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Taking Care of our Climbing Spaces

Original Post
Sam U · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2018 · Points: 0

I think we should talk leave no trace. I was camping and climbing in the City of Rocks this past weekend with a few friends and we witnessed something not super cool. Later in the night we were waling by another groups site and their fire was still going despite no one being in the immediate area. We figured they were off at the bathroom or up on some nearby boulders looking at the stars so we let it be. However, when we woke up the next morning their fire still had burning embers and was hot to the touch. I hope that most everyone can see the issue in this, even if all the flame is gone, a fire with hot embers can spark up again and when left untended could potentially start a wildfire. This is especially an issue in Northern Utah and Idaho with the vegetation consisting of tall grass, sage, and scrub brush which makes for very fast spreading fires. My point in this story is this, we are incredibly fortunate to have spaces set aside for protection like the City and collectively we need to do a better job taking care of these places we love so much. Even if you put your fires out and pick up your trash, respectfully hold others accountable for their stewardship as well, pick up any litter you can, take the action my friends and I didn't (we did douse the embers in the morning but it had been going all night) and put out fires that are left burning. If not for our enjoyment alone, do it for the inherent value nature has in itself. Happy climbing!

JF1 · · Las Vegas · Joined Jan 2011 · Points: 400

Sam, did actually talk to them?  I think the new Access Fund mantra is be an up-stander not a bystander...  food for thought.  

Nathan Sullivan · · Fort Collins, CO · Joined Sep 2018 · Points: 0

Sounds like they left before he could talk to them...

But yeah, friendly suggestions seem like the way to go here.

Sam U · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2018 · Points: 0
Nathan Sullivan wrote: Sounds like they left before he could talk to them...

But yeah, friendly suggestions seem like the way to go here.
Yeah you're right, we were absolutely going to talk to them but by the time we were up and realized that their fire had been left unattended they were gone. We had full intention to speak to them and were actually keeping an eye out for their cars at the crags that day but unfortunately never had the opportunity to speak to them. Part of the reason I made this post was in the hopes that maybe they would see it and realize the impact they could have had. 


Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Northern Utah & Idaho
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