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New and Experienced Climbers over 50 #5


Lori Milas · · Joshua Tree, Ca · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175

It’s an astonishingly beautiful morning here. I can hear the coyotes yipping in the distance, North Star shining bright.

But in two hours we meet to start this Anchors class and I don’t remember a single thing. (Ok... the triple Fisherman’s knot I remember). I have a 30 pound bag of ropes, carabiners and cordallettes to lug along...for what?  I hope he’s patient and I don’t have to claim Alzheimer’s for an excuse.

No matter how far I get in this climbing thing...it seems I am daily shown what a beginner I am. Humility! It’s all I got...

My attempt at a Munter Hitch with a Mule Knot and overhand loop backup. Somethings wrong here...figuring it out. 

Suburban Roadside · · Abovetraffic on Hudson · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 1,804


...   I HAD A LOT OF FUN  ...


TOLD YOU SO!

Old lady H · · Boise, ID · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 883

Lori? That humility might save your life. It isn't just the "knowing", it's remembering you can never know all of it, and even then, there are total surprises you've never seen before that can pop up.

So stoked for you!!! It's great you are meeting such great people. I am very much looking forward to my turn!

Carl? And squeak (???) I found the wombat!

The toy stuffed one from my hubby's travels twenty years ago. Our "little" boy asked for it, if it showed up. I think I'm keeping the boomerang though. He'll have to wait for that!

:-) H.

Señor Arroz · · LA, CA · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10
Lori Milas wrote: My attempt at a Munter Hitch with a Mule Knot and overhand loop backup. Somethings wrong here...figuring it out.

If it makes you feel any better, if someone asked me to tie a muenter with a mule knot and overhand loop backup I'd just stare at them like a mule. 

Carl Schneider · · Adelaide, South Australia · Joined Dec 2017 · Points: 0
Old lady H wrote: Lori? That humility might save your life. It isn't just the "knowing", it's remembering you can never know all of it, and even then, there are total surprises you've never seen before that can pop up.

So stoked for you!!! It's great you are meeting such great people. I am very much looking forward to my turn!

Carl? And squeak (???) I found the wombat!

The toy stuffed one from my hubby's travels twenty years ago. Our "little" boy asked for it, if it showed up. I think I'm keeping the boomerang though. He'll have to wait for that!

:-) H.

Oh cool. You know, I've never seen a wombat in the wild. Or a platypus. Seen an echidna though. 

Carl Schneider · · Adelaide, South Australia · Joined Dec 2017 · Points: 0
Señor Arroz wrote:

If it makes you feel any better, if someone asked me to tie a muenter with a mule knot and overhand loop backup I'd just stare at them like a mule. 

Same here. All I know is a figure 8 and a clove hitch and a double fisherman's thingy what'sit... 

Señor Arroz · · LA, CA · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10
Carl Schneider wrote:

Same here. All I know is a figure 8 and a clove hitch and a double fisherman's thingy what'sit... 

Good thing you've got Velcro shoes...

John Barritt · · OKC · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 1,084
Señor Arroz wrote:

Good thing you've got Velcro shoes...

Too cerebral apparently.....I gave it a thumbs up tho.... ;)

Lori Milas · · Joshua Tree, Ca · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175

I feel life returning. Not to overstate but I didn’t realize how low I’d gotten this winter.  I needed sun and some laughter and maybe a little challenge.

It was a great Day 1 of building anchors and just having a groovy time.  Setting cams and nuts, learning to equalize cordalettes and slings, tethering In with kleimheist, rapping from gri gri. Tomorrow will put it into practice.

If there’s a problem it’s that every single rock in every direction is begging to be climbed. I want to rope up and go.

The instructor, Chris, splits his time between Donner/Tahoe near me, and Josh. I could spend the summer learning the rocks in my own mountains. I think this qualifies as “climbing somewhere besides Joshua Tree”.   

Dallas R · · Traveling the USA · Joined May 2013 · Points: 181
Lori Milas wrote: I think this qualifies as “climbing somewhere besides Joshua Tree”.   

Welcome to my world.  But in the correct mathematical equation you redefine Joshua Tree as a variable then you get to fill in the name, like Smith Rock, Red Rock, COR, RMNP, Lolo Nat'l forest, etc. etc. etc.  


Having trouble with Barb, she worked her way out of the duck tape, I had to zip tie her.  I think she may be getting better.
Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 150

So I have not climbed with a rope for about a year (at least before that I'd join some harder top roping sessions with a few Gunkies I know) and have not lead anything trad for way longer. It's like always "why would I go through all that fuss if I can do a boulder problem 5 feet off the ground?". Maybe I should sell my gear and call it or I'll regret it later?

Dallas R · · Traveling the USA · Joined May 2013 · Points: 181
Nivel Egres wrote: Maybe I should sell my gear and call it ...

Or not! One of the great values of Rock Climbing/bouldering is the diversity.  Multi-pitch trad climbers will probably never understand the thrill of winning a gym climbing contest, and vice-versa.  There are many paths to be pursued, the one that you like is the best one. 

Nivel Egres · · New York, NY · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 150
Dallas R wrote:

Or not! One of the great values of Rock Climbing/bouldering is the diversity.  Multi-pitch trad climbers will probably never understand the thrill of winning a gym climbing contest, and vice-versa.  There are many paths to be pursued, the one that you like is the best one. 

I am not planning to give up all-together, it's that I find that bouldering is the best form of climbing for me, both outdoors and indoors. It's convenient (no need for a partner, I got plenty of pads), it's challenging yet easily accessible etc. Simply thinking that my trad gear is collecting dust and someone might use it.

Señor Arroz · · LA, CA · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10
Nivel Egres wrote:

I am not planning to give up all-together, it's that I find that bouldering is the best form of climbing for me, both outdoors and indoors. It's convenient (no need for a partner, I got plenty of pads), it's challenging yet easily accessible etc. Simply thinking that my trad gear is collecting dust and someone might use it.

Send it to Lori!

David Kerkeslager · · New Paltz, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 138
Nivel Egres wrote: So I have not climbed with a rope for about a year (at least before that I'd join some harder top roping sessions with a few Gunkies I know) and have not lead anything trad for way longer. It's like always "why would I go through all that fuss if I can do a boulder problem 5 feet off the ground?". Maybe I should sell my gear and call it or I'll regret it later?

Since this is the >50 thread: one thing rope climbing has going for it is that it's easier on the joints to fall on rope than pads. Lots of older boulderers (oulderers?) become trad climbers with age. There's no reason to not accept yourself for being a boulderer, but maybe depending on how far off you think joint issues are, it's worth keeping the trad gear so you can be a crusty trad dad when your body no longer tolerates bouldering.

dragons · · MWV, NH · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 666
Nivel Egres wrote:Maybe I should sell my gear and call it or I'll regret it later?

Define "later": tomorrow, or 5 years from now? Even if you sold it, it doesn't sound like it would be a serious regret. There are two factors to consider: 1) Would it be nice to de-clutter by getting rid of stuff you haven't used in a year and see no future use for? 2) How much would it cost you to buy your current rack all over again? $1K-$1.5K or so?


If you can fairly easily replace the rack later (like 5 years down the road), then I'd say just sell it.
Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 627

Just remember bouldering at the age of 50 and older it takes longer to heal a broken ankle or other broken items!  56 I’ll stick with the rope bouldering very occasionally 

rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 526

At 68 I ruptured my ACL jumping a modest distance onto a pad.  I jumped from a wide stem, landed with my legs still far apart, my right angle rolled inward a bit, and pop went the ACL.  With operation and rehab, it really took a year to get better, although I was back leading easy climbs after seven months.  I decided that was the end of my bouldering career...

Dallas R · · Traveling the USA · Joined May 2013 · Points: 181

I have fallen a lot in my life; I fell out of my crib, I fell out of my bed, I fell off my tri-cycle, I fell of my bicycle, I fell off some horses, I fell off of some cows (do not let teenagers get alcohol to soon in their lives),  I fell out of a pickup truck, I fell out some trees, I've fallen off of the swings and slides, I have fallen off of bar stools, I have fallen off of motorcycles, I have fallen while skiing (water and snow). The Army wanted to teach me how to fall out of aircraft but I wasn't buying into that.  

So when it comes to falling off of a piece of rock I gotta say I really like my 34% stretch rope and harness.  I have pretty much given up falling onto hard surfaces as a bad habit.

Lori Milas · · Joshua Tree, Ca · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 175

Dallas, you both are sounding better! I’m SO happy about this!  

Funny you should mention a dynamic rope. I now have instructions to go pick up a static rope for anchor making and semi-static rope for top roping. I learned a hard lesson when trying to project a short crack in the Sierras on my stretchy rope and every time I fell off that crack I’d list on down to the ground. I felt like I was on the other end of a rubber band. It was so frustrating to loose the few painful inches I had gained and have to do it all again. So next time a static rope for short toprope projects.   
So more ropes for me and now a rack. It was seriously too cool to have two full days of close instruction to rig up everything from tiny vertical cracks to boulders...and now everything looks like something to tie up.  What I didn’t know was that each of us would have their own style...their own eye for what to rig and how to pull it off.  
Bob called last night and he said maybe I’d like to just move on into the lead class today, skip climbing with him. I thought this was a no!  He has not encouraged this for me at all. But the truth is I’m saturated with information and was looking forward to some pure climbing time.  I’ll be back soon and ready for the next step.  Funny my emotional take on Bobs call was one of sadness. Is he pushing me out into the big world?  I don’t want to lose him or any of the folks I’ve come to know and bond with. I enjoy the salmon sandwiches and talks almost as much as the climbing.   

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Southern California
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