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Supplements?


La MoMoface · · Arvada, CO · Joined Apr 2008 · Points: 60
Michael Mueller wrote:

Thanks for the more informative, less trolly response. 

No one was trolling you. I have a, er, reputation for eating poorly, but you very quickly reach a point where you can't out-train a bad diet. Even if you're a picky eater who doesn't like to eat well, you can't take a pill to make up for it. Just cover it in salt and force it down.

Detrick Snyder · · Michigan, for now · Joined Jul 2012 · Points: 140

I highly recommend you seek resources to help you eat and climb better, whether that's a nutritionist, dietitian, book, blogger, instagram - it doesn't matter as long as they're helping you find a way to eat better that works for you (read: less processed foods).   I've worked with college athletes before, they like deep fried food and sugar and I tell them "those supplements don't do sh*t for you if you don't have a halfway decent diet". Start with setting a good baseline, and then some of the supplements and techniques listed above (collagen, creatine, omega-3s, BCAAs, carb and protein timing) may help help you to optimize.

To your question though, a position statement on supplements for athletes from the IOC:  https://journals.humankinetics.com/doi/full/10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0020 

Jer · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 26
Chris Hatzai wrote: Because i know a lot of vegans who crush the rock pretty hard. Every body is different. Seek out professional who can custom tailor a nutriton plan to your diet.. coming on here and asking that kind of advice is like Web MD’ing yourself.. too many (non professional) opinions.

Maybe you know vegetarians who crush since you don't appear to know the difference... Do you have a hypothesis as to why none of the strongest people in the world are vegans? The world's strongest man competition has been going since the 70s, could you name a champ or even finalist who was not a meat eater at the time?

edit to reply to below:
Chris Hatzai wrote: Haha, opinions, like assholes.

yes, we have a different opinion as to the definition of "vegan". Follow Alex for 10 minutes and you'll hear him talk about how he picks his diet to be better for the world and I respect his activism. I don't want to imply I look down on people for their ethical diet choices. If you think vegans don't take a performance hit I offer the people who have skin in the game (those who make a living from athletic performance) as contrary evidence.
Jer · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2015 · Points: 26
Ryan Pfleger wrote:

Strongman competitions? I know nothing about them, but a quick Google reveals 105kg class overhead keg lift, and yoke walk world record belong to a vegan. Best American male Olympic weightlifter at the last few Olympics is vegan. If we want to continue making absurd claims, and extrapolate one off anecdotes into generalizations on a vastly different sport, then considering that vegans account for about 0.5% of all Americans then veganism must give you a huge power advantage. 

But everything I just wrote is pretty much useless. As is what you wrote.

The truth is that humans can thrive on a pretty wide range of diets. Listen to the folks here if you want, some have some good information.  But also do your own research. And then figure out what works for you. 

if you read the post I replied to he says diet doesn't affect performance. I offered a counter argument to that claim with the assertion about the strongest people in the world since I reckon the people who perform at the highest levels are worth investigating. Brian Shaw probably warms up with the 105kg record.

Chris Hatzai · · Bend, OR · Joined Sep 2015 · Points: 606
Jer wrote:

Maybe you know vegetarians who crush since you don't appear to know the difference... Do you have a hypothesis as to why none of the strongest people in the world are vegans? The world's strongest man competition has been going since the 70s, could you name a champ or even finalist who was not a meat eater at the time?

Haha, opinions, like assholes.

Ryan Pfleger · · North Lake Tahoe, CA · Joined Sep 2014 · Points: 20
Jer wrote:

if you read the post I replied to he says diet doesn't affect performance. I offered a counter argument to that claim with the assertion about the strongest people in the world since I reckon the people who perform at the highest levels are worth investigating. Brian Shaw probably warms up with the 105kg record.

Maybe YOU should read the post you replied to. What they said was, "whatever food* you're eating, it's doubtful it'll affect performance." And they have a great point! Based on the OP's tick list, they are falling on 5.8 and 5.9 routes. Even Brian Shaw probably has a strength to weight ratio sufficient to climb many 5.9 routes. But if you think Brian Shaw is anything more than anecdotally relevant to a conversation about climbing then you may have some serious cognitive deficits. 


Oh yeah. THIS is Brian Shaw. If you have him around, you can probably dispense with a stick clip as he can likely throw a 150lb person to the first bolt. However, if you want him to follow you up a 5.11, I hope you know how to rig a 5:1 pulley.

Mike McKinnon · · Golden, CO · Joined Aug 2003 · Points: 65
Michael Mueller wrote:

Thanks for the more informative, less trolly response. My main issue with food is veggies. I can tolerate some but don’t get nearly enough. I eat probably 50/50 for processed and non processed foods. I’ve just really never consciously eaten. I just eat when hungry and what sounds good. 

I’ve been doing hangboard at home for fingers 2-3 days a week along w core. When I lift I usually do 2 days of lowish weight and high reps and 1 day of kinda heavy but still not max. Also climbing 3-5 days per week w rests thrown in. I know I’m not gonna be sending 5.13 anytime soon but I do want so see some gains, even if minor.

Look up myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. As a climber you want to focus on myofibrillar. This is heavy weight and low reps. It allows you to get stronger without the accompanying increase in mass. 


Olympic lifters focus on myofibrillar because it allows them to lift as heavy as possible why staying in the lightest wieght class.< 5 reps
Body builders focus on sarcoplasmic because they get huge and swoll. 8-12 reps

It is always helpful to understand how muscles get stronger. 
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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