Mountain Project Logo

New and experienced climbers over 50 #4


dragons · · MWV, NH · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 666
ErikaNW wrote:

I really want to go to NH to do some of those slabs.

ErikaNW, if you're ever in the NH area, PM me, and we can do some multipitch slab climbs together.

Ditto to Lori. Dallas R, IIRC you said you're planning on NH this year. PM me when you're in the neighborhood and my bf and I will do some climbing together with you and your wife.

Last time I led Sliding Board, I actually slid down a few feet on the 5.7 bit. That was educational lol   
dragons · · MWV, NH · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 666
Oldtradguy wrote: 
Anton at belay.


Me one an easy pitch following.


John

oldtradguy,

your story is excellent but TBH I don't believe that picture of Anton at the belay is on Sliding Board.

Anton appears to be standing too far left to be on Sliding Board. BF and I just looked it up and it appears he's at the top of Wedge (5.6-5.7) P2: https://www.mountainproject.com/photo/106302275

dragons
rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 526
Lori Milas wrote:

I love this, rgold!  What are hero loops?  

Yeah, the old farts at Supertopo would all know about these but elsewhere probably not.

Back in the Iron Age (pitons rather than nuts and cams), difficult direct aid often required placing pitons in very shallow cracks.  The piton (or nested group of pitons) stuck out a long way and clipping the eye usually created enough torque to twist a the piton in a vertical crack out of its placement or snap the shaft of a piton in a horizontal crack.  The solution was to tie off (via a girth hitch) the shaft of the piton flush with the wall, using a small loop of 1/2" webbing.  These loops were called hero loops in recognition of their users' willlingness to trust marginal placements.  The 1/2" webbing was very compact and it was typical to just stuff a bunch of hero loops in a pocket of one's climbing pants, where they often remained even if a big wall ascent was not in the offing.


Hero loops were also used in the eyes of pitons which, because of the placement, couldn't be clipped with a carabiner.  But that 1/2" webbing really wasn't up to much in the way of fall loading and the potential for the eye metal slicing the webbing was significant...
Guy Keesee · · Moorpark, CA · Joined Mar 2008 · Points: 311
rgold wrote: An account of one of my slab-leading misadventures.  http://www.supertopo.com/climbers-forum/1616302/An-afternoon-with-Kamps .

rgold..... pure gold! 

When I started climbing way back in the olden daze I fell in with Mark Powell, Bob Kamps, Herb Legar (sp?). Mark had an adventurous sprit and loved to explore the desert. Herb loves to do FA’s - still does. But Bob was the best person to climb with. He taught me so much about the sport and life. I’m sure you recall one of his favorite sayings, “the climb isn’t hard IF you use good footwork”.... DUH?!?!?! Whenever it is my turn to lead - I put these words into my head and focus on them.
Lori you are starting out on a path that many have followed- enjoy the journey! 
Oh yea the whole hand wrist thing: before I go climbing I warm up- a bunch! Jumping jacks or ??? Till you crack a sweat.... walking up hill for 30 min works. Start pulling slowly on EZ stuff and build up the intensity of your work. Then cool down on something easy.... then go ICE down your hands, wrists and arms. When I go to the ORG I like to lay down on one of those bridges and put both arms into the cold creek otherwise it’s digging into ice chest, the younger folks might disagree with this but they are kids and what do they know??? Last thing: tape fingers all the time is going to help, pulley wraps I think they are called and don’t practice crimping- save those for the climbs. 
Oldtradguy · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2008 · Points: 15

Dragons

Thanks for correcting me. We did this back in the late 80's or very early 90's.

My wife wants to go up to NH to do a couple of these slab climbs. Will try to get up there in late spring time frame.

John

dragons · · MWV, NH · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 666
Oldtradguy wrote: Dragons

Thanks for correcting me. We did this back in the late 80's or very early 90's.

My wife wants to go up to NH to do a couple of these slab climbs. Will try to get up there in late spring time frame.

John

Oldtradguy, PM me if you're in the area and hopefully we can get in a few climbs together! dragons

ErikaNW · · Golden, CO · Joined Sep 2010 · Points: 145
dragons wrote:

ErikaNW, if you're ever in the NH area, PM me, and we can do some multipitch slab climbs together.


That would be great! What’s the best season there?

Oldtradguy · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jun 2008 · Points: 15

Dragons

We will contact you. It will be nice to climb and meet with you.

John

SeƱor Arroz · · LA, CA · Joined Jan 2016 · Points: 10
Learning to climb at nearly 100!

Look, we're all pretty young here.
Dallas R · · Traveling the USA · Joined May 2013 · Points: 181
dragons wrote:

ErikaNW, if you're ever in the NH area, PM me, and we can do some multipitch slab climbs together.

Ditto to Lori. Dallas R, IIRC you said you're planning on NH this year. PM me when you're in the neighborhood and my bf and I will do some climbing together with you and your wife.

We have our Kayak guide gig April-May in Oregon, then we will go visit our son in Seattle, then start towards NH on US 2 around the first of June, it's about 3000 miles so we should be there by the middle of August or early September.  If we get bored in the UP we may get there sooner. By the time we get there we will really be looking for some climbing because I don't think there is much on our planned route.

rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 526
Dallas R wrote:

We have our Kayak guide gig April-May in Oregon, then we will go visit our son in Seattle, then start towards NH on US 2 around the first of June, it's about 3000 miles so we should be there by the middle of August or early September.  If we get bored in the UP we may get there sooner. By the time we get there we will really be looking for some climbing because I don't think there is much on our planned route.

I'm sure you have your reasons, but if you dropped down a little you could pass by Devil's Tower, the Needles in SD, and Devil's Lake Wi to name just a few classic areas.

rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 526
Oldtradguy wrote: Dragons

Thanks for correcting me. We did this back in the late 80's or very early 90's.

My wife wants to go up to NH to do a couple of these slab climbs. Will try to get up there in late spring time frame.

John

Stay up-to-date on the black fly season!

beensandbagged · · smallest state · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 10
Dallas R wrote:

We have our Kayak guide gig April-May in Oregon, then we will go visit our son in Seattle, then start towards NH on US 2 around the first of June, it's about 3000 miles so we should be there by the middle of August or early September.  If we get bored in the UP we may get there sooner. By the time we get there we will really be looking for some climbing because I don't think there is much on our planned route.

Along with R Golds warning about black fly season I would add that if you are riding route 2 you might consider adding The Adirondack Park to your list, https://apa.ny.gov/About_Park/index.html

(The  Rockyrondacks.) Besides being the largest Park in the lower 48 it has, in my humble opinion a flavor unique to the Northeast.    

Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 588
rgold wrote:

Yeah, the old farts at Supertopo would all know about these but elsewhere probably not.

Back in the Iron Age (pitons rather than nuts and cams), difficult direct aid often required placing pitons in very shallow cracks.  The piton (or nested group of pitons) stuck out a long way and clipping the eye usually created enough torque to twist a the piton in a vertical crack out of its placement or snap the shaft of a piton in a horizontal crack.  The solution was to tie off (via a girth hitch) the shaft of the piton flush with the wall, using a small loop of 1/2" webbing.  These loops were called hero loops in recognition of their users' willlingness to trust marginal placements.  The 1/2" webbing was very compact and it was typical to just stuff a bunch of hero loops in a pocket of one's climbing pants, where they often remained even if a big wall ascent was not in the offing.


Hero loops were also used in the eyes of pitons which, because of the placement, couldn't be clipped with a carabiner.  But that 1/2" webbing really wasn't up to much in the way of fall loading and the potential for the eye metal slicing the webbing was significant...

 What you don’t have on here is a keeper sling  if the piton comes out you lose the way it’s set up in the drawing 

rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 526
Jeffrey Constine wrote:

 What you don’t have on here is a keeper sling  if the piton comes out you lose the way it’s set up in the drawing 

Not my drawing---the best I could do, and in any case the point was to illustrate what hero loops did, not the ideal way to rig them.  Typically, we clipped a second carabiner to the eye and through one strand of the hero loop, although that wouldn't work if the loop broke,  This was enough most of the time; occasionally the piton would be too long and an additional sling had to be added.

We used tied-off pitons for free-climbing protection too, but then the hero loops were usually 9/16" webbing loops.  These same loops became the slings for Bridwell's original quick draws.
rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 526
beensandbagged wrote:

Along with R Golds warning about black fly season I would add that if you are riding route 2 you might consider adding The Adirondack Park to your list, https://apa.ny.gov/About_Park/index.html

(The  Rockyrondacks.) Besides being the largest Park in the lower 48 it has, in my humble opinion a flavor unique to the Northeast.    

The Dacks are fantastic and shouldn't be missed!

Fat Dad · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined Nov 2007 · Points: 60

Mr. Goldstone, what the illustration you've posted shows is a tie off or, more properly, a hero loop used as a tie off.  My understanding (old climber here who's done more than a few walls) is that a hero loop is a tie off tied through or clipped into a biner at the top of an aider to use when that top rung on the aider ain't getting the job done. So, same thing perhpas but just used differently?

BTW, can't believe it's taken me this long to chime in on this thread.

Jeffrey Constine · · Los Angeles, CA · Joined May 2009 · Points: 588
Fat Dad wrote: Mr. Goldstone, what the illustration you've posted shows is a tie off or, more properly, a hero loop used as a tie off.  My understanding (old climber here who's done more than a few walls) is that a hero loop is a tie off tied through or clipped into a biner at the top of an aider to use when that top rung on the aider ain't getting the job done. So, same thing perhpas but just used differently?

BTW, can't believe it's taken me this long to chime in on this thread.

 Yes hero loops are a part of an aider they are on the top of the ladder to grab or to stand in if you need to they are not a free sling to tie off pins. 

Dallas R · · Traveling the USA · Joined May 2013 · Points: 181
rgold wrote:

I'm sure you have your reasons, but if you dropped down a little you could pass by Devil's Tower, the Needles in SD, and Devil's Lake Wi to name just a few classic areas.


We weren't quite proficient enough when we went to Devils, tower, we may attempt that once we go back.  The needles, we spent a summer working at the non-profit book store at Mt. Rushmore, so got to do a lot of climbing off the needles highway, Custer State Park, and the Mt. Rushmore area in general.  Totally love Second Hand Rose.... Conn routes scare the crap out of us. We did learn to simul-rap, interesting study on counter weight descents, my 220 vs her 130... and the effects of rope drag.

We stopped by Devils Lake a couple of years ago, found it to be chossy, un-inspiring.  But a good place to keep practiced.

Adirondacks, we have hiked there but weren't climbing the last time we went through there.  Because we are now "climb oriented" we will search and research the area.  My sister lives in Rochester, NY so we will definitely be in the area.
dragons · · MWV, NH · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 666
ErikaNW wrote:

That would be great! What’s the best season there?

"It depends".

I think most people probably think that the cool months in fall are best. However, you might get a rainy fall (this happened last year), and you get washed out. Or it gets cold really early (snow before Halloween). If you check the Whitehorse Ledge page, you'll see a small peak in Sept-Oct.

I like climbing in the spring, provided it's warm and dry enough (> 45F) and provided the snow has melted, but you can run into seeping water on some routes. There's a black fly season in spring-summer which can put a cramp in your style. This is usually the month of June approximately (sometimes late May to mid-June). So far as I can tell, there's no bug spray which works against black flies. If you can't tolerate bug bites, you will want to avoid this season. Some years it's bad, others not so much.

Climbing in the summer is great, too. However, it can be super hot. Whitehorse gets full sun for a large part of the day, and it can be brutal until you wend your way up into the trees (and there really aren't many trees on most of the slab routes. "Beginner's Easy" and "Cormier-Magness" are exceptions).

I guess you could say it's a sufferfest most of the year, but the climbing is so awesome, I cannot complain   

Dallas R - I'd highly, highly recommend you guys stop by the Gunks (esp Trapps) on the way. Not to be missed! Especially if you are looking for an optimal place to settle down, you don't want to overlook this area. Maybe you've been there before but wow. OTOH you may never get to NH if you stop there. I see from your tick list that you've climbed Cathedral's Thin Air and Standard Route at Square Ledge. I've only followed Thin Air, but I have a goal to lead it this summer (knock on wood, if I stay injury-free). Have you guys done any other routes in NH? Once you get here, if you are interested, we can recommend a few, and hopefully climb a few together.
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Southern California
Post a Reply to " New and experienced climbers over 50 #4"

Log In to Reply