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New Ice jacket


Original Post
jselwyn · · Grand Junction, CO · Joined Jan 2011 · Points: 40

My Knifeblade had been delaminating worse and worse, so I finally returned it. Patagonia doesn't really have anything that seems comparable so looking at other options, while I'm back to using my 12 year old Ready Mix. I have a hardshell that I rarely wear in winter. Gamma MX is too warm and takes forever to dry out. What are people using and liking, good combo of wind/dripping/wet snow protection and breathability? 

Nodin deSaillan · · Boulder · Joined Mar 2013 · Points: 80

I have liked the Patagonia Galvanized Jacket. they kindly added 2 inches to the sleeves, which were too short. Do they make that jacket anymore? 

Gavin W · · Langley, BC · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 181

TNF claims to have a new fabric that has hardshell-level waterproof ness with soft shell-level breath ability. All conjecture at this point though, they just unveiled it at CES.  

AlpineIce · · Upstate, NY · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 255

If you can find an Arc'teryx Alpha Comp Hoody in your size, it's a great option. Soft-shell in the torso and Gore-Tex in the shoulders, hem, top of the arms and hood for drippy conditions.  It's super breathable as the softshell portion is very thin.   Arc'teryx discontinued the jacket and currently only makes the Alpha Comp Pants.

NorCalNomad · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2011 · Points: 120
jselwyn wrote: My Knifeblade had been delaminating worse and worse, so I finally returned it. Patagonia doesn't really have anything that seems comparable so looking at other options, while I'm back to using my 12 year old Ready Mix. I have a hardshell that I rarely wear in winter. Gamma MX is too warm and takes forever to dry out. What are people using and liking, good combo of wind/dripping/wet snow protection and breathability? 

Black Diamond Dawn Patrol Hybrid if you can find one used. 3 Layer in the back, shoulders, and arms.

But idk laminated softshells aren't my jam. 3L gtx or non laminated softshell for me.

Jared Chrysostom · · Charleston, SC · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 5

They don't have the best image among climbers, but Eddie Bauer makes a jacket with a WPB laminate on the shoulders/chest/hood and softshell everywhere else. I have been pleased with the "First Ascent" branded stuff I own.

https://www.eddiebauer.com/product/mens-sandstone-shield-hooded-jacket/38832262​​​

bearded sam · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2011 · Points: 145
AlpineIce wrote: If you can find an Arc'teryx Alpha Comp Hoody in your size, it's a great option. Soft-shell in the torso and Gore-Tex in the shoulders, hem, top of the arms and hood for drippy conditions.  It's super breathable as the softshell portion is very thin.   Arc'teryx discontinued the jacket and currently only makes the Alpha Comp Pants.

This. And I’d buy the pants if you have any space on your credit card. 

GearGuy 316 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2017 · Points: 0
AlpineIce wrote: If you can find an Arc'teryx Alpha Comp Hoody in your size, it's a great option. Soft-shell in the torso and Gore-Tex in the shoulders, hem, top of the arms and hood for drippy conditions.  It's super breathable as the softshell portion is very thin.   Arc'teryx discontinued the jacket and currently only makes the Alpha Comp Pants.

The Arc'teryx Procline Comp Jacket looks very similar to the Alpha Comp Hoody, with "nearly" waterproof Gore Windstopper and highly breathable softshell used under the armpits and middle back.

Charles Proctor · · Somerville, MA · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 75

I personally think that membraned softshells (gore windstopper, etc.) are dumb. I owned the knifeblade for awhile and found it not very breathable, not waterproof, and heavy. The fit was perfect though. My go to ice shell now is the Rab stretch neo which is Polartec Neoshell. I find it slightly more breathable than the knifeblade while being significantly more waterproof and lighter. On nicer days, I use a non-membraned softshell (the Mammut Eisfeld Light) but it's not great if things are really drippy. That's my two cents!

Brian Abram · · Celo, NC · Joined Oct 2007 · Points: 674

There is no fabric besides Power Shield Pro that matches its breathability to water resistance, but as you've seen, the fabric doesn't last forever. Power Shield Pro when new has a hydrostatic head of 5000mm and air permeability of 2 cfm. That reduces to 3000mm after 10-20 washes and remains there for the life of the fabric (which may not be much longer than 10-20 washes!). Neoshell starts out at a 10000mm hydrostatic head and air permeability of 0.5 cfm that reduces to 5000mm HH after 10-20 washes.

I can't vouch for it, but here is another option made from Power Shield Pro:

https://www.66north.com/us/men/jackets/vatnajokull-mens-softshell-jacket/?item=K11167-441

You might consider trying one of the newer spun fabrics like OR's Ascentshell or Neoshell or waiting on the coming Futurelight from North Face. They don't have the same stretch and soft hand of Power Shield Pro, and they are not as breathable, but you might like them. OR's old Realm is my shell, and my wife uses the newer Interstellar.

vermaine · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2012 · Points: 10

I have the interstellar from OR and have ski toured and ice climbed in it when necessary (heavy wet snow and wind). It breathes ok, for a hardshell. has a bit of stretch. is light at 11oz I think, and has a good feature set. but it is a hardshell and I don't wear it unless I have to. Ice climbing I usually wear a Pata Levitation hoody and throw the alpine houdini on for wet routes/wind/snow.  touring I wear a BD alpine start hoody. it is a houdini like windshirt.

generally, i get away just fine with the levitation hoody. it does not have a membrane so nuking wind and wet will penetrate. But i have been fine getting dripped on and snowed on provided its below freezing. membrane softshells just dont do it for me in Northern New England where most climbing/touring days are far below freezing, so liquid precip is not the main concern. I find a thin burly nonmembrane softshell and a waterproof just in case layer gets far more use in far wider condition ranges than a windstopper or lamianted softshell. even the neoshell/ascentshell type jackets are still hardshells; still not breathable. still not stretchy or comfortable or abrasion resistant enough for my tastes. most of the time, you don't really need a hardshell...

jselwyn · · Grand Junction, CO · Joined Jan 2011 · Points: 40

Thanks for the suggestions. I looked at the Interstellar and similar, but ultimately can't do hardshells unless it's raining. None really breathe that well. I can get by without a membrane, but tough to figure out what materials are like without seeing them in person. I typically use a ferrosi for ski touring unless it's really nuking, but the hood doesn't work great with a helmet and it's overall wind/light precip protection is lacking. Something a bit more protective but similar would do alright, but what is that? Arcteryx Gamma LT hoody?

bearded sam · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2011 · Points: 145
Gavin W · · Langley, BC · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 181

I have a Marmot ROM that I actually love, use it for ski touring. Uses Windstopper in the shoulders and hood, and a Ferrosi-like non-membrane softshell material in the rest of the body. Stays breathable, with just enough wind/precip protection for my uses.

AlpineIce · · Upstate, NY · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 255
Charles Proctor wrote: I personally think that membraned softshells (gore windstopper, etc.) are dumb. I owned the knifeblade for awhile and found it not very breathable, not waterproof, and heavy. The fit was perfect though. My go to ice shell now is the Rab stretch neo which is Polartec Neoshell. I find it slightly more breathable than the knifeblade while being significantly more waterproof and lighter. On nicer days, I use a non-membraned softshell (the Mammut Eisfeld Light) but it's not great if things are really drippy. That's my two cents!

Agreed, 100%. membraned sofshells don't breath very well, they're not waterproof (for the lack of air permeability) and they take forever to dry.  I bought into the Windstopper softshell jacket idea years ago and realized I was just hauling around a super heavy "hardshell" that stays damp and doesn't pack down well at all for no reason.

Gavin W · · Langley, BC · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 181
AlpineIce wrote:

Agreed, 100%. membraned sofshells don't breath very well, they're not waterproof (for the lack of air permeability) and they take forever to dry.  I bought into the Windstopper softshell jacket idea years ago and realized I was just hauling around a super heavy "hardshell" that stays damp and doesn't pack down well at all for no reason.

I can see that. I do think they're great for pants though, just enough protection from wetness and just breathable enough.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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