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Uses for old bits


Original Post
eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 523

I just tossed a worn drill bit and afterwards I was wondering if there were any ways to repurpose the old bits. Has anybody found uses for their old drill bits? And are they recyclable? I know reusing it for something else is better than recycling but I can't think of any uses off the top of my head. 

Abandoned User · · Unknown Hometown · Joined unknown · Points: 6,695

Coat rack. Couple of feet of 1x4 and some holes.

Allen Sanderson · · On the road to perdition · Joined Jul 2007 · Points: 1,188

I have had my bits resharpened, it costs slights less than a new bit. I figure reusing them a couple of times is worth keeping them out of the recycle bin and employee someone. 

Cabot Steward · · Smog Lake City · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 7
Allen Sanderson wrote: I have had my bits resharpened, it costs slights less than a new bit. I figure reusing them a couple of times is worth keeping them out of the recycle bin and employee someone. 

The bits that get used for bolting generally lose to much diameter before they need to be sharpened.  So the idea of sharpening bits is not very good for bolting, we struggle getting a wave bolt in quartzite with a brand new bit can't imagine a brand new one.  In quartzite sometimes we get two holes out of a bit and sometimes we get eight.

John Byrnes · · Fort Collins, CO · Joined Dec 2007 · Points: 612
eli poss wrote: I just tossed a worn drill bit and afterwards I was wondering if there were any ways to repurpose the old bits. Has anybody found uses for their old drill bits? And are they recyclable? I know reusing it for something else is better than recycling but I can't think of any uses off the top of my head. 

(Sigh, youngsters these days!)  Iron and steel of any type is recyclable.  After bronze, it was the first material to ever be recycled, and still the most profitable and beneficial to the planet.  Any "junkyard" will take them.  Of course, when they are melting down entire cars and trucks, they may laugh at you.

Andrew AJ Jackson · · Greensboro · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 1

You can saw the flutes off and thread the end to make a spinner tool for bolt replacement. It is not easy to cut threads onto the bits hardened steel but it can be done. Also, you can resharpen old 3/8 that have worn down in diameter to drill pilot holes that you expand to 1/2" saving wear on your new 1/2" bit.

David K · · New Paltz, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 145
John Byrnes wrote:

(Sigh, youngsters these days!)  Iron and steel of any type is recyclable.  After bronze, it was the first material to ever be recycled, and still the most profitable and beneficial to the planet.  Any "junkyard" will take them.  Of course, when they are melting down entire cars and trucks, they may laugh at you.

"Back in the iron age, we used to walk to school rain, sleet, or thunder-snow, uphill both ways."

Roy Suggett · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 7,855

IF they are the double cutting tipped bits and not the quad tipped, then it is easy to set them in a vise and sharpen with a file.  Follow the angle you see on the cutting edges and you will extend there life by about 10-20 holes, depending on rock.  After that the tips start to break down...I really like the coat/gear rack suggestion above!

John Byrnes · · Fort Collins, CO · Joined Dec 2007 · Points: 612
David Kerkeslager wrote:

"Back in the iron age, we used to walk to school rain, sleet, or thunder-snow, uphill both ways."

Yup, and in our nailed-boots.  

Mark Frumkin · · Bishop, CA · Joined Feb 2013 · Points: 11

You had boots?

Nate Doyle · · Sierra Foothills · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 39
Mark Frumkin wrote: You had boots?

And school.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Fixed Hardware: Bolts & Anchors
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