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Fly fishing Colorado


Original Post
Kyle Taylor · · Broomfield CO · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0

All-

New fly fisherman here. I’m a big mountain biker and climber. After coming across some fisherman on a regular basis being out riding or climbing... I thought I’d give it a whirl and I really dig it!

Being a beginner again at something is always challenging but fun. My question is what advice and what must haves do I need to fly fish regularly in your opinion? I bought a Tenkara 12’ rod kit that came with everything I need to start. Any pointers on what flys to use?

Thanks!!

Malcolm Daly · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 380

Use an Ishigaki Kabari. 

TBlom · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2004 · Points: 360

You're about to open pandora's box!  Careful, it is just as addictive as climbing, and a great rest day activity.  Cold water feels great on sore feet.
You can wet wade in sandals when it is warm enough, but wading boots and a decent pair of waders will end up being 'necessary' if you get into it.
A 9' 5 weight rod will suffice on most waters in the state (to start).  You will want to start lingering around fly shops to glean some crucial beta.  Hiring a guide is not a waste of money (although I happily spent 3 weeks flogging the water before I started catching anything).  Check out the North American Fly Fishing Forum; the amount of information there is huge.  Watch youtube videos for casting technique.  What started as a rest day activity became a full blown hobby for me.  Bass and carp can provide an extra challenge after you figure out trout.
The perfect fly means nothing unless presented properly.  You will get much better information at smaller fly shops rather than big sporting goods stores.
Good luck and welcome to the affliction.  Fishing should be pretty good along the Front Range as temps rise and the water is still cold.  Spring runoff can be tough and dangerous, but you can always head to tailwaters (controlled flows below dams).  Good looking flows on Boulder Creek, South Boulder Creek and the Big Thompson... just sayin!

Colorado flows:
http://www.dwr.state.co.us/Surfacewater/default.aspx

NAFFF:
https://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/index.php

Hatch Charts:
https://www.coloradoflyfishingreports.com/reports/hatch-chart.cfm

Local reports:
http://www.rockymtanglers.com/
https://frontrangeanglers.com/

Knots:
www.animatedknots.com

Top 10 flies for the front range in my opinion:
-tan or black foam hopper
-elk hair caddis
-stimulator
-rusty spinner
-black or red zebra midge
-copper john
-pheasant tail
-prince nymph
-girdle bug
-black, olive, gold, or brown wooley bugger
Nick Votto · · CO, CT, IT · Joined Jul 2008 · Points: 320

Go do a couple days wade guiding with my buddy James Quigley in western Montana, he's been fly fishing since we were about 8, he's an absolute master.  

From what I've heard the Front Range fisheries have gotten totally blown out from the population growth, but a little effort/driving will do the trick.
Good luck! 

Kyle Taylor · · Broomfield CO · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0
TBlom wrote: You're about to open pandora's box!  Careful, it is just as addictive as climbing, and a great rest day activity.  Cold water feels great on sore feet.
You can wet wade in sandals when it is warm enough, but wading boots and a decent pair of waders will end up being 'necessary' if you get into it.
A 9' 5 weight rod will suffice on most waters in the state (to start).  You will want to start lingering around fly shops to glean some crucial beta.  Hiring a guide is not a waste of money (although I happily spent 3 weeks flogging the water before I started catching anything).  Check out the North American Fly Fishing Forum; the amount of information there is huge.  Watch youtube videos for casting technique.  What started as a rest day activity became a full blown hobby for me.  Bass and carp can provide an extra challenge after you figure out trout.
The perfect fly means nothing unless presented properly.  You will get much better information at smaller fly shops rather than big sporting goods stores.
Good luck and welcome to the affliction.
Top 10 flies for the front range in my opinion:
-tan or black foam hopper
-elk hair caddis
-stimulator
-rusty spinner
-black or red zebra midge
-copper john
-pheasant tail
-prince nymph
-girdle bug
-black, olive, gold, or brown wooley bugger

Just the info I needed- thanks! Def like you looking for a “break” from riding and climbing. I thought surely I could find something less active. Guitar has been nice too but I just like being outdoors! Cheers man!

The Raven · · SoCo · Joined Mar 2019 · Points: 0
TBlom wrote: You're about to open pandora's box!  Careful, it is just as addictive as climbing, and a great rest day activity.  Cold water feels great on sore feet.
You can wet wade in sandals when it is warm enough, but wading boots and a decent pair of waders will end up being 'necessary' if you get into it.
A 9' 5 weight rod will suffice on most waters in the state (to start).  You will want to start lingering around fly shops to glean some crucial beta.  Hiring a guide is not a waste of money (although I happily spent 3 weeks flogging the water before I started catching anything).  Check out the North American Fly Fishing Forum; the amount of information there is huge.  Watch youtube videos for casting technique.  What started as a rest day activity became a full blown hobby for me.  Bass and carp can provide an extra challenge after you figure out trout.
The perfect fly means nothing unless presented properly.  You will get much better information at smaller fly shops rather than big sporting goods stores.
Good luck and welcome to the affliction.  Fishing should be pretty good along the Front Range as temps rise and the water is still cold.  Spring runoff can be tough and dangerous, but you can always head to tailwaters (controlled flows below dams).  Good looking flows on Boulder Creek, South Boulder Creek and the Big Thompson... just sayin!

Colorado flows:
http://www.dwr.state.co.us/Surfacewater/default.aspx

NAFFF:
https://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/index.php

Hatch Charts:
https://www.coloradoflyfishingreports.com/reports/hatch-chart.cfm

Local reports:
http://www.rockymtanglers.com/
https://frontrangeanglers.com/

Knots:
www.animatedknots.com

Top 10 flies for the front range in my opinion:
-tan or black foam hopper
-elk hair caddis
-stimulator
-rusty spinner
-black or red zebra midge
-copper john
-pheasant tail
-prince nymph
-girdle bug
-black, olive, gold, or brown wooley bugger

Great info. I have fished every corner of Colorado. The only thing I would add is a Parachute Adams. Easy to see and brings the fish.

My cool down after climbing locally is to walk down to the river and wet a fly.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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