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Thin air - bee alert


Ron Birk · · Boston, MA · Joined Sep 2009 · Points: 3,530
Tom Sherman wrote:
Was able to clean one of those booty pieces at the pitch three belay... Now if only someone could go hacksaw the blue one...

If it was a purple cam at the ledge I know the owner. They asked us to get it back but I was unsuccessful the other day. 

Jonathan Brown · · Salt Lake City, UT · Joined Mar 2019 · Points: 0

In regards to people questioning the ethics/morals of killing a wasp nest:  I'm a bee keeper.  I've had bee hives in my back yard for many years.  I kill wasp nests with reckless abandon and then sleep peacefully that same night.  I actually took out a massive nest this weekend that was in a hollow tube in a fence rail in my pasture.  Wasps are a pest and there is absolutely nothing wrong with killing every last one of them that you can find anywhere near a climbing wall.  

With all of that being said... if it is an actual BEE hive then leave it alone.  Find a local bee keeping group and contact them.  They'll be more than willing to relocate the hive and they'll probably give you some honey as a thank you for helping them find a hive.  

Bumble bees aren't as easily relocated.  They're also way less aggressive than honey bees or wasps though I don't know that they'd nest in cliff walls.  

Mud dauber wasps might build nests on walls but they're solitary and they don't really sting, so no worries there.  

Marc801 C · · Sandy, Utah · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 65
Jonathan Brown wrote: With all of that being said... if it is an actual BEE hive then leave it alone.
This is unquestionably a wasp nest. There have been wasps nesting behind that flake for at least 40 years - probably much longer, well before I climbed in NH.
Ska Ggs · · NorthEast Stuck · Joined Dec 2015 · Points: 65
Jonathan Brown wrote: 
Find a local bee keeping group and contact them.  They'll be more than willing to relocate the hive and they'll probably give you some honey as a thank you for helping them find a hive.  

 

You want a local bee keeper to climb to the middle of P3 and pull out the bee hive, then finish the climb with the bee hive, hike off and give you honey? This sounds absolutely nuts. Do apiarists really have a reputation of being that nice of people?

It is most definitely wasps when I was there last year, same story being retold over and over.
Jonathan Brown · · Salt Lake City, UT · Joined Mar 2019 · Points: 0
Ska Ggs wrote:

You want a local bee keeper to climb to the middle of P3 and pull out the bee hive, then finish the climb with the bee hive, hike off and give you honey? This sounds absolutely nuts. Do apiarists really have that reputation of being that nice of people?

It is most definitely wasps when I was there last year, same story being retold over and over.

It takes a certain kind of crazy to keep bees - I have a friend that wore a kilt the 'proper' way while removing a swarm to prove that bees are docile - and wild bee hives are never in an easily accessible spot.  That being said... I wasn't considering a multi pitch route when I made that suggestion.  It would be quite an operation, but I'd be surprised if nobody said yes.   A few empty 5 gallon buckets & a long knife are all it really takes to remove a hive.  

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Northeastern States
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