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Sport Climbing Kit - Am I missing anything?


Original Post
J.T. Harris · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2019 · Points: 0

So I’m getting my own gear for sport climbing for the first time and so far this is what I’ve got on the list, am I missing anything or do you have any suggestions of something that could be added?

Items marked with * I already own

- 9.4 Climbing Rope
- 12 12cm Quickdraws
- Crag Bag
- PAS
- Cordlette
- 4 Screwgate Carabiners
- Belay Gloves
- Climbing Helmet
- Harness*
- Climbing Shoes*
- Belay Device and Screwgate Biner*
- Chalk Bag and chalk*
- Tape*
- Brush*

Sam Skovgaard · · Tucson, AZ · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 87

That's definitely enough to get the job done, but if you're asking for other ways to spend money, we can help.
Needed: rope bag or rope tarp if your crag bag doesn't have a tarp

Nice to have: 
-A few alpine draws to reduce rope drag on wandering routes
-small adjustable wrench to tighten loose bolts
-"granny draw," a quickdraw with lockers on either end (can quickly set up a good safe top rope with this and one quickdraw)

J.T. Harris · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2019 · Points: 0
Sam Skovgaard wrote: That's definitely enough to get the job done, but if you're asking for other ways to spend money, we can help.
Needed: rope bag or rope tarp if your crag bag doesn't have a tarp

Nice to have:
-A few alpine draws to reduce rope drag on wandering routes
-small adjustable wrench to tighten loose bolts
-"granny draw," a quickdraw with lockers on either end (can quickly set up a good safe top rope with this and one quickdraw)

Ya the bag I’m looking at has a rope tarp built in. I’ll defenitely look into som alpine draws if I ever encounter a wandering route I’d like to do, and I’ll probably set up a top rope anchor with the cord and carabiners. Thanks for the advice, much appreciated!

MorganH · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2010 · Points: 170
J.T. Harris wrote: So I’m getting my own gear for sport climbing for the first time and so far this is what I’ve got on the list, am I missing anything or do you have any suggestions of something that could be added?

Items marked with * I already own

- 9.4 Climbing Rope
- 12 12cm Quickdraws
- Crag Bag
- PAS
- Cordlette
- 4 Screwgate Carabiners
- Belay Gloves
- Climbing Helmet
- Harness*
- Climbing Shoes*
- Belay Device and Screwgate Biner*
- Chalk Bag and chalk*
- Tape*
- Brush*

Gri grid for belay, something else for rappel
ZB 4yr · · Watertown, Massachusetts · Joined Nov 2016 · Points: 0

1 set RPs, 6 wag bags, 2 Yates screamers.  

Ryan M Moore · · Philadelphia, PA · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 35

Ditch the PAS and cordellette and buy two double length nylon runners for half the price. Buy a few feet of cord for a third hand while rappelling. And maybe go to 9.6 or 9.8 for rope, your going to need a new rope before the weight of the rope is affecting your climbing.

England · · ? · Joined Aug 2008 · Points: 270

any respectable sport climber has a stick clip

scott fuzz · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 125

two boarder collies with out leashes-

m Mobes · · MDI, ME · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 905
scott fuzz wrote: two boarder collies with out leashes-

Don't you know, Labradoodles is what everyone is buying now.

David Maver · · Philadelphia PA · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 0

Consider something for a rappel backup. 

andrew.reed · · Louisville, KY · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 35

belay specs

Blake Neville · · Lexington, KY · Joined Aug 2017 · Points: 57

+2 more lockers for the PAS and third hand

Honestly... buy an extra pack of 5 while you're at it. You can never own too many lockers imo. You'll use them at some point if not need them. And like others said, definitely get a thicker rope. Anywhere 9.8 to 10.2 is a pretty good range. Gives you good bit of wiggle room when you're hitting that learning curve and you're rubbing your rope in all the wrong ways outside.  I suggest that because it does sound like you also want to set up top ropes which will put a bit more wear on it.  Might even want to invest in 2 steel biners to run the rope through up top if that's the case.

What kind of belay device do you have?

Attentive Follower · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2018 · Points: 0

bluetooth speakers

Kelley Gilleran · · Sacramento, Ca · Joined Sep 2012 · Points: 2,800
Ryan M Moore wrote: Ditch the PAS and cordellette and buy two double length nylon runners for half the price. Buy a few feet of cord for a third hand while rappelling. And maybe go to 9.6 or 9.8 for rope, your going to need a new rope before the weight of the rope is affecting your climbing.

Seriously. Good advice.

Buck Rio · · MN · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 11

A rope tarp, doesn't need to be fancy. I also like to have a crazy creek chair to lounge on for comfort, but that is just me...I also bring a small piece of carpet to wipe my shoes on before I climb if they have any sand or dirt on them.

Jake Jones · · Richmond, VA · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 1,729

+1 for a stick clip.  Also, you don't need a PAS, two runners or anything else to clean a typical sport anchor, other than an extra quickdraw, and a locking carabiner.
FForward to the 3:10 mark to see what I'm referring to.


edit:  Also, a small adjustable crescent wrench for tightening loose hangers.  You don't need to crank on them when you find them.  Just enough to snug the hanger back to the rock, then maybe another 1/4 turn.  You'd be amazed at how many comments I see from sport climbers that say something like "found a loose hanger on _____ route".  This is something that any avid sport climber can and should fix.  As long as you don't go hog ass wild tightening the nut, 99 times out of 100 it's simply the nut working loose over time and can be fixed pretty easily.  
Marc H · · Longmont, CO · Joined May 2007 · Points: 255
J.T. Harris wrote: Am I missing anything?

A trad rack.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 523

If this is your first rope, consider getting something a little bit thicker because you're likely to beat it up while you learn how to take better care of it. Also get around 3 or 4 feet of 5mm accessory cord to tie into prusik loops and learn how to use them. You'll also want something to use as a foot loop, this could be the alpine draws you are already getting, a double length runner, or another length of accessory cord.

If you're really short, it can also be handy to have a "stiffy" draw that you can use to extend your reach a little bit to get the bolts that are just a few inches out of reach from a good stance or clipping hold. 

Old lady H · · Boise, ID · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 969

A really trusted belayer who knows how to belay a lead is the primary piece of gear for me. Or, a rope gun. :-)

Second getting a longer, stiff draw (or pair) with lockers, to set up for others to top rope your awesome rope gunning. If you invest in the carabineers with the steel inset, for the rope side, you'll save a lot of aluminum on your rope.

Depending on where you climb, you may well want to also have a bit of gear with you. Routes bolted in the 1990s can be pretty interesting.

Best, Helen

Adam Ronchetti · · Madison, WI · Joined May 2011 · Points: 25
J.T. Harris wrote: So I’m getting my own gear for sport climbing for the first time and so far this is what I’ve got on the list, am I missing anything or do you have any suggestions of something that could be added?

Items marked with * I already own

- 9.4 Climbing Rope
- 12 12cm Quickdraws
- Crag Bag
- PAS
- Cordlette
- 4 Screwgate Carabiners
- Belay Gloves
- Climbing Helmet
- Harness*
- Climbing Shoes*
- Belay Device and Screwgate Biner*
- Chalk Bag and chalk*
- Tape*
- Brush*

I would do a 9.8 rope (60m). Maybe even a 10.1. Depends how many falls you plan to take on it. The larger diameter the rope has the more falls it can take... but the heavier it is. It's a trade off. I'd replace 4 of those quickdraws with alpine draws. I've only neede the extend on sport routes a handful of times. But when I had to I was thankful for the ability to do so. I'd recommend having a basic ATC for rappelling after cleaning and a second belay device (ATC guide, xp, or gri gri) for actually belaying. 

Jake Jones · · Richmond, VA · Joined Jul 2011 · Points: 1,729
Adam Ronchetti wrote:

The larger diameter the rope has the more falls it can take

This isn't true.  It can be true, but isn't always.  UIAA falls are largely, but wholly dependent upon rope diameter, and another big contributor is the dynamic elongation of the rope.  The less dynamic property a rope has, usually it'll take fewer UIAA falls.  There are sub 10mm ropes out there that take more falls than ropes > 10mm.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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