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New and Experienced Climbers over 50 #7


FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275
Lori Milas wrote:

Well, that's the thing.  Two good climbers called it a "10e".  Is there some new kind of grading of special routes?  Maybe something to do with lots of scrambling and hiking involved?

Or maybe they're both idiots. (But they are seasoned climbers.)  This was an invite.

10e is a joking way of saying 10+.

Cosmiccragsman AKA Dwain · · Las Vegas, Nevada · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 101

5.10e asy

Tim Schafstall · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 1,322

Or just use the old guidebooks when is was rated 5.9.  That will make it easier  

Lori Milas · · Rocklin, Ca · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175

Good lord.    Learning to lead climb in the gym is a real headache.  A feel like a kindergartner again.  This video thing is SO helpful for me... cringe-worthy at times but helpful--so here is the evidence that I screwed up.  I have now climbed 4 indoor routes (2 10c's), ALL perfectly, except... damn, I let the rope slip behind my heel for one nanosecond at the very top of the 4th route.  NO SOUP FOR YOU!     This is, apparently, a serious crime. (Is it for everyone?  And would this be a game-ender outside?)   I felt it, got my foot around the rope... moved on. 

I'm heading for the mountains tomorrow to climb on REAL rock where I can feed my soul and the rope police are not so vigilant.  I need to know how I'm really doing. (Damn. I also miss the desert).
 

Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 658

It’s just a number it’s just a letter no big deal not that important

Russ Walling · · Overlord @ FishProducts · Joined Oct 2004 · Points: 3,426
Lori Milas wrote:

Well, that's the thing.  Two good climbers called it a "10e".  Is there some new kind of grading of special routes?  Maybe something to do with lots of scrambling and hiking involved?

Or maybe they're both idiots. (But they are seasoned climbers.)  This was an invite.

Just means it is a sandbag at 5.10 whatever... beauty of it is the route is industry standard for 5.9.  Yer pals probably struggled on it, thus the "e" rating.  It's a joke rating meaning it is simply hard.


Kinda like Figures on a Landscape... this thing could be called 5.10e... scary and hard moves in a couple spots.  Great route.
Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 658
Russ Walling wrote:

Just means it is a sandbag at 5.10 whatever... beauty of it is the route is industry standard for 5.9.  Yer pals probably struggled on it, thus the "e" rating.  It's a joke rating meaning it is simply hard.


Kinda like Figures on a Landscape... this thing could be called 5.10e... scary and hard moves in a couple spots.  Great 
 I would say figures is more like E- Not really that bad
Greg Opland · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2001 · Points: 272

Steck-Salathe

Bring the big guns. Very physical, old-skool route.
Brutus always claimed that the route was 5.9 until stuff broke off the Wilson Overhang.
Señor Arroz · · LA, CA · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10

Lori, just watch this vintage video and you've got it all handled. Who knows, Constine might even make a cameo in it.


Cosmiccragsman AKA Dwain · · Las Vegas, Nevada · Joined Apr 2010 · Points: 101
Lori Milas wrote: Good lord.    Learning to lead climb in the gym is a real headache.  A feel like a kindergartner again.  This video thing is SO helpful for me... cringe-worthy at times but helpful--so here is the evidence that I screwed up.  I have now climbed 4 indoor routes (2 10c's), ALL perfectly, except... damn, I let the rope slip behind my heel for one nanosecond at the very top of the 4th route.  NO SOUP FOR YOU!     This is, apparently, a serious crime. (Is it for everyone?  And would this be a game-ender outside?)   I felt it, got my foot around the rope... moved on.

I'm heading for the mountains tomorrow to climb on REAL rock where I can feed my soul and the rope police are not so vigilant.  I need to know how I'm really doing. (Damn. I also miss the desert).
 

A fall only takes a nanosecond to happen.

The rope behind your leg will most likely flip you upside down, resulting in smacking the back of your head into the rock.

Wear a Helmet until you get rid of that bad habit. In the gym also.
You always have to be aware of the way the rope is running.
And, everything else around you rather than just focus on just climbing.
Carl Schneider · · Adelaide, South Australia · Joined Dec 2017 · Points: 0
Lori Milas wrote: Good lord.    Learning to lead climb in the gym is a real headache.  A feel like a kindergartner again.  This video thing is SO helpful for me... cringe-worthy at times but helpful--so here is the evidence that I screwed up.  I have now climbed 4 indoor routes (2 10c's), ALL perfectly, except... damn, I let the rope slip behind my heel for one nanosecond at the very top of the 4th route.  NO SOUP FOR YOU!     This is, apparently, a serious crime. (Is it for everyone?  And would this be a game-ender outside?)   I felt it, got my foot around the rope... moved on.

I'm heading for the mountains tomorrow to climb on REAL rock where I can feed my soul and the rope police are not so vigilant.  I need to know how I'm really doing. (Damn. I also miss the desert).
 

It happens.  It's only a game changer if you fall :-)

You're CRUSHING BTW!!!
Lori Milas · · Rocklin, Ca · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175
Carl Schneider wrote:

It happens.  It's only a game changer if you fall :-)

You're CRUSHING BTW!!!

I haven’t experienced doubt on this climbing thing until now. (So thank you for your kind words.). Rewatching video I see everything right until that moment.  This is “mock leading “ so it wasn’t a possibility to fall... and only my second time actually on the wall clipping draws.  But if it can NEVER happen...  I don’t know if I can guarantee that. Sometime, somewhere I could step under a rope for a second. 

I’m going to give this a little more time...
Señor Arroz · · LA, CA · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10
Lori Milas wrote:

I haven’t experienced doubt on this climbing thing until now. (So thank you for your kind words.). Rewatching video I see everything right until that moment.  This is “mock leading “ so it wasn’t a possibility to fall... and only my second time actually on the wall clipping draws.  But if it can NEVER happen...  I don’t know if I can guarantee that. Sometime, somewhere I could step under a rope for a second. 

I’m going to give this a little more time...

Falling with the rope behind your ankle isn't a "Can never happen." It's just a thing you should avoid. 

Carl Schneider · · Adelaide, South Australia · Joined Dec 2017 · Points: 0
Señor Arroz wrote:

Falling with the rope behind your ankle isn't a "Can never happen." It's just a thing you should avoid. 

I was going to say the same thing.  We all make mistakes.  I have a video of me trad leading a grade 21 where I have the rope behind my leg two or three times! The great thing is in the video, my belayer alerts me to it each time, which I see as part of the job of belaying.  

Lori, 'mock leading' is a great way to learn, but it IS possible that on the actual lead something called your logical mind MAY get in the way and cause some issues.  As you are likely aware, the grades that you safely, comfortably, confidently lead (either sports or trad) may be lower than those you top rope.

You're doing great with your climbing, I wish I was still as psyched!

https://youtu.be/eQYf_b7tQfM
Old lady H · · Boise, ID · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 974

Lori, the only fall I've gone entirely upside down on, a tumbling spin, was my very last move the night my gym closed! But, the move I attempted was an all points flying dyno, way up high, and quite past vertical. Falling into empty air. Sooooo fun! Big beery cheering section was definitely a huge plus, I admit it.

Outside, I've been entirely horizontal a couple times, and that, on top rope. Don't sweat this, you are getting great body awareness, just keep dragging that rope along behind you, and that rope and fall awareness will come. You will need to be thinking fall consequences ahead of moving up, preferably before you climb into a predicament. Even on top rope, you can set up a swing into something unpleasant if you are off to the side far enough. A sense of how far you will go will help you judge when you need to back off and fix whatever it is. 

And yeah....road trip. Dunno when, but I do want to meet people, as it can be worked out!

Best, Helen

x15x15 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2009 · Points: 205

Maybe TenS - E is what you heard? But 10c is what was meant?

Harumpfster Boondoggle · · Between yesterday and today. · Joined Apr 2018 · Points: 138

Naw, it's a case of all 5.10 not being equal.

There is Maxine's Wall 5.10a and there is Chingando 5.10a...and the two have never met.

Lori Milas · · Rocklin, Ca · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175

We had a wonderful day at Donner, and I really needed it!  I forget how much sun and rock and friendship brings me back to life.  Was going to practice lead today but it turned out to be a crack day.   I’m feeling more relaxed with heights and altitude (7500 ft). 

Dallas R · · Traveling the USA · Joined May 2013 · Points: 181
Señor Arroz wrote:

Falling with the rope behind your ankle isn't a "Can never happen." It's just a thing you should avoid. 

What Senor said,  whomever is nit picking you about rope over the ankle cannot ever say they have not done the same thing. If they make that claim then they are either lying or ignorant. If you climb anything other than TR it's going to happen, it's not that it happens, it's that you recognize it as a potential problem and do something about it.  

Whenever Barb does that I holler out "Leg", then she knows the rope is behind her leg someplace and fixes it.  
Lori Milas · · Rocklin, Ca · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175

Meanwhile back at the farm... most days it’s fun to
watch truly great climbers moving up expert routes. Yesterday all I could feel was astonishment.  No sense of “I’ll have to work on this at the gym.”   Just “Oh shit! This can be done?”  (5.13 crack to left, 5.12 to right... my crack/arete was a 5.8)  I still laugh when I remember Bob Gaines yelling at me on an arete in Josh “Lori, it’s not a horse! Stand up!”


Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Southern California
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