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Beginner rock climber

Original Post
Ricky Villa · · Corona, CA · Joined 23 days ago · Points: 0

I’m going to Joshua tree to do some climbing this is my first time doing out door climbing. I spend most of my time climbing indoors. I have a good amount of gear. Like the basic, rope, QuickDraw, runners( sling I think is another term for them), and a few carabiner. I know the basic things like belaying, making figure 8, stopper knot, have some what of an idea on making a anchor. What else should I keep in mind? How many carabiners should I take? What’s the way you set up anchor? Any beginner places you would recommend? Any tips that’ll help out? Thank you for looking over this :)
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Update :  So I went with the boys, I did everything I could of done to keep us as safe as possible. I was a little nervous b/c I Was thinking about some of the comments saying it was a bad idea BUT I’m still here alive which means I did everything well enough to see another day hahah but I did do a lot of research (about a month worth of research)before I headed to JTree like for example: reading books, articles, watching videos, and talking to a gym instructor.thank you for your positive comment( those to added a positive comment hahah)  I had a blast with my friends and we all enjoyed ourself.
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But the cute baby puppy I brought with me...... well it DIED! The doctor said it was b/c of all the negative comments people added on the post.

Nat Vorel · · MN · Joined Jul 2017 · Points: 42

Get a book on building anchors. I personally like John Long’s, but there are others out there that are just as good. Read it a bunch, and practice building anchors on the ground so when you get up on the wall, it’s second nature. Also, I’d recommend going with someone more experienced than you who’s been there before. It’ll keep you from wandering around looking for routes because you’re not familiar with the area, and they’ll be able to answer any of your questions about gear and technique. IMO, it’s a necessity to have at least one person who’s very experienced in outdoor climbing with you if you’re new to it. You can also share gear, which is a nice bonus. Other than that, be smart and be safe, and have a fun time!

Josh C · · Somewhere out West · Joined Nov 2010 · Points: 1,120

Climb the Beginner's Route on the Blob and Upper Right Ski Track on Intersection Rock. Both are around Hidden Valley Campground. Both are good beginner trad routes.
I'd also recommend buying the book "The Trad Guide to Joshua Tree." It has a good selection of easier climbs. 

Have fun and be safe.

Cosmiccragsman AKA Dwain · · Las Vegas, Nevada, and Appl… · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 116

I am at a loss for words, but, I guess there has to be a first for everything.

Bill Lawry · · Albuquerque, NM · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 1,696
Ricky Villa wrote: What else should I keep in mind? How many carabiners should I take? What’s the way you set up anchor? Any beginner places you would recommend? Any tips that’ll help out? Thank you for looking over this :)

First time outside?  Nat gave good advise of going with someone experienced. Or hire a guide.  You'll learn a ton with either, much of it life saving.      

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,936
Ricky Villa wrote:  I know the basic things like belaying, making figure 8, stopper knot, have some what of an idea on making a anchor. 

Definitely bring someone along who can teach you what you need to know.

Joe Croson · · Troy, NY · Joined Aug 2019 · Points: 0

Don’t forget your Bluetooth speaker 

Live Perched · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 11

Ricky, Joshua Tree looks disarming because the domes are low and rounded.  Climbing there is hard, the grades are old school stiff (subtract .3 or .4 from gym grades) and the walk offs can be tricky and dangerous.  Beyond that many of the sport routes are old and were established in traditional style so there are far fewer bolts than gym routes. This creates nervy ground fall potential.

If it’s your first time outside, top rope before you lead and don’t lead anything you cannot  see entirely from the ground including the way down.  

Be careful, people get hurt at Joshua Tree.  And have fun.

Kelley Gilleran · · Sacramento, Ca · Joined Sep 2012 · Points: 2,816

Check out plural nouns 

Sam X · · Bend, OR · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 30

I never had a mentor or experienced partner and didn't die. YMMV. Josh isnt the best place if you are new to climbing. Do some research on the walk up topropes before you go.

James W · · Texas · Joined Sep 2014 · Points: 94

You live in Corona, if you want to learn how to build an anchor go to Malibu Creek at Ape's Wall. There you can walk around the back and set up and anchor and preferably have someone there to check you. You could also go to Stoney Point. There'll probably be a million other people there so you should easily find help. JT is not a good place to go for your first time outside.

If you plan to sport climb, just go to Riverside Quarry (might be closed now I'm not sure) and just get used to climbing on real rock. Frustration Creek near Redlands is also an option.

But the smartest thing: I learned to climb, like most everyone else, by making friends who had experience and going first with them.

Matt Himmelstein · · Orange, California · Joined Jun 2014 · Points: 167
Ricky Villa wrote: I’m going to Joshua tree to do some climbing this is my first time doing out door climbing. I spend most of my time climbing indoors. I have a good amount of gear. Like the basic, rope, QuickDraw, runners( sling I think is another term for them), and a few carabiner. I know the basic things like belaying, making figure 8, stopper knot, have some what of an idea on making a anchor. What else should I keep in mind? How many carabiners should I take? What’s the way you set up anchor? Any beginner places you would recommend? Any tips that’ll help out? Thank you for looking over this :)

No, you do not have a good amount of gear, it sounds like you have the bare minimum to top rope.  You don't have anything to make an anchor if there are no bolts up at the top of the route, unless maybe you have enough webbing to sling a boulder.  I assume you don't know how to lead or lead belay, and you have no trad gear, so the vast majority of climbs are not something you can do without someone way more experienced than you.  Look online to figure out how to make a quad anchor and then go to areas that have bolted anchors and top rope away.  Find someone that can show you how to make a top rope anchor using the gear you have, and then have a fun day top roping out there.  

Do yourself a favor and stop by your local climbing store or Nomad Ventures on your way into the park (it is on the corner of the Highway and Park Blvd, across from the JTree Saloon) and buy Todd Gordon's Joshua Tree Sport Climbing book.  It has about 45 pages of top rope climbs, but lots of these will still need gear to build an anchor.  It also has a good section on how to build an anchor, bit again, a lot of that is dedicated to gear anchors, and you have no trad gear.  So look through the book for areas with bolted anchors.  Start out on routes that are at least 2 full grades below what you climb in the gym, and adjust from there.

Kief Manning · · Elgin, AZ · Joined Dec 2017 · Points: 0

Nobody wants to mention the ubiquitous three letters?

Adam Fleming · · Moab · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 315

Hire a guide. You know just enough to get yourself in trouble. A guide would be happy to string up some top ropes for you and help you make the transition to outdoor climbing on your own. 

Matt Wells · · Healdsburg, CA · Joined Jul 2018 · Points: 0

The Eye was my first outdoor route. It was fun! ...but I concur. Hire a guide. Golden State Guiding is legit and affordable.   

John Penca · · North Little Rock · Joined Sep 2018 · Points: 0

Hire a guide.  You can also likely hook up with another party if you tell them up front about your experience. There are climbers out there that don't mind helping someone new to the sport.  Just make sure they know their stuff and are not newer climbers posing to be badass.  A good indication is the amount of wear on their gear.

Based on what you have written, doesn't sound like a good idea to go out and lead your first time outdoors.

Cosmiccragsman AKA Dwain · · Las Vegas, Nevada, and Appl… · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 116
Kief Manning wrote: Nobody wants to mention the ubiquitous three letters?
YGD!!!!!!!!!!!


Bill Lawry · · Albuquerque, NM · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 1,696
Cosmiccragsman AKA Dwain wrote: YGD!!!!!!!!!!!
YGD: Yamaha Guitar Development
YGD: Yamaha Guitar Design
YGD: Youth Government Day
YGD: Yeast Gene Database
YGD: Yummy Gummy Design

;) 
Cosmiccragsman AKA Dwain · · Las Vegas, Nevada, and Appl… · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 116
Bill Lawry wrote: YGD: Yamaha Guitar Development
YGD: Yamaha Guitar Design
YGD: Youth Government Day
YGD: Yeast Gene Database
YGD: Yummy Gummy Design

;) 
"Yer Gonna DIE!!!!!"


Kief Manning · · Elgin, AZ · Joined Dec 2017 · Points: 0

There she is. Thought MP was going soft

Josh C · · Somewhere out West · Joined Nov 2010 · Points: 1,120

I disagree with trying to talk Ricky Villa out of going to Joshua Tree.  Yes, people die at Joshua Tree, but John Long also took a ground fall in a climbing gym. My point is, go, have fun, be smart, and be safe. There are plenty of "safe" climbs there.

Look forward to hearing a trip report Ricky. 

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Beginning Climbers
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