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Eastside/Bishop poor stewardship guide.


Maureen Maguire · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 0

OR is going on right now.  This year I'm not there. What I'd like to know is who is there now to bring the corporate advertising problems to the front. Access Fund is there but they have their hands full. Can't count on AAC because theirs is to brand their stoke and get more membership money. At least someone should stop by Prana's booth and find out who needs to hear about it

Maureen Maguire · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 0

Also Bishop Area Climbers Coalition is hosting a Town Hall on February 13 Wednesday 6:30 pm at the Into Arts Center. Objective is to discuss access at ORG.  This would be a good place to be to start on a concerted effort for solutions.
https://bishopclimbers.org/events/

Harumpfster Boondoggle · · Between yesterday and today. · Joined Apr 2018 · Points: 138
Maureen Maguire wrote: OR is going on right now.  This year I'm not there. What I'd like to know is who is there now to bring the corporate advertising problems to the front. Access Fund is there but they have their hands full. Can't count on AAC because theirs is to brand their stoke and get more membership money. At least someone should stop by Prana's booth and find out who needs to hear about it

Problem is that Access Fund is reactive mostly rather than proactive. This is only to be expected as they are only human with full dance cards.

I would think the groups active in ORG, BCC(?) would be the ones to be proactive.

But I really don't know who the players are.

I'd get Katie Lambert and Ben Ditto involved as their social media is already conscious of the issues there.
Allegra Davis · · Bishop, CA · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 20

Now we’ve got companies like prana showing people that this is the way to camp in the eastern Sierra

MacksWhineturd · · Squaw · Joined May 2016 · Points: 0

California has some of the most amazing natural wonders on the planet.  If you want to climb big walls in the valley, ski magnificent couloirs, hike deep for amazing alpine climbing, or get down with world class bouldering - you can generally take your pick of it with less than a five hour drive from anywhere in the state.  The ease of access, the speed at which people can transport themselves from their concrete jungles to the "wilderness", aids and abets them in their thrashing of said "wilderness".  

It's unfortunate that California has about 40 million people living in it, but that's the reality.  

The vast majority of that 40 million are living in huge cities.  These are the folk who come to the "mountains" to get away from it all, but who then proceed to shit all over the place.  The folks who pick their dog's shit up in a plastic bag, but then leave it on the side of the trail to be forever preserved...  The folks who camp right below the "no camping" sign.  The folks having that massive campfire throwing sparks a hundred feet up in the middle of August...

People don't respect what they don't know.  

How do you instill a respect for the wild places of our state in the throngs of people marching up from the Bay Area and LA?
I don't know...  
More signs?  More rangers?  More regulation?  More education?  More social media shaming?  

Start with the social shaming man!!

EvanHyatt · · Santa Ana · Joined Aug 2014 · Points: 0

id say make it illegal to park at the base of things on a weekend and run a weekend shuttle service or increase the hike in. hate to say that. people less inclined to camping at the crag as they would immediately be seen as a problem. Might deter some of the none diehards from climbing. (just spitballing here, please don't rip me a new one) but we should start figuring out a way to protect this for years to come. I'm referring to a zion scenario. Can't trust humans to have a conscience of there impact on this world, look at where we're at with global climate change. We have major changes in our current weather pattern, and nobody cares to come up with a solution. We will just drive this baby till the wheels fall off and be stuck in a desert starving too far from destination crag wondering what happened. Mainly because our population is out of control, and he's eating cake, but that doesn't mean we all deserve cake. Wear and how do we draw the line

Warriors · · Rock City, GA · Joined Sep 2015 · Points: 310
EvanHyatt wrote:  Wear and how do we draw the line

I think I'm going to start with Prana clothing...

O · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2011 · Points: 65
EvanHyatt wrote: id say make it illegal to park at the base of things on a weekend and run a weekend shuttle service or increase the hike in. hate to say that. people less inclined to camping at the crag as they would immediately be seen as a problem. Might deter some of the none diehards from climbing. (just spitballing here, please don't rip me a new one) but we should start figuring out a way to protect this for years to come. I'm referring to a zion scenario. Can't trust humans to have a conscience of there impact on this world, look at where we're at with global climate change. We have major changes in our current weather pattern, and nobody cares to come up with a solution. We will just drive this baby till the wheels fall off and be stuck in a desert starving too far from destination crag wondering what happened. Mainly because our population is out of control, and he's eating cake, but that doesn't mean we all deserve cake. Wear and how do we draw the line

Zion is a National Park. None of the areas listed are a national park and very unlikely to become one.

Climbers Visit these areas and very few other people, so this leaves little reason for anyone to find a shuttle. This leave more issues (bathrooms, water, pad shuttle, etc). 
The next issue is that where will these people stay then in a spot already dealing with overcrowding and limiting the places even more. It will just pass the overcrowding away to places out of the main climbing areas.  
Mark Frumkin · · Bishop, CA · Joined Feb 2013 · Points: 11

If you are going to start with Prana than go to that picture press angry & tell them why.

Jaren Watson · · Idaho · Joined May 2010 · Points: 2,506
Mark Frumkin wrote: If you are going to start with Prana than go to that picture press angry & tell them why.

Good advice. I just posted a comment on Prana’s page, as well as on the photographer’s page.

I bet we see a retraction soon, which will be a good start.
Jaren Watson · · Idaho · Joined May 2010 · Points: 2,506
brian burke · · santa monica, ca · Joined Nov 2013 · Points: 145

this recent post from the bishop area climbers coalition seems like a worthy addition to this topic.

Colby Wangler · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 211
Allegra Davis wrote: Now we’ve got companies like prana showing people that this is the way to camp in the eastern Sierra

Social media seems to be a huge point of toxicity involved with this issue. Everyone wants to achieve their own version of the “perfect adventure” or whatever other social brownie points they can get via posting online. Geo tagging locations is also adding to the increased abuse and traffic. 

A Potter · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2017 · Points: 0

Prana deleted their post thanks to some intense backlash in the comments. That's a win, but I don't think "social media shaming" in general is the best course of action. It works in this type of situation, when a popular brand posts something so obviously harmful (and by all means people should keep doing this), but it won't work when a random van is parked where it shouldn't be, or when someone leaves human feces with scattered toilet paper. Sure, someone popular can post a picture of it, but there are few situations where the individual could even be identified, and the audience for the post would mainly be people who are aware of these issues in the first place, not the city dwellers romping around for the weekend.

For instance, the Bishop Climbers post about wet rock is great, but I just overheard people headed to the tablelands to "see if the rock is dry and climb something". Monitoring these areas is probably a lot like baby-sitting a mischievous child. If you try to put a movie on for them as a quick fix so you can do what you want, next thing you know they're terrorizing the kitchen or drawing on their face. If you engage them and put in the energy to participate with them, you can make a positive connection that makes them a better child in the long run while preventing chaos. That's what we need, right?

It's really easy to get worked up on social media and post a shaming picture or rant. Volunteering time and energy is much harder, but most worthwhile endeavors are.

Also: what about a "wet rock" sign that goes up during or after rain, reminding people that they should wait, eliminating that "we didn't know any better" excuse? 

Tradiban · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2004 · Points: 11,510
brian burke wrote: this recent post from the bishop area climbers coalition seems like a worthy addition to this topic.

Whoa, whoa WHOA?!?! 24h to climb on granite?!?!! This bullshit has gone too far!

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275

When did climbing on wet granite become a problem? I think not.

Eric Carlos · · depends · Joined Aug 2008 · Points: 40

Holds do break, but in granite or volcanic rock, they are not porous and the water doesn't weaken the bonds like wind deposited sandstone.  

Fehim Hasecic · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 155
Tradiban wrote:

Whoa, whoa WHOA?!?! 24h to climb on granite?!?!! This bullshit has gone too far!

Haven’t you heard? Due to the global warming and increased quantities of carbon in the air, granite is becoming so porous that it’s loosing strength tenfold. It’s weaker than Creek sandstone after rain. That’s why we’re so ahead of the times in CO and already have signs posted at each granite crag to abstain for 24 hours from climbing otherwise the public shaming will ensue!

Fehim Hasecic · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jun 2013 · Points: 155
brian burke wrote: this recent post from the bishop area climbers coalition seems like a worthy addition to this topic.

By the way, what’s going on in this picture? I thinks it goes to prove that boulderers are at the bottom of intelligence pyramid in climbing 

Cryin Sheridan · · Western US · Joined Jan 2019 · Points: 1
PosiDave wrote:

They seem to really not give a shit. There was a large group a few weeks back that were trying to poach a camp spot on private property. Rolled up and told them they shouldn’t be camping there and if they were, they should totally put out their fire and try to keep it stealth. They basically told me to get f*cked and that I don’t own the property so I shouldn’t care what they do. 

The sad part is my friends found their social media accounts and they are coaches at gyms teaching the new generation. Who with these issues won’t have access to a lot of places after overuse/abuse.

You east side boys are soft, they try that down at woodson and well i don't have to tell you how that would turn out nawmean? locals only or something similar.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Northern California
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