone climbing out. Rough water behind you could certainly put the fear of god in you.

At 15’ you will reach your first good piece of gear, a #1 BD. Above this the crack opens up into a splitter of sorts, with killer positioning and just enough face relief to keep the rest of the route in the .10+ range. You can belay on the ledge or continue to the top with some bigger cams (#2, #3 BD).

At some point in the winter season of 2017/2018 a monster storm swept away the starting boulders, thus changing the nature of the route dramatically. It is reportedly even scarier and harder than before. Although a work around would be to preplace a good, high first piece of gear while you are rapping in, and setup your lead line accordingly. The Head will always be bad place to break a leg or worse.

Location

North Annex

Protection

An assortment of cams, wires.

Photos

Jeff Kolehmainen
Eagan, MN
Jeff Kolehmainen   Eagan, MN
I think the FA was Paul Bjork. Nov 5, 2007
randy baum
Minneapolis, MN
 
randy baum   Minneapolis, MN
 
fun line. crack system in the middle reminds me of the lower section (past the crux, before no hands rest and start of the dihedral) of don't bring a knife to a gun fight.

first good/worthwhile piece is a #1 camalot. after that, takes small cams, mainly red and orange TCU's. above the ledge, takes a #3 and a #2 camalot (or just two #2s). Sep 20, 2009
Taylor Krosbakken
Duluth, MN
Taylor Krosbakken   Duluth, MN
This sounds insane, but the large boulders (can be seen in Kris's photos above) at the base of the climb are no longer there. I guess Superior had other plans for them.

I remembered starting while standing on these boulder and being able to reach the start holds. With the boulders no longer there you effectively start about 4 ft lower making the opening moves quite a bit harder. I was not able to go straight up, but had to start up Praise the Many Seraphim and traverse over, and that was still very hard, maybe V5-6.

I believe this happened during the winter of 2017/2018. So if you have flailed on this climb recently, don't worry its not you.... or at least now you have an excuse. Aug 10, 2018
Kris Gorny

  5.12 PG13
Kris Gorny    
  5.12 PG13
I also saw the bottom boulders are missing -- amazing. The route now has extra few feet for the start on difficult unprotected moves with non-existing footholds. In the past the first piece protecting ground fall could be placed from the ground standing on top of the large boulder (seen in first pic). Now one has to climb past that spot and I think the route is harder and most likely full-on X. Aug 10, 2018
JJ Schlick
Flagstaff, AZ
  5.12 PG13
JJ Schlick   Flagstaff, AZ  
  5.12 PG13
Wow must have been quite the storm! Every good trad crag needs an X rated 5.12. Too bad it’s this one:( A pin or blade is still natural protection:) Aug 10, 2018