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Yet Another Bolt Remover


Chris Little · · Albuquerque N.M. · Joined Jul 2017 · Points: 0

It's probably to late now, but you should have patented your idea. You could then have these things made in a reputable shop, with quality controls. But the important thing, with the whole economy of scale concept, they could be made cheaply. Just my two cents worth. But I think it's a great idea and I salute your not caring about a profit.

Alex R · · Golden · Joined May 2015 · Points: 17

Has anyone ever tried using a locksmith's core puller to pull bolts? It looks to be functionally nearly identical to the design in this thread. It isn't as optimized to the task of pulling bolts, namely a little short, but has the advantage of being off the shelf. 


Nate Doyle · · Sierra Foothills · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 39

We looked into the Greenlee hydraulic punch driver but, it's like $700+. We also considered the Chinese knock for around $180. But this tool is better adapted to the job for a number of reasons (lighter, removable handle, replaceable parts and more.) Plus, it just looks so damn cool. It's been working great so far.

I'm fairly certain that Core Puller couldn't manage the job, to be honest and this for a number a reason. One major reason is it would have to be adapted to work (it's way to small too) and this assuming it actually had the streagth to do the job (I'm skeptical.) By that time (time and money spent) you might as well just get the YABR and be happy.

MorganH · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2010 · Points: 170

We've been using Hurley Jr's to pull the sleeves and nose-cones from 5-piece expansion bolts, too. We thread a piece of threaded tool steel into the coupler and thread that into the sleeve, after tapping threads into the sleeve. Then switch to a different coupler/rod for the nose cone. It's a lot cleaner than funking them out, but still a bit of a pain. If the surface is not pretty level, the threaded rod tends to bend and ruin threads and quickly becomes useless. It would be cool to figure out a way to allow the end of the tool to self level with the bolt hole to prevent bending forces.

Nate Doyle · · Sierra Foothills · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 39
MorganH wrote: We've been using Hurley Jr's to pull the sleeves and nose-cones from 5-piece expansion bolts, too. We thread a piece of threaded tool steel into the coupler and thread that into the sleeve, after tapping threads into the sleeve. Then switch to a different coupler/rod for the nose cone. It's a lot cleaner than funking them out, but still a bit of a pain. If the surface is not pretty level, the threaded rod tends to bend and ruin threads and quickly becomes useless. It would be cool to figure out a way to allow the end of the tool to self level with the bolt hole to prevent bending forces.

I was thinking about that little red piece I mentioned up thread being on two pins so it had a tiny bit of play. Not sure how that would work, if it would cause other issues or if it wasn't just a silly "shower thought", and why I didn't bring it up. Also, I think it fits half way on the silver tube so it would have to be redesigned. 

cleatis · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2012 · Points: 75
Nate Doyle wrote:

I was thinking about that little red piece I mentioned up thread being on two pins so it had a tiny bit of play. Not sure how that would work, if it would cause other issues or if it wasn't just a silly "shower thought", and why I didn't bring it up. Also, I think it fits half way on the silver tube so it would have to be redesigned. 

Hey Nate,

Not silly at all.  I've pondered making the front interface piece a bit larger, and having three or four tapped holes on its edges.  You could then use screws to 'level' out the front interface.  Might be worth trying out.
Gregger Man · · Broomfield, CO · Joined Aug 2004 · Points: 1,321

I have wondered if a hemispheric end piece could work. Wide bases bother me by not supporting the rock around the bolt and encouraging blow-outs as the business end exits the hole. If the front were a tight hemisphere it might work, but I don't know of a simple way of manufacturing that.  

MorganH · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2010 · Points: 170
cleatis wrote:

Hey Nate,

Not silly at all.  I've pondered making the front interface piece a bit larger, and having three or four tapped holes on its edges.  You could then use screws to 'level' out the front interface.  Might be worth trying out.

That, and an SDS chuck to switch between tools, and you'd have the ultimate bolt puller.

cleatis · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2012 · Points: 75
Gregger Man wrote: I have wondered if a hemispheric end piece could work. Wide bases bother me by not supporting the rock around the bolt and encouraging blow-outs as the business end exits the hole. If the front were a tight hemisphere it might work, but I don't know of a simple way of manufacturing that.  

Greg, that is a very interesting idea.  I'll ask my machinist to ballpark a price on such a piece.

Nate Doyle · · Sierra Foothills · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 39
cleatis wrote:

Greg, that is a very interesting idea.  I'll ask my machinist to ballpark a price on such a piece.

Would it make sense to have both pieces? Or could this new idea kill the old version? I realize there is cost associated in making both and more thought/design into accounting for both but, just a thought (one which I admittedly haven't thought through.)

Gregger Man · · Broomfield, CO · Joined Aug 2004 · Points: 1,321

I have a plan to machine the end cap from some aluminum 1.5" x 1.5" x 0.25" wall tubing without too much effort:

  • lop off a 1" long piece
  • lop off one wall
  • drill a 0.75" hole in the end - should capture the square nut but not the coupling nut
  • drill four small holes for screws (large enough to slide thru the aluminum, tapped into the steel)
  • round the end by hand on the belt sander once it's attached
  • make a similar, non rounded cap for the top end that the needle thrust bearing can sit on
mattm · · TX · Joined Jun 2006 · Points: 1,401
cleatis wrote:

I've sold all of them!  I've had a few people since then want one, so perhaps another run is justified if I can get enough numbers.  I'll make a list and put you on it.

Keep us posted.  I'd likely be interested as as well

Nate Doyle · · Sierra Foothills · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 39
Gregger Man wrote: I have a plan to machine the end cap from some aluminum 1.5" x 1.5" x 0.25" wall tubing without too much effort:
  • lop off a 1" long piece
  • lop off one wall
  • drill a 0.75" hole in the end - should capture the square nut but not the coupling nut
  • drill four small holes for screws (large enough to slide thru the aluminum, tapped into the steel)
  • round the end by hand on the belt sander once it's attached
  • make a similar, non rounded cap for the top end that the needle thrust bearing can sit on

Not sure if it being rounded or flat, like before, will be better (without testing) but, either way, this design, with its smaller flusher hole on the bottom and its 4 points of connection, seems like it would be a nice upgrade. 

One thing to consider about the smaller hole is  the length of the screw shaft (not sure the correct term) is less than the length of the square tubing that house it. That is, you can back it out (rotate/screw it) a bit too far and it goes inside. With the current design it's not a big deal, it can pass the square red piece no problem. Just screw it back down a rotation and it's out and good again. With a smaller, more flush, hole, like I see in the new design, one would have to be very careful not to pass the red piece, as then it might be difficult to get alignment again and the screw shaft out of the hole again.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Fixed Hardware: Bolts & Anchors
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