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NC climbing areas are closed.

Original Post
Matt Dooda · · CARY, NC · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 0

Stay home! Most of the climbing areas in NC are CLOSED.  

SinRopa · · parts unknown · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 30

Pilot Mountain is still open on weekdays...for now.

Mark O'Neal · · Nicholson, GA · Joined Oct 2009 · Points: 2,109

The place we can't talk about is always open

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275

I'll be right there! Thanks for the invite.

Dave Baker · · Durham, NC · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 298
SinRopa wrote: Pilot Mountain is still open on weekdays...for now.

Pilot is also now closed.


https://carolinaclimbers.org/covid-19
SinRopa · · parts unknown · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 30

Slim pickings...  

The Trestle near Kittrell is open (I guess).  Haven't been yet, but I'm headed up there tomorrow or Friday.  

The Trestle · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2018 · Points: 432

Keep that 6ft though.  You don't want to be the one who kills grandma

SinRopa · · parts unknown · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 30

Yup.  Going with my live-in spouse/climbing partner, driving straight there, chasing off any other parties with a sharpened six foot stick clip, etc etc.

Jared Chrysostom · · Charleston, SC · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 5

Is it ok to boulder alone? It’s a little sad, but is it ok?

Joshua McDaniel · · Fayetteville, NC · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 90
Jared Chrysostom wrote: Is it ok to boulder alone? It’s a little sad, but is it ok?

Nope...you could fall and twist an ankle.  SAR would be put at risk to have to come and get you.  Then you would overly strain the healthcare system.  

Jared Chrysostom · · Charleston, SC · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 5
Joshua McDaniel wrote:

Nope...you could fall and twist an ankle.  SAR would be put at risk to have to come and get you.  Then you would overly strain the healthcare system.  

There goes my Friday morning...

The Trestle · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2018 · Points: 432
SinRopa wrote: Yup.  Going with my live-in spouse/climbing partner, driving straight there, chasing off any other parties with a sharpened six foot stick clip, etc etc.

You're doing the lord's work.  Thank you.

SinRopa · · parts unknown · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 30

Fun little area.  Kinda muddy on the south side, but we had the entire place to ourselves, so no worries.

Chris K · · Clemson, SC · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 56

The bald is closed too?

Edit: not planning on going. It’s out of my true local region 

SinRopa · · parts unknown · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 30

According to NCparks.gov, Rumbling Bald access is open, but Chimney Rock is closed.

Tammy Gueterman · · Seattle, WA · Joined Jun 2019 · Points: 0
Joshua McDaniel wrote:

Nope...you could fall and twist an ankle.  SAR would be put at risk to have to come and get you.  Then you would overly strain the healthcare system.  

I don't buy this reasoning. The availability of SAR, EMS, and hospital care on a good day should never cross your mind in a risk-benefit analysis for any climbing endeavor. If your climbing decisions incorporated SAR as a safety net, then by all means cancel that decision and don't make it ever again. If what you are doing that is so risky that you are thinking about the possibility of needing rescue, why are you doing it at all? Did you really have criteria for deciding today is a good enough day to ask someone to risk their life to save you from your recreational activity? Why are you climbing ever?
As far as relying on outside help for the unexpected, any climbing decision that is irresponsible today, was also irresponsible 4 months ago. If you think contacts and transmission cannot be adequately mitigated, then climbing today is no different than before.

Linville is empty AF year round. Don't mess up though.
Berweger · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 0

I think the point of the SAR / EMS analysis is the same reason I'm on my couch instead of climbing: I am young(ish) and in good shape with no risk factors (that I know of). I don't really need to worry about myself too much, but it would suck if I got granny sick. So the point here is not so much that you couldn't get treated or that you're putting SAR at risk per se, but if you need a bed and hospital resources to fix your ankle during a pandemic, you're taking the bed and hospital resources that someone's sick granny needs.

Joshua McDaniel · · Fayetteville, NC · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 90
Tammy Gueterman wrote:

I don't buy this reasoning. The availability of SAR, EMS, and hospital care on a good day should never cross your mind in a risk-benefit analysis for any climbing endeavor. 

"...on a good day...". These present days aren't so good though.  A risk benefit analysis on any day should include all variables.  The availability of SAR and access to medical attention in a given area would certainly be part of my risk assessment planning a climbing venture.  It wouldn't be a big factor in deciding  the risk I am willing to take in a given moment climbing...but it is certainly more of a factor to consider when planning in the present environment.  

But I think you also completely missed the intent of my comment.  I mean..."a twisted ankle" bouldering being a SAR crisis and leading to you taking up the last hospital ventilator wouldn't be a logical risk assessment for the planned activity.
Tammy Gueterman · · Seattle, WA · Joined Jun 2019 · Points: 0
Joshua McDaniel wrote: But I think you also completely missed the intent of my comment.  A mean..."a twisted ankle" bouldering being a SAR crisis and leading to you taking up the last hospital ventilator wouldn't be a logical risk assessment for the planned activity.

Ah I see now. But I've definitely seen the exactly same thing suggested non-sarcastically in the past few days.

JaredG · · Tucson, AZ · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 1
Tammy Gueterman wrote:

I don't buy this reasoning. The availability of SAR, EMS, and hospital care on a good day should never cross your mind in a risk-benefit analysis for any climbing endeavor. If your climbing decisions incorporated SAR as a safety net, then by all means cancel that decision and don't make it ever again. If what you are doing that is so risky that you are thinking about the possibility of needing rescue, why are you doing it at all? Did you really have criteria for deciding today is a good enough day to ask someone to risk their life to save you from your recreational activity? Why are you climbing ever?
As far as relying on outside help for the unexpected, any climbing decision that is irresponsible today, was also irresponsible 4 months ago. If you think contacts and transmission cannot be adequately mitigated, then climbing today is no different than before.

Linville is empty AF year round. Don't mess up though.

Your reasoning about risk seems off to me.  It seems like you're arguing that any given activity is either safe or unsafe, with no in-between.  I would argue that driving 30 miles to the mountains, hiking a mile up a trail to the crag, climbing a few pitches, and maybe taking a few lead falls would *increase my risk* of breaking an ankle, compared to, say, sitting on my couch and watching movies all day. By increasing this risk, I would increase the likelihood of requiring health care resources.  Others have argued that doing so will, in turn, increase the risk that doctors are forced to choose who receives care and who does not in a situation of constrained health care resources.  Some have even argued that this strain could increase the systemic risk of societal collapse.

Joshua McDaniel · · Fayetteville, NC · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 90
Tammy Gueterman wrote:

 If you think contacts and transmission cannot be adequately mitigated, then climbing today is no different than before.

Linville is empty AF year round. Don't mess up though.

Wrong.  Just because Linville is "empty AF"...doesn't mean the hospital you would get taken is "empty AF."

Let me be clear though.  I don't think that means one can't choose to go out and climb.  But if one chooses to climb, they must assess all the risks associated with these COVID19 times we are in and will be in.

I'd still consider multipitching in the gorge if I could...but bouldering alone...mmm...twisted ankle seems too risky to me.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Southern States
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