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Best locations for a vacation/rental property?

Tony B · · Around Boulder, CO · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 23,404
Karen Hammersmith wrote:

Huh?

An odder comment than Tony B projecting his unrequited feelings for some Elanor chick in a multi-point diatribe or something about 'clipping coupons' - ???

Lol y'all Boulder Boomers are weird - I messed up the birthdate, I'm a millenial

That's a whale of a tale...
From Monterrey to Santa Fe... so be it.
But you'd think a "millenial" would know how to spell it.

Even the critters never liked her.

Tim Stich · · Colorado Springs, Colorado · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 1,482

Amazing story of terror and adventure on the high seas. Or was that story planted by the Valsts Drošības Denests? That's the Latvian intelligence agency in case you were wondering. Hellanor is from Latvia.

Matt Speth · · Denver · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 45
Christian George wrote:


The problem in mountain towns is most often the town government. Ouray is a perfect example, they purposefully keep the town a dump and manage it so that whatever happens, it doesn’t become Telluride. You know, Telluride, where the property values have gone up 200% in 5 years. Whereas in Ouray, house go unsold  for more than 5 years and eventually fall into foreclosure. 
This isn't apples to apples - Telluride also has a world-renowned ski resort and is considered a vacation hub for billionaires.  Ouray is a former mining town where riding around in jeeps and ice climbing in the winter are the activities of interest.  Totally different demographics.

You seem to be suggesting the end of private property rights and advocating communism.

I'm disappointed it took 5 whole pages for the big C word to come out.

Christian George · · Home-yes, Town- no · Joined Jul 2019 · Points: 0
Matt Speth wrote: This isn't apples to apples - Telluride also has a world-renowned ski resort and is considered a vacation hub for billionaires.  Ouray is a former mining town where riding around in jeeps and ice climbing in the winter are the activities of interest.  Totally different demographics.

I'm disappointed it took 5 whole pages for the big C word to come out.

Telluride and Ouray are 11 miles apart. All it would take is a gondola...

Telluride was less of a town than Ouray in the early 1970’s.You see the changes today but don’t realize it was the local government over the last 40 years that caused it. Telluride was run by open minded progressives, Ouray has always been run by the same families since the 1880’s, and they don’t want any change or improvement. So it may be apples and oranges today, but they were apples on the same tree 40 years ago. THAT is the lesson I wished to impart. as for dropping the C bomb, I call it like I see it, and what I see is a generation infatuated with communism. Glad I’ll be dead when that bites them in the ass.
Kevinmurray · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 0

Telluride in the early 70's even when the ski area was just getting started was hardly progressive. The old local's did not like the new hippie liberal influence. People with money and more progressive ideas moved in and things changed. You can bet there are a lot of people that own vacation homes in Mountain Village that are very much right wing conservatives. Ouray has always been constrained by the lack of physical space to grow and be more open minded. It is a jeep and off road area and a lot of those people tend to be more conservative and the town caters to them.True there are a lot of legacy ranchers in the Ouray, Ridgway area but to say that the same families have run the valley since the 1880's is a bit melodramatic, kind of like a 1950's Hollywood movie. Even the Idarado mine company has less influence than it once did.

Never More · · SoCo · Joined Mar 2019 · Points: 0
Kevinmurray wrote: Telluride in the early 70's even when the ski area was just getting started was hardly progressive. The old local's did not like the new hippie liberal influence. People with money and more progressive ideas moved in and things changed. You can bet there are a lot of people that own vacation homes in Mountain Village that are very much right wing conservatives. Ouray has always been constrained by the lack of physical space to grow and be more open minded. It is a jeep and off road area and a lot of those people tend to be more conservative and the town caters to them.True there are a lot of legacy ranchers in the Ouray, Ridgway area but to say that the same families have run the valley since the 1880's is a bit melodramatic, kind of like a 1950's Hollywood movie. Even the Idarado mine company has less influence than it once did.

Agreed. I lived in Telluride in the early 80s. Right when things were changing. When Rasta Stevie was elected to town council. That's when the change started. Soon after Oprah and the rest moved in. 

The gondola is cool. As is Ophir Wall. The rest? Forget it.
Kevinmurray · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 0

Skiing is still real good. Was there today.

Never More · · SoCo · Joined Mar 2019 · Points: 0
Kevinmurray wrote: Skiing is still real good. Was there today.

Can't deny that. They have good snow this year.

Kevinmurray · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 0

On track to be like last year which was unbelievable.

Buck Rio · · MN · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 10

All you Colorado brethren, please stop making me miserable with all of the talk of "Good snow" and "freshies".

I'm stuck in Minnesota with sub zero temps staring me in the face for the next week or so.

End of Feb I am going to Bozeman to ski, then JTree (fingers crossed) in March.

Never More · · SoCo · Joined Mar 2019 · Points: 0
Buck Rio wrote: All you Colorado brethren, please stop making me miserable with all of the talk of "Good snow" and "freshies".

I'm stuck in Minnesota with sub zero temps staring me in the face for the next week or so.

End of Feb I am going to Bozeman to ski, then JTree (fingers crossed) in March.

4 inches overnight, still dumping. 

200+ so far.  Couldn't help myself Buck ;)
Buck Rio · · MN · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 10
Never More wrote:

4 inches overnight, still dumping. 

200+ so far.  Couldn't help myself Buck ;)

Have fun!  Not every year looks like this one.

Mike Walley · · Louisville, CO · Joined Sep 2010 · Points: 280

Lamar

Lauren D Hollingsworth · · Colorado and Kentucky · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 250
Matt N wrote:

Rental properties are another job. You have to put in a lot of time/work or pay someone to. Might as well work OT and invest the cash, unless you want a second or primary job as a landlord. 


That $67k invested in the S&P500 in 1985 would be worth over $2.2m now. 

You can’t get that done while you’re still in your 30s. It’s still just a long-term strategy. 

Tony B · · Around Boulder, CO · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 23,404
Buck Rio wrote: All you Colorado brethren, please stop making me miserable with all of the talk of "Good snow" and "freshies".

I'm stuck in Minnesota with sub zero temps staring me in the face for the next week or so.

You are right.  No good snow down here right now, it's sunny and 50 today.  
We'll probably taunt you again before this weekend, though, since the peaks are getting dumped on again.

J T · · Colorado · Joined Jun 2012 · Points: 300
Matt N wrote:

Rental properties are another job. You have to put in a lot of time/work or pay someone to. Might as well work OT and invest the cash, unless you want a second or primary job as a landlord. 


That $67k invested in the S&P500 in 1985 would be worth over $2.2m now. 

Many people starting out today might start a 401k at 25, but then scale it back so they can buy a house.  Then they are house poor for a while, and don’t resume significant retirement I nvesting until 35 or 40.  So, your argument of 35 years worth of exponential growth is a myth for Gen Y and Z.  Even as a Gen X, I haven’t been able to capitalize on 35 years worth of stock market growth.  Quit comparing what the forgotten generation and Boomers could do, with what the Y and Z can do.  The forgotten generation didn’t even take out mortgages, they paid cash for their houses, and could then start retirement planning at a very young age.

Tony B · · Around Boulder, CO · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 23,404
J T wrote:

Many people starting out today might start a 401k at 25, but then scale it back so they can buy a house.  Then they are house poor for a while, and don’t resume significant retirement I nvesting until 35 or 40.  So, your argument of 35 years worth of exponential growth is a myth for Gen Y and Z.  Even as a Gen X, I haven’t been able to capitalize on 35 years worth of stock market growth.  Quit comparing what the forgotten generation and Boomers could do, with what the Y and Z can do.  The forgotten generation didn’t even take out mortgages, they paid cash for their houses, and could then start retirement planning at a very young age.

I don't think that you are painting a very clear picture either.  It depends on income and spending habits.  Yeah, buy a new car, pay insurance and loans on that, and then you are going to have problems putting savings away.  Eating out all the time is expensive too, as is a $5k bike.  I'm GenX and came from a welfare-reliable family with a disabled mother.  Yet I've had investments since 23, probably mostly owing to being a careful spender and having 4 room mates in a house until I had solid financial footing.  I continued to add to those throughout my house-buying process, which I started at 27.  Several of my younger coworkers are following a similar path, several are not.  The probable outcomes of these courses are predictable.

Let's not say what Gen X and Gen Y/X Can not do.  It's a choice for most of them.

David Rivers · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2008 · Points: 20

Perchance you mean skinflint, vs spendthrift, Tony.

Tony B · · Around Boulder, CO · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 23,404
David Rivers wrote: Perchance you mean skinflint, vs spendthrift, Tony.

Yeah, I got one of those words wrong, but not the other.  I wouldn't say Skinflint. I was still giving to charity... Skinflint is not the opposite of spendthrift IMO.
I would say I was just 'thrifty.'  But yeah, thanks for catching that error.

Karen Hammersmith · · Santa Fe, Nuevo Mexico · Joined Dec 2019 · Points: 0
Tony B wrote:

I don't think that you are painting a very clear picture either.  It depends on income and spending habits.  Yeah, buy a new car, pay insurance and loans on that, and then you are going to have problems putting savings away.  Eating out all the time is expensive too, as is a $5k bike.  I'm GenX and came from a welfare-reliable family with a disabled mother.  Yet I've had investments since 23, probably mostly owing to being a careful spender and having 4 room mates in a house until I had solid financial footing.  I continued to add to those throughout my house-buying process, which I started at 27.  Several of my younger coworkers are following a similar path, several are not.  The probable outcomes of these courses are predictable.

Let's not say what Gen X and Gen Y/X Can not do.  It's a choice for most of them.

I love a man with Huge 403b

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Colorado
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