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British Trad video of someone yelling "Safe!"

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Shoe Enthusiast · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2019 · Points: 142

I remember an older video I watched where someone topped out a sketchy British trad route and then called down "Safe!" to their belayer. I thought it was Hazel Findley on the E9, Once Upon a Time in the Southwest, but after a rewatch it wasn't that route. It might still be her though. Could be Dave Macleod too.

Does anyone know of that video?

Tim FromMaine · · Maine->Colorado · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 11

Could be Alastair Lee's "On Site"? Pretty sure multiple times they use the "Safe" command. Regardless, if you haven't seen it I highly recommend it. 

Jim Emmons · · Austin · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 5
Shoe Enthusiast wrote:

I remember an older video I watched where someone topped out a sketchy British trad route and then called down "Safe!" to their belayer. I thought it was Hazel Findley on the E9, Once Upon a Time in the Southwest, but after a rewatch it wasn't that route. It might still be her though. Could be Dave Macleod too.

Does anyone know of that video?

Here's a really old one

Not trad, but definitely sketchy

Shoe Enthusiast · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2019 · Points: 142
Jim Emmons wrote:

Here's a really old one

Not trad, but definitely sketchy

I think it was the second one. Thanks all

Tradiban · · 951-527-7959 · Joined Jul 2020 · Points: 212
Shoe Enthusiast wrote:

I remember an older video I watched where someone topped out a sketchy British trad route and then called down "Safe!" to their belayer. I thought it was Hazel Findley on the E9, Once Upon a Time in the Southwest, but after a rewatch it wasn't that route. It might still be her though. Could be Dave Macleod too.

Does anyone know of that video?

They say that all the time.

Why the curiosity?

Shoe Enthusiast · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2019 · Points: 142
Tradiban wrote:

They say that all the time.

Why the curiosity?

I've since adopted the phrase into my own climbing. When I get lowered down from my lowly 60ft sport climb and I'm getting a wedgie from my belayer, I'll say "Safe" so that they know to give me a bunch of slack. Happens a fair bit in the RRG when I'm trying to land on a rock or something. I used to tell people that it was from that Findlay video, but turns out I'm a liar. Now I can say it's from that Whittaker video.

Ignatius Pi · · Europe · Joined Jun 2020 · Points: 13
Shoe Enthusiast wrote:

I've since adopted the phrase into my own climbing. When I get lowered down from my lowly 60ft sport climb and I'm getting a wedgie from my belayer, I'll say "Safe" so that they know to give me a bunch of slack. Happens a fair bit in the RRG when I'm trying to land on a rock or something. I used to tell people that it was from that Findlay video, but turns out I'm a liar. Now I can say it's from that Whittaker video.

It might be a good idea to point out that in the UK 'safe' means the same as 'off belay' in the US - ie "I'm at the top of the pitch/climb, am anchored or otherwise in no danger of falling, so you can take me off belay". Shouting "safe" on reaching the lower-off anchor of a sport route - as an unthinking default rather than an actual 'off belay' request - has been a prime cause of the avoidable 'leader dropped instead of lowered' accident/fatality or near-miss. I think that you're describing something slightly different so this isn't intended as a criticism - rather a heads-up that, as with 'off belay', the term is occasionally used in the wrong circumstance with potentially catastrophic result.

rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 526
Shoe Enthusiast wrote:

I've since adopted the phrase into my own climbing. When I get lowered down from my lowly 60ft sport climb and I'm getting a wedgie from my belayer, I'll say "Safe" so that they know to give me a bunch of slack. Happens a fair bit in the RRG when I'm trying to land on a rock or something. 

This is a bad idea. If I hear "safe" I'm taking you off belay.  "Safe" already has a defined meaning.   Plenty of non-UK climbers have encountered and know this equivalent to "off belay," so if you are counting on American ignorance it is worth rethinking. If you want extra slack, American terminology already provides the term "slack." 

I've always chuckled at the term itself.  In the UK the leader is up on 45 degree heather and is preparing to anchor to a bunch of stakes driven into the dirt and their call to the belayer is "safe?"  Hahaha.

drew A · · Portland, OR · Joined Oct 2018 · Points: 6
rgold wrote:

This is a bad idea. If I hear "safe" I'm taking you off belay.  "Safe" already has a defined meaning.   Plenty of non-UK climbers have encountered and know this equivalent to "off belay," so if you are counting on American ignorance it is worth rethinking. If you want extra slack, American terminology already provides the term "slack." 

I've always chuckled at the term itself.  In the UK the leader is up on 45 degree heather and is preparing to anchor to a bunch of stakes driven into the dirt and their call to the belayer is "safe?"  Hahaha.

I think the OP means that they say "safe" when they're back on the ground. Probably very near the belayer. And they just want the belayer to give slack and remove the belay so they can stand upright without the rope tugging upwards and be able to untie. The climb is over. Everyone is on the ground.

My partner and I say "I got feet" or "I'm on the ground". Just means I'm on the ground and weighting my own two feet and don't need the rope to keep balance anymore. Helps when you've been lowered onto weird terrain.

Pretty low stakes situation. Worst case is a slip and land on your butt. This is literally the most thought I've ever put into this practice that my partner and I do. 

Shoe Enthusiast · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2019 · Points: 142
drew A wrote:

I think the OP means that they say "safe" when they're back on the ground. Probably very near the belayer. And they just want the belayer to give slack and remove the belay so they can stand upright without the rope tugging upwards and be able to untie. The climb is over. Everyone is on the ground.

My partner and I say "I got feet" or "I'm on the ground". Just means I'm on the ground and weighting my own two feet and don't need the rope to keep balance anymore. Helps when you've been lowered onto weird terrain.

Pretty low stakes situation. Worst case is a slip and land on your butt. This is literally the most thought I've ever put into this practice that my partner and I do. 

Yup, I'm on the ground and able to stand without slipping. I don't call Safe when I'm at the anchors.

Kai Larson · · Sandy, UT · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 436

I prefer the French version of "Safe" which is "Secure."   I use "Secure" as the notification that I am in a secure location and you can take me off belay.  I prefer Secure because it doesn't share any vowel sounds or number of syllables with "on belay" or "off belay" or "take" 

Mike · · Phoenix · Joined May 2006 · Points: 2,615
Shoe Enthusiast wrote:

Yup, I'm on the ground and able to stand without slipping. I don't call Safe when I'm at the anchors.

All that really matters is that you & your partner have the same comprehension of climbing terms. However, please understand that if you climb with other people, stating "Safe" means off belay & could lead to some confusion. 

Cherokee Nunes · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2015 · Points: 0

And they just want the belayer to give slack

Slack is SO much harder to pronounce than safe. Thank you god.

Bb Cc · · California · Joined May 2020 · Points: 774

When I want a rest I yell “Slag!”

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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