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Edelrid Spoc Vs. Petzl Micro Trax


Original Post
Parker D · · BC · Joined May 2017 · Points: 60

Edelrid have released their version of the Micro Trax called the "Spoc" progress capture pulley (for those who may be unaware).

Noteworthy specs I can find so far are:

Micro Trax - 15kn (breaking strength of device, not rope)
Spoc - 15kn (breaking strength of device, not rope)

Micro Trax - 85 grams
Spoc - 60 grams

Micro Trax - 91% efficiency
Spoc - 92% efficiency

Micro Trax - 8mm-11mm
Spoc - 7mm-11mm

Micro Trax - 25mm sheave diameter
Spoc - 20mm sheave diameter

So I see the Spoc as being lighter, more efficient and can handle skinnier ropes while maintaining the same strength. Not sure how the difference in sheave diameter will play out in my intended use of the device.

My intended use of the device is the same as what I use a Trax for - top rope solo. My questions are... what do you guys think?? Specifically I am very interested to see a pull test with the spoc on a rope to see if it lines up with the micro trax's failure mode of tearing the sheath at around 4kn.

Anybody have their hands on one? What do you think - an improvement on the micro trax or just another manufacturer trying to grab some market share from the gods at petzl?

Tristan Burnham · · La Crescenta, CA · Joined Oct 2009 · Points: 1,796

I have a roll n lock. It weights 80 grams. It’s great for TR solo, but weird as a hauler or ascender because the roll action takes a few inches of rope to lock down. It’s also way cheaper than the micro or spoc. But that spoc looks pretty sweet. 

Caleb Schwarz · · Colorado Springs, CO · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 125


Shawn Adrian · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2018 · Points: 91

Hadn't heard about this new device.  Thanks for posting.

Looks like the teeth on this are more aggressive than the Micro Traxion--not sure if that means it would damage the sheath quicker or not.  But assuming you're using a toothless device as your primary this wouldn't be as much of a concern.

Is the little wire on the Spoc to disengage progress capture mode?  Not sure if I like that.

And how often are you going to be using a rope thinner than 8 mm while TR soloing? : )

The only real advantages seem to be the 25 grams of weight and the $25 cheaper price.  Not sure if either would be enough for me to prefer this to a Micro Traxion, but I think it would definitely work.

 I personally use a  Climbing Technology Roll N'Lock coupled with a Camp USA Lift.  Works great for TR solo for me, but I don't do any big wall climbs so don't really need the haul functionality of a progress capture device (which I've heard is much better with the Micro Traxion).

FosterK · · Edmonton, AB · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 60

I've been looking at picking this up for crevasse rescue and self-rescue applications. The weight and price point are certainly more attractive than the Microtrax. 

Eli W · · New England · Joined May 2016 · Points: 5
Shawn Adrian wrote: 
Is the little wire on the Spoc to disengage progress capture mode?  Not sure if I like that.

It is. For those who wish to eliminate that feature, it seems that it would be easy to clip the wire. Modifying the microtrax in this way is a bit more difficult.

Buck Rio · · MN · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 11

I already have two Microtrax for TR soloing. Looks like 6 of one, half a dozen of another to me...I also own a Grigri.  Too much stuff, so little time.

Jaren Watson · · Idaho · Joined May 2010 · Points: 2,506

I'm with Buck on this one.

I don't see this device as an improvement on the Microtraxion for toprope soloing. The wire seems like less of a reason to go with the Spoc. Yes, it can be removed.

It might be better for glacier travel where 30 grams actually means something.

Caleb Schwarz · · Colorado Springs, CO · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 125

Obviously no one who already has a microtrax should replace it with this.
The question is whether or not someone in the market for a microtrax would have any reason to pay the extra $30 for a device with seemingly slightly lower specs.
(Edited to clarify)

Jaren Watson · · Idaho · Joined May 2010 · Points: 2,506
Caleb Schwarz wrote: Obviously no one who already has a microtrax should replace it with this, but the question is if someone in the market for a microtrax would have any reason to pay the extra $30 for a device with seemingly slightly lower specs.

It's a fair question. For me, I'd need to be convinced that the wire doesn't represent increased risk of locking the device open.

Max Tepfer · · Bend, OR · Joined Oct 2007 · Points: 1,702

If you're using PCPs to belay on a multipitch and/or protect simul blocks, the extra weight savings is actually pretty sweet.  I also like the wider diameter clip in point to allow the carabiner to rotate through the PCP.  Also one possible perk to the cable locking mechanism is that if you're prerigging the PCP on the rope as the leader of a simul block, it might be less prone to engaging mid lead/before you want it to.  It happens all the time with a microtrax when the button gets accidentally pressed while climbing and always spooks me out to think about whipping on the teeth.  Kinda psyched to check these things out! 

Nate Doyle · · Sierra Foothills · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 39

I already own a Micro and Roll N Lock, so I won't be picking up this device. That said, this looks like a nice device.  I'm sure it will get the job done. Consider it and one of the other two devices as your main/backup device. You all run two different devices when TR Soling, yes?

Jake Thomson · · Yosemite · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 5

If you watch the video, that little wire thing that sticks out controls the progress capture....i wouldnt use it for rope solo personally, seems like its easy go capture on your pants or something.

Josh Janes · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2001 · Points: 9,015
Max Tepfer wrote: If you're using PCPs to belay on a multipitch and/or protect simul blocks, the extra weight savings is actually pretty sweet.  I also like the wider diameter clip in point to allow the carabiner to rotate through the PCP.  Also one possible perk to the cable locking mechanism is that if you're prerigging the PCP on the rope as the leader of a simul block, it might be less prone to engaging mid lead/before you want it to.  It happens all the time with a microtrax when the button gets accidentally pressed while climbing and always spooks me out to think about whipping on the teeth.  Kinda psyched to check these things out! 

Max nailed it. Compared to a Micro Trax:

1) Less expensive
2) Lighter
3) Can rotate a locker freely through the clip-in point
4) Rated for smaller diameter ropes (for me this is relevant when hauling a pack with my tiny tag)
5) It appears more intuitive as to which direction to pivot the device open when loading/removing a rope. When I first started using a Micro Trax, it took me awhile before I could instantly recognize which way to pivot the plates. With my Duck I still screw this up.
6) It appears that the end of the cam extends out away from the rope and device a bit more than on the Micro Trax. This will make it easier to grab the cam and open it for moving the device up or down the rope manually without having to take it off the rope.

What remains to be seen (at least for my uses):

1) How smoothly will it feed? It seems like an eyebrow-raising coincidence that the bearing efficiency is a single percentage point better than the Micro Trax. But with a smaller sheave diameter and smaller rope rating, I am skeptical that it will feed as well.
2) Will the little cable be more, or less, likely to cause accidental cam lock-outs than the Micro Trax's button?
3) What happens when it gets wet or dirty or has some wear and tear (my Micro has proven awesome on all counts)?
Nate Doyle · · Sierra Foothills · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 39
Micro Trax - 25mm sheave diameter
Spoc - 20mm sheave diameter
1) How smoothly will it feed? It seems like an eyebrow-raising coincidence that the bearing efficiency is a single percentage point better than the Micro Trax. But with a smaller sheave diameter and smaller rope rating, I am skeptical that it will feed as well.

Speaking of sheave diameter, what's does that mean under the context of this conversation?
Josh Janes · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2001 · Points: 9,015
Nate Doyle wrote:
Speaking of sheave diameter, what's does that mean under the context of this conversation?

Larger sheave = more efficiency = smoother feeding

Nate Doyle · · Sierra Foothills · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 39
Josh Janes wrote:

Larger sheave = more efficiency = smoother feeding

Does a 5mm difference equate to more (or less should I say?) than the 1% efficiency the Spoc has over the Traxion?

Where are the engineering and math nerds when we need them?
adeadhead · · Baltimore, MD · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 97
Josh Janes wrote:

Max nailed it. Compared to a Micro Trax:

1) Less expensive
2) Lighter
3) Can rotate a locker freely through the clip-in point
4) Rated for smaller diameter ropes (for me this is relevant when hauling a pack with my tiny tag)
5) It appears more intuitive as to which direction to pivot the device open when loading/removing a rope. When I first started using a Micro Trax, it took me awhile before I could instantly recognize which way to pivot the plates. With my Duck I still screw this up.
6) It appears that the end of the cam extends out away from the rope and device a bit more than on the Micro Trax. This will make it easier to grab the cam and open it for moving the device up or down the rope manually without having to take it off the rope.

What remains to be seen (at least for my uses):

1) How smoothly will it feed? It seems like an eyebrow-raising coincidence that the bearing efficiency is a single percentage point better than the Micro Trax. But with a smaller sheave diameter and smaller rope rating, I am skeptical that it will feed as well.
2) Will the little cable be more, or less, likely to cause accidental cam lock-outs than the Micro Trax's button?
3) What happens when it gets wet or dirty or has some wear and tear (my Micro has proven awesome on all counts)?

For what it's worth, I accidentally pulled the tab off of the cable. I'm not sure if they made it more structural since then.

JCM · · Seattle, WA · Joined Jun 2008 · Points: 95
Josh Janes wrote:


4) Rated for smaller diameter ropes (for me this is relevant when hauling a pack with my tiny tag)

Have you every experienced problems with the microtrax on skinny lines? Even though it isn't rated for the size, my microtrax has always performed well for light hauling on my 5 mm tagline.


Agree with all of your other points, though.
Josh Janes · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2001 · Points: 9,015
JCM wrote:

Have you every experienced problems with the microtrax on skinny lines? Even though it isn't rated for the size, my microtrax has always performed well for light hauling on my 5 mm tagline.


Agree with all of your other points, though.

No problems down to the smallest I've used (6mm). But because it's rated smaller, I do wonder how it will do at the bigger end (and middle, for that matter) of the range. For example, one of the ropes I use for TR Solo is close to 11mm. Even though the Micro is rated for it, in practice, it doesn't work well. When using that rope I use my Duck instead.

The smoother the feed = less weight needed on the rope. This is important for TR soloing cruxes off the ground/ledges but even more important for traversing and overhanging pitches. Also, a smoother feed = important for simul-climbing situations. Smooth feed is not so important to me for my typical hauling, but if I were hauling big loads it would be with a bigger rope and it would become more important.

Bottom line for me is the only numbers that I really like here are that it weighs and costs less. How it actually performs in the field (compared directly to a Micro) is what I want to know.
Jared Casper · · St. George, UT · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 10
JCM wrote:

Have you every experienced problems with the microtrax on skinny lines? Even though it isn't rated for the size, my microtrax has always performed well for light hauling on my 5 mm tagline.

Indeed, from Petzl regarding the Micro Trax: "Hauling lightweight loads can be considered with most cords, provided that the user dœs a favorable risk analysis in the field."

Source: petzl.com/US/en/Sport/Tests…
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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