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Picking Bouldering and Crack shoes

Original Post
Brian Y · · Cleveland, OH · Joined Aug 2018 · Points: 0

Hey everyone! I’ve been climbing for 8-9months now and need a new pair of shoes. I’ve been using the black diamond momentum as my first pair and the toes have blown out on me.

I’m a v0-8 climber now I feel I could be to v10 with shoes that’ll hold the tiny edge better and hurt less when crack climbing. (Buckles on the outside of the foot suck)

Really looking for a shoe that will hold edges and be able to crack climb. Shoes I’m looking at are the:
La Sportiva Finale
La Sportiva Mythos
La Sportiva TC pros (last resort as I’m mainly in the gym)
5.10 Anasazis

The momentum’s were nice as a beginner shoe but now that I’ve progressed a lot and know what kind of climbing I want to do boulder, trad and crack.

Any help or recommendations are welcome!

Noah R · · Burlington, VT · Joined Nov 2018 · Points: 0
Brian Yuhasz wrote: Hey everyone! I’ve been climbing for 8-9months now and need a new pair of shoes. I’ve been using the black diamond momentum as my first pair and the toes have blown out on me.

I’m a v0-8 climber now I feel I could be to v10 with shoes that’ll hold the tiny edge better and hurt less when crack climbing. (Buckles on the outside of the foot suck)

Really looking for a shoe that will hold edges and be able to crack climb. Shoes I’m looking at are the:
La Sportiva Finale
La Sportiva Mythos
La Sportiva TC pros (last resort as I’m mainly in the gym)
5.10 Anasazis

The momentum’s were nice as a beginner shoe but now that I’ve progressed a lot and know what kind of climbing I want to do boulder, trad and crack.

Any help or recommendations are welcome!

I have some Finales and they are super comfy good crack and slab shoes, my go to multi pitch shoes cause they are comfortable. They do not edge very well although to be fair I did not size mine down a whole lot because they're slab shoes anyway. To be fair, I am comparing them to my muiras which edge like a fuckin razerblade and are half a size smaller so not really fair. 


Just try on a bunch of them, I think if you want crack climbing and edging shoes the TCs would be the best option, but its pretty dumb to get a pair of those just to scrape your toe up a gym wall.
M Alexander · · SLO, CA · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 32

Congrats on the crazy progress over less than half a year, thats impressive.

I think you are asking a lot of a single pair of shoes if you would like them to do well at bouldering, cracks, and trad. The miura, if it fits your foot shape, seems to be a good blend, same with something like the katana or otaki. Every brand has its version, the mildly downturned with a stiff forefoot. 

Nick Drake · · Newcastle, WA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 558

You could at least make an effort to make your attempt at trolling remotely funny. 0/10

Russ B · · Salt Lake City, UT · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 56

Lol v8 after 8 months of climbing? What featherbagged gym is this at? 

Brian Y · · Cleveland, OH · Joined Aug 2018 · Points: 0

1. Not trolling
2. Climb Cleveland. grades might be a little on the easy side but when you put in the time and training required you can make good progress. 

James P · · Lynnwood, WA · Joined Apr 2019 · Points: 0
Brian Yuhasz wrote: 1. Not trolling
2. Climb Cleveland. grades might be a little on the easy side but when you put in the time and training required you can make good progress. 

Ahh, climb cleveland, grades must be legit, they know what they are doing:

Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,931
Rd Rnr wrote: That can't be real. Geez.

Cheaper than renting a harness, at least.

Cpn Dunsel · · Over There, But Well Hidden · Joined Jan 2003 · Points: 135

#NotTheOnion

"Climb Cleveland is here for non-climbers to try something new, for very experienced climbers to build their bodies and skills, and for climbers of all levels in between. We are all climbers, but some are just taking a break from it. We all grew up climbing something, even if it was over the railing of a crib or a tree in our grandparent’s back yard. "

Russ B · · Salt Lake City, UT · Joined Jun 2011 · Points: 56

It's gonna be very humbling when you climb outside for the first time. 

Anson Call · · Reno, NV · Joined Jan 2010 · Points: 45

It's been a minute since I've read these forums, so maybe I have lost touch with the level of trolling that goes on here, but GOOD GOD the sass in the replies comes in fast and hard. Brian Y if you've been sitting on your new MP account for two months [Edit: 14 months]just to troll us, I vow to never read these forums again for as long as I live, and I suggest everyone else do the same. If you're not trolling, may god bless you with a chance to climb those routes in Oregon someday, and here's my advice:

Russ B. is right, you'd probably climb v3-4 on your best day at a well-established outdoor bouldering area, but that's ok - climbing can be fun regardless of the grade. If you want to get better, you will, but going from v4 to v5 is worlds easier than going from v8 to v9 and most v10 climbers would send v6-7 barefoot. Shoes won't get you to v10, but 10 years of consistent effort probably will.

As for shoes, bouldering and crack climbing usually call for completely different styles of climbing shoe. If you want one shoe that will do it all, you're going to have to make compromises. Since you mostly climb in the gym, and you're fairly new to the sport, I wouldn't recommend spending $190 on a new pair of TC Pros - you're likely to wear them out quickly, just like you did with the BD Momentums.

Sizing down can help keep your toes pulled together so you can stand on those tiny edges, but sizing down also makes foot jamming more painful. That's the #1 reason most people like to have different shoes for bouldering/sport climbing and trad. There's also differences in the shape - bouldering usually calls for a very downturned, asymmetric shape that allows you to 'toe in' on steep problems. Crack shoes are flatter because trying to jam your toes into a thin crack doesn't work so well when they're all bent up in the end of the shoe. If you need one shoe for everything, you'll have to make serious compromises one way or the other. If I were in your position, and I could only buy one pair of shoes, I would look for a shape that's a little more aggressive than your Momentums, so you can learn to "pull with your feet" on steep overhangs - but don't size them super tight if you still want to be able to jam without crying. The Miuras are kind of expensive, but some people find that a not-too-tight pair of these shoes works pretty well as an all-rounder. You could look for something similar in your price range.

Another point - you have to try on as many pairs as possible. I don't know what your shop situation is in Ohio, but if there is a good local shop that stocks a variety of models, go support them.

My final piece of advice: MP forums were once a good place to ask questions and learn about the sport, but times are changing. Other sources of info have proliferated; MP users are SUPER SALTY, and things only seem to be getting worse. Read REI's blog or any of the 100 other friendlier corners of the web where this info is already accessible, or come with a VERY thick skin.

Alex Holmann · · Atlanta, GA · Joined Jan 2019 · Points: 21

“Climbing for 8-9 months” but has had a MP account for over a year...

David House · · Boulder, CO · Joined Nov 2001 · Points: 216

If this is a troll it is the lamest ever seen.

Anson has some good comments above, I would suggest that you look at eventually having three pairs of shoes:
1. Inexpensive shoes for gym use, maybe get your BD's re-soled which if you haven't worn into the rand will be about half the price of a new pair and they will already be broken in. If you want new shoes the LS Finales are a good value or I like the Scarpa Helix.
2. Crack shoes ("trad shoes") for outside climbs with cracks, edges and slabs in the +/- vertical range. LS Miuras would be a good example, TC pros as well. Flatter fit.
3.  Bouldering shoes would be more aggressively downturned and tighter fit - LS Solutions are popular but there are many shoes in this style. Generally good for overhanging sport climbing as well and you will probably take them off between problems or pitches.

LS Mythos: Having owned these I would say that the only good thing about them is their comfort, they will stretch to fit any shaped foot. But they don't perform as well as other shoes, I think there are usually better alternatives.

As others have said, fit is super important for both comfort and performance.

Don't sweat the grade comments, I actually like the fact that my gym made up their own grading system and claims no correlation with outdoor grades. You'll find the right level of challenge outside or at other gyms quickly.

amarius · · Nowhere, OK · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 20
James P wrote:

Ahh, climb cleveland, grades must be legit, they know what they are doing:

"Climb Cleveland" has area in the basement dedicated to traversing, and practicing clipping draws. Just curious, how were you able to conclude that they do not know what they are doing?
Here is excerpt from their webpage - http://climb-cleveland.com/bouldering/

Mock Lead Walls
We built an area in the basement perfect for building your climbing endurance. The purpose is not to climb up and down, but side to side for as long as you can.
The climbing structures are interconnected so you can link them together to create a continuous climb of 200 feet or more. We even have real rock holds from all over the country to give you the feel of the rock itself.
 
We created two mock lead walls. The easier one enables you to practice 50ft. pitches rated 5.8 to 5.10 and the steeper one to practice 100ft. pitches from 5.10+ to 5.13+. These pitches also link with a big roof structure featuring cracks and boulder holds so that you can mix them to create the challenges that fit your own climbing interests.
We offer ropes and clips to practice your lead climbing as you traverse around the island or the outer wall. We also have a stop watch to track your time. We suggest timing how long you can stay on the wall and then adding 30 seconds – 1 minute every time you climb the traverse.
 

Redyns · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2011 · Points: 60
Cpn Dunsel wrote: #NotTheOnion

"Climb Cleveland is here for non-climbers to try something new, for very experienced climbers to build their bodies and skills, and for climbers of all levels in between. We are all climbers, but some are just taking a break from it. We all grew up climbing something, even if it was over the railing of a crib or a tree in our grandparent’s back yard. "

i think this is great.  why not promote climbing to non-climbers.  shit, besides Steve Harvey and Bone Thugz, what else does Cleveland have going on?

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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