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Sickness and Rest Days


Original Post
JNE · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 2,035

This is a question for all the trainers out there with lots of data, climbing or otherwise: If I am working out regularly with built in rests (for example going for 6 to 8 weeks and then taking a week off), and I get sick at some point and need to take a week off, does this count as real rest?  For simplicity sake lets pretend it happens right at the end of week 7, and that it is something which had little to no effect on my diet and was a minor illness overall. After I am healthy again, am I rested up and ready to go back to training as if I just took a regular week off?  

George Foster · · Durango, CO · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 2

Are you a robot, requiring a reboot? If so, yes.  Otherwise it will depend on your illness, genetics, nutrition, etc.  I would say play it slow.  Steve House shares experience in TFTNA about coming back too hard too quickly and paying the price in extending and worsening the illness.

One thing it definitely is NOT is a scheduled rest week.  The body is not adapting and recovering, it's fighting and surviving.  

Listen to the body and play the long game. One more week of slow or no training is preferable to getting set back a month with a respiratory infection or the like 

Tradiban · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2004 · Points: 11,460
JNE wrote: This is a question for all the trainers out there with lots of data, climbing or otherwise: If I am working out regularly with built in rests (for example going for 6 to 8 weeks and then taking a week off), and I get sick at some point and need to take a week off, does this count as real rest?  For simplicity sake lets pretend it happens right at the end of week 7, and that it is something which had little to no effect on my diet and was a minor illness overall. After I am healthy again, am I rested up and ready to go back to training as if I just took a regular week off?  

Keep training no matter what. A week is way too much rest anyway.

If you are getting sick you are probably undernourished. 
JNE · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 2,035
George Foster wrote:One thing it definitely is NOT is a scheduled rest week.  The body is not adapting and recovering, it's fighting and surviving.  

I wonder about this.  As far as I am aware the periodic rests are there primarily for neurological recovery in order to avoid CNS fatigue.  Thus I am curious if that would be something which recovers during a mild illness.  

Marc801 C · · Sandy, Utah · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 65
Tradiban wrote:

If you are getting sick you are probably undernourished. 

Every time you post something outrageously incorrect and plain idiotic, you manage to outdo yourself within a couple of days, like this gem.

Maybe refrain from posting when you clearly have no idea of what you are talking about?
England · · ? · Joined Aug 2008 · Points: 270
Marc801 C wrote:

Every time you post something outrageously incorrect and plain idiotic, you manage to outdo yourself within a couple of days, like this gem.

Maybe refrain from posting when you clearly have no idea of what you are talking about?

Wow! Nutrition is key to staying healthy, and recovery. It's good advice, and something to take a minute to review in your training. I hope you feel better today. Best wishes.

Tradiban · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2004 · Points: 11,460
England wrote:

Wow! Nutrition is key to staying healthy, and recovery. It's good advice, and something to take a minute to review in your training. I hope you feel better today. Best wishes.

Marc just likes to attack anything I say but never seems to have a counter-point, just hate.

For anecdotal evidence, I never get sick despite a pretty "dirty" existence. I believe this comes from my diet. It's a fad right now to basically starve yourself of certain food groups which results in most people becoming undernourished which compromises the immune system.

If the OP is getting sick his immune system is compromised. I've seen long rest periods result in sickness because the body has issues dealing with change. This is not a scientific observation but it was common among the athletes in my circle.

My advice to the OP is to eat a more rounded diet, limit rest days to 2 consecutive, and track his resting heart rate to show how tired he is.
Marc801 C · · Sandy, Utah · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 65
England wrote:

Wow! Nutrition is key to staying healthy, and recovery. It's good advice, and something to take a minute to review in your training.

That's true. It also isn't what trollhard said - he attributed causality, applied to everyone, which just isn't true.
JNE · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 2,035
Tradiban wrote: I never get sick despite a pretty "dirty" existence.

If we amend this to Reality and say you rarely get sick, I can agree with it.  I get sick only every couple of years, and then only mildly.  I imagine this is because I eat a balanced diet of ~4000 calories a day.  I have recently had to add an extra hamburger on nights I work out in order to get recovered.  This is in addition to about 150 grams of protein every day.  As a result your advice will be ignored.

Also, if you are actually training at your limit, periodic rests are necessary to avoid CNS fatigue.  That you rarely get sick, but 'train' as often as you do, tells me everything I need to know...

Mike D · · Boulder, CO · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 844
Tradiban wrote:

Keep training no matter what. A week is way too much rest anyway.

If you are getting sick you are probably undernourished. 


Or you have kids...
Eric Engberg · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2009 · Points: 0
Mike D wrote:


Or you have kids...

Or at least a real life outside of la-la land

Tradiban · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2004 · Points: 11,460
JNE wrote:

If we amend this to Reality and say you rarely get sick, I can agree with it.  I get sick only every couple of years, and then only mildly.  I imagine this is because I eat a balanced diet of ~4000 calories a day.  I have recently had to add an extra hamburger on nights I work out in order to get recovered.  This is in addition to about 150 grams of protein every day.  As a result your advice will be ignored.

Also, if you are actually training at your limit, periodic rests are necessary to avoid CNS fatigue.  That you rarely get sick, but 'train' as often as you do, tells me everything I need to know...

I can't remember the last time I was actually sick, it's been at least 10 years, seriously. You are the one getting sick, so who has the problem?

Oh, and I redefine my "limit" with my training. I think you could benefit from this approach. Get a heart-rate monitor and this will become clear.
Mike D · · Boulder, CO · Joined Oct 2015 · Points: 844
Eric Engberg wrote:

Or at least a real life outside of la-la land



Truth. It must be nice to have no contact with anyone else at any time.

I'm just coming off a cold that I picked up from my son, who picked it up from daycare at the climbing gym while I was training.

Of course, I still ran 10km with that cold on Wednesday, and still climbed last night near my current limits...

And since my current heart rate is within a few beats of my resting rate, I must not be sick...   
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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