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Women's Specific Climbing Packs


Chris Blatchley · · Somerville, MA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 0

my girlfriend is ~5'5" and has started using my cilogear 30l worksack that was a little short for me and she says it's the most comfortable pack she's worn. the hipstrap is velcro so you can move it up or down a few inches as well. maybe worth asking if they would use your measurements. they are also supposedly developing a womens specific pack?

Malcolm Daly · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 380

I’ll second what Jaren Said. Deuter is making the best fitting women’s pack out there. I work at Neptune Mountaineering and by 4:1 we sell the Deuter over other brands. It’s also worth checking out the Hyperlite Mountain Gear. They make most of their packs in two or three different sizes and are well regarded by technical and weight-conscious users.Good luck.

Lena chita · · OH · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 1,030
Malcolm Daly wrote: I’ll second what Jaren Said. Deuter is making the best fitting women’s pack out there. I work at Neptune Mountaineering and by 4:1 we sell the Deuter over other brands. It’s also worth checking out the Hyperlite Mountain Gear. They make most of their packs in two or three different sizes and are well regarded by technical and weight-conscious users.Good luck.

Love my Deuter! And two of my friends (one male, one female) are totally rocking the Hyperlite.

I think I'm still having a hard time understanding what the OP wants.

I may be wrong, but I'm thinking of backpacking/carrying packs as the packs with internal frame, suspension, comfy padded belts, etc. Not the lightest packs, but optimized to carry long distance well. These often have lots of straps, loops, etc for attaching things externally, stowing a water bottle in side pockets, etc.

And when I'm thinking of climbing packs I'm thinking smaller size, no internal frame, so they would mold to your back more, and allow more freedom of movement in climbing, but they aren't super-comfortable to carry heavy weight in. And also not too many straps/things hanging on the outside, so they can be hauled in a pinch, either as-is, or with a hauling cover that some packs have. A lot of climbing packs don't even have a waist belt. Or if they do, it is light/flimsy, often unpadded, or attached with a velcro, or something like that.

And then there is a haul bag, where the emphasis is on durability and lack of things that snag on rocks, also not the most comfortable ones to carry while hiking long distance, and generally aren't meant to be worn while doing technical climbing at all, just meant to be hauled, while climbing.

I know people who do technical climbing in alpine environment who sometimes would carry two packs. A big "expedition" pack for carrying stuff up the mountain, basically hiking uphill. And a smaller pack that they strap on top of the big pack when they are carrying to base camp. And then for climbing they would put on the small pack.

But it seems that OP wants all of the above in one pack, I don't know if such thing exists in men's or women's pack at all... and  then it has to be labeled "women specific" and "climbing".



OP, you mentioned that you covet/admire some of your male partner's packs. Can you name specific models, so it would be easier to see what you are looking for?

Luc-514 · · Montreal, QC · Joined Nov 2006 · Points: 9,335

My friend loves her ClioGear 45L WorkSack with Women's hipbelt and crampon pouch option. They also have the 40B WorkSack which is a bit smaller and has the crampon pouch by default.
Takes a bit of time figuring out the strap system, but once you do you can load it up and keeps you nimble.

ClimbLikeAGirl · · Keene Valley · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 15
Luc-514 wrote: My friend loves her ClioGear 45L WorkSack with Women's hipbelt and crampon pouch option. They also have the 40B WorkSack which is a bit smaller and has the crampon pouch by default.
Takes a bit of time figuring out the strap system, but once you do you can load it up and keeps you nimble.

Luc, how are the shoulder straps for your friend?  Does she find that they cut into her neck at all? This seems like the best option I can find at this point! 

ClimbLikeAGirl · · Keene Valley · Joined Jun 2015 · Points: 15

I need a 45 to 50L pack.  It must fit a rack, rope, and essentials.

I'm NOT looking for a second's pack, a (30L) crag pack, expedition pack, or an alpine (winter conditions) pack.  

I'm looking for a big, streamlined bucket that will: hold all my rock gear & personal shit, sit on my body well, hold up for more than a year, has at least one gear loop on the waist belt. Sometimes I will take my pack for a 5 minute walk, sometimes I will take it for a 4 hour walk. Sometimes I will be scrambling around boulders on an approach, sometimes I will be thrashing through thick trees, and sometimes I will want to be roped up, all with my pack on.

Hopefully that clarifies a bit?

Malcolm Daly · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 380

ClimbLikeAGirl, you should reach out to the chicks at Chick With Picks down in Ouray. It’s a mob of the most fun-loving, badass guides on the planet and I’m sure they’d toss you some great advice.https://www.chickswithpicks.net. https://www.chickswithpicks.net/

Sloppy Second · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2018 · Points: 0
ClimbLikeAGirl wrote: 
I'm super sick of doing long days in the mountains with inferior and inadequate gear. Why do all my male partners have stuff that is built and designed for them but women have to make do with unintended equipment! >:(


If you are super sick of doing long days in the mountains maybe your pack is not the problem.

Jaren Watson · · Idaho · Joined May 2010 · Points: 2,395
Sloppy Second wrote:

If you are super sick of doing long days in the mountains maybe your pack is not the problem.

Nothing wrong with wanting the right equipment.

GDavis Davis · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2008 · Points: 10

I use a womens harness because I have a short rise and thick legs. People come in all shapes and sizes and gear manufacturers are trying to fit a "most" catagory - I recommend not getting caught up in the 'noted gender' of the product. Often women's specific gear is no different, only pink and more expensive. Try individual manufacturers, different models, all that stuff. It's just gear, what it looks like on the outside doesn't matter. One of my climbing partners is a woman who uses mens gear because she refuses to wear stuff that has weird flowery stitching or girly cuts, she just wants durable gear to climb in. If anything gear manufacturers could do better at marketing to women who just want to climb.

Sloppy Second · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2018 · Points: 0
Jaren Watson wrote:

Nothing wrong with wanting the right equipment.

Some people never find the right equipment.

Others always have it.

There are probably more models of women's specific climbing packs today than there were climbing packs of any sort 30 years ago.  How did anyone climb anything back then, with all that inferior and inadequate gear?
Ryan M Moore · · Philadelphia, PA · Joined Oct 2014 · Points: 35
ClimbLikeAGirl wrote: I need a 45 to 50L pack.  It must fit a rack, rope, and essentials.

I'm NOT looking for a second's pack, a (30L) crag pack, expedition pack, or an alpine (winter conditions) pack.  

I'm looking for a big, streamlined bucket that will: hold all my rock gear & personal shit, sit on my body well, hold up for more than a year, has at least one gear loop on the waist belt. Sometimes I will take my pack for a 5 minute walk, sometimes I will take it for a 4 hour walk. Sometimes I will be scrambling around boulders on an approach, sometimes I will be thrashing through thick trees, and sometimes I will want to be roped up, all with my pack on.

Hopefully that clarifies a bit?

I’m not sure what your personal gear is, but I can carry a rack, a rope, shoes, a jacket, some food, a helmet and have room left with my mutant 28.(I know it’s not gender specific , and wasn’t recommending it, rather using it as an example for size.) This is course means that the rope and helmets go on the outside in their appropriate strap attachments which you might not want(I prefer that way). Other than Alpine packs, I can’t think of many packs in the 45-50 L range that have gear loops, unisex or otherwise. Cold Cold World Ozone pack sounds almost like what you’re looking for, since you can customize you could ask for them to put a gear loop on it, and maybe the things that are necessary for it to be woman specific.(It’s also possible that they won’t be willing to customize it that much, the pack only comes in one size)

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