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David Lama, Hansjörg Auer and Jess Roskelley missing


Cris Garcia · · Michigan · Joined Dec 2017 · Points: 5

Deepest condolences to their families...such a horrible reminder of the extream fragility life carries. Whether in a car crash, cancer, climbing etc death always seems to come too soon. RIP Thank You for everything.

CO Climber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2018 · Points: 0
Ziggy Chalkdust wrote: Mounir... they were preceded by many. Alpine climbing has always been for the naive or the nihilistic amongst us. You roll the dice when you play in the mountains.


Yes. 
Boardman, Tasker, Lowe, Kellogg, Boukreev, Lafaille, Mummery, Unsoeld, Buhl, Humar......

Read about the guys who survived. The difference between life and death for House, Messner, Anker, on many trips was razor thin. 
It ain’t all fun and games and Instagram posts Mounir!
Big B · · Sin City, NV · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 1
Philip Carlton · 56 mins ago · Minneapolis, MN · Joined Nov 2007 · Points:                                                                                                                                                                                                   Big B wrote:True^^^(rip) but you could sub Ingrid to make the same point
Should, not could
you're correct
v0 hero · 50 mins ago · North Cascades, WA · Joined Dec 2018 · Points: 239
Her name was Inge Perkins.

sry, knew that...
Tradiban · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2004 · Points: 11,510
Long Ranger wrote: Really sad to hear, if the worst is true. David Lama's climbing style seems so utterly futuristic

These days "futuristic" means certain death. To one-up the past, it has to be taken to an unreasonable level to impress the sponsors and the fans. These people's deaths are all our faults.

mattm · · TX · Joined Jun 2006 · Points: 1,401
Mounir Fizari wrote: Ueli Steck, Kyle Dempster, Scott Adamson, Hayden Kennedy, Ryan Johnson, Marc Andre Leclerc, Tom Ballard, Daniele Nardi, and now David Lama, Hansjorg Auer, and Jess Rosskelley.

Can someone who has been following alpinism for longer than a few years comment if it was always like this? Do the best of the best really die at this rate, or are there just so many now that it seems that way? 

Go listen to the VERY recent 2pt Enormocast with Mark Twight.  He directly address this and it's one of the reasons he stepped away.  

Big B · · Sin City, NV · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 1
mattm wrote:

Go listen to the VERY recent 2pt Enormocast with Mark Twight.  He directly address this and it's one of the reasons he stepped away.  

cool interview...looong but good

Matt S. · · Milwaukee, WI · Joined May 2018 · Points: 0

Horrible news!  I originally found out about Jess via Instagram when he liked my incredibly weak 5.8 TR pic.  I've been following all his posts since!  Incredible dude!

Cris Garcia · · Michigan · Joined Dec 2017 · Points: 5
Tradiban wrote:

These days "futuristic" means certain death. To one-up the past, it has to be taken to an unreasonable level to impress the sponsors and the fans. These people's deaths are all our faults.

Although I agree, a part of me also wants to believe a huge driving factor has to be internal, it has to be for the sake of taking back the eyes filled with boundless potential each one of us once had as kids that some sacrificed to keep... 

Ty Gilroy · · Ontario, CA · Joined Feb 2018 · Points: 5
Cris Garcia wrote:

Although I agree, a part of me also wants to believe a huge driving factor has to be internal, it has to be for the sake of taking back the eyes filled with boundless potential each one of us once had as kids that some sacrificed to keep... 

Eloquently put. Thanks for this

CO Climber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2018 · Points: 0
Cris Garcia wrote:

Although I agree, a part of me also wants to believe a huge driving factor has to be internal, it has to be for the sake of taking back the eyes filled with boundless potential each one of us once had as kids that some sacrificed to keep... 


Anyone who has been caught in an avalanche or actually even experienced one nearby, who’ve been near death in winter storms, who’ve been broken and battered and crawled out of there and wants to come back for round two and three and more is doing it for themselves. 
Shay Subramanian · · Denver, CO · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0
Tradiban wrote:

These days "futuristic" means certain death. To one-up the past, it has to be taken to an unreasonable level to impress the sponsors and the fans. These people's deaths are all our faults.

While I'm sure that plays a part, you don't get to that level just from wanting to impress sponsors and fans...there's drive there.

Tradiban · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2004 · Points: 11,510
Shay Subramanian wrote:

While I'm sure that plays a part, you don't get to that level just from wanting to impress sponsors and fans...there's drive there.

Without sponsors and everyone cheering them on I think it's obvious they would roll the dice less because A. They lack the resources to climb that extremely that often and B. There's less incentive to go big and take big risks.

Long Ranger · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jan 2014 · Points: 316
Tradiban wrote:

These days "futuristic" means certain death. To one-up the past, it has to be taken to an unreasonable level to impress the sponsors and the fans. These people's deaths are all our faults.

Got a boulder for you, 


Matthew Wells · · Healdsburg, CA · Joined Jul 2018 · Points: 0

Extremely sad

Matthew Wickenhiser · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2018 · Points: 0

If anyone is interested in the ultimate alpinist perspective read “Kiss or Kill” by mark twight

Death is part of the alpine and it doesn’t ever get easier to cope with. I had the fortune of talking with Lama a couple months back and he had this youth in his eyes and in his smile that the world needs more of. Thoughts and prayers with all of the alpine community today. 

Robert Rowsam · · Grand Junction, CO · Joined Oct 2012 · Points: 175
Matthew Wickenhiser wrote: If anyone is interested in the ultimate alpinist perspective read “Kiss or Kill” by mark twight

Kiss or Kill is mandatory reading for sure and definitely resonates with me more than much of climbing media. Andy Kirkpatrick's movie has a similar tone too. I wonder if guys like Lama and Hans share this darkness though. In all the interviews I've seen with them, they don't embrace the nihilism and disregard for the living that I see with twight and Kirkpatrick. Do you guys think there are distinct and almost opposite philosophies amongst the Alpine community, or at root are they (we?) all carrying a darkness that leads to these levels of risk acceptance?

Matt S. · · Milwaukee, WI · Joined May 2018 · Points: 0
Robert Rowsam wrote:

Kiss or Kill is mandatory reading for sure and definitely resonates with me more than much of climbing media. Andy Kirkpatrick's movie has a similar tone too. I wonder if guys like Lama and Hans share this darkness though. In all the interviews I've seen with them, they don't embrace the nihilism and disregard for the living that I see with twight and Kirkpatrick. Do you guys think there are distinct and almost opposite philosophies amongst the Alpine community, or at root are they (we?) all carrying a darkness that leads to these levels of risk acceptance?

I'm sure that it develops as you go on.  I can see Lama still riding the youthful optimism.

Joe Manlove · · Sonora, CA · Joined Jan 2009 · Points: 91
v0 hero wrote:

Her name was Inge Perkins. 

Thanks. It bother me beyond belief that the tragic death of such an amazing young woman was so ignored by coverage of HK's suicide. The entire community is poorer for her loss.

Remember too, the trauma continues for the members of SAR who have who have to dig their friends out of the snow.

Chris Joe · · Arcadia, CA · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 72

This is crushing to the soul. It was such a pleasure watching David climb with so much motivation.

abandon moderation · · Tahoe · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 204
Robert Rowsam wrote:

Kiss or Kill is mandatory reading for sure and definitely resonates with me more than much of climbing media. Andy Kirkpatrick's movie has a similar tone too. I wonder if guys like Lama and Hans share this darkness though. In all the interviews I've seen with them, they don't embrace the nihilism and disregard for the living that I see with twight and Kirkpatrick. Do you guys think there are distinct and almost opposite philosophies amongst the Alpine community, or at root are they (we?) all carrying a darkness that leads to these levels of risk acceptance?

Talk comes up about this comes up in his book (or some other). On a trip with Alex Lowe, Mark Twight had his usual dark experience. Afterwards when Alex read what Mark wrote about the trip he said something along the lines "That's what was going through your mind?! We were on completely different trips" By all accounts, Alex Lowe was a cheerful guy until his untimely death. Despite their personal outlooks, they all lost friends to the mountains (and sadly now are the lost friends). I'm sure everyone rationalizes it differently, but it's a unique person who can deal with it and remain positive.


The late Ueli Steck talks about death and some of the risk here: https://vimeo.com/215558694 - First attempt on Annapurna south face he falls 300 meters and survives, next attempt someone dies in a tent with him, but he goes back and ultimately completes it solo. Ueli never seemed very "dark" but clearly he, like others, knew the potential outcomes and had to understand their own reasons to continue climbing.
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