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Chamonix Anchor System?


Harumpfster Boondoggle · · Between yesterday and today. · Joined Apr 2018 · Points: 138
Jim Titt wrote:

That´s exactly what a Sirius was, a guide plate with a handle to allow lowering and a spring to hold it off.

The Skylotec slings are Dyneema-cored polyester so more robust than a straight Dyneema sling.

Thanks for that, Jim.


The Sirius seems complicated/expensive/bulky...how's about a DMM Pivot with Sticht-like springs and brake assist notches on the backside? Use a normal carabiner to create the handle for lowering the leader. Anodize the spring to make it sexy in a contrasting color.

I guess we are getting closer and closer to another Mega Jul, but rather than a thumb loop in front to prevent lock ups short-roping the leader a sticht-like spring would make handling better. Also that damn hole for putting a lever on the device needs to accommodate any 'biner.
rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 526
Harumpfster Boondoggle wrote:

Thanks for that, Jim.


The Sirius seems complicated/expensive/bulky...how's about a DMM Pivot with Sticht-like springs and brake assist notches on the backside? Use a normal carabiner to create the handle for lowering the leader. Anodize the spring to make it sexy in a contrasting color.

I guess we are getting closer and closer to another Mega Jul, but rather than a thumb loop in front to prevent lock ups short-roping the leader a sticht-like spring would make handling better. Also that damn hole for putting a lever on the device needs to accommodate any 'biner.

The Serius was, in fact, extremely simple.  It was a belay device based on the functioning of the carabiner brake system used for rappelling in days gone by.  You can't belay with a carabiner brake system, because it is s hard to pay out rope as it is to take it in.  The Serious replaced the braking carabiners with a spring-loaded cross bar; the springs held the bar towards the back and made it easy to pay out rope; climbing falls pulled the cross bar forward for braking.

Unfortunately, the Serius had wear problems that changed its braking characteristics.
Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490

The later Sirius was better as they added bushes to the cross bar and probably could have been completely resolved but then the body started wearing as well which didn´t help. I guess changing the body material and adding hard-metal bushes to the T-bar one could have got the lifespan acceptable but the manufacturers took the money and ran.
Any device used straight off the belay needs to be completely enclosed to stop something interfering with it´s braking action so a simple guide-plate idea is out realistically. Using a spring to hold the karabiner away from the body is anyway blocked by a patent. The Hewbolt would do what you want but would jam up the first time it touched the rock!
For Alpine climbing simple, light and effective is what´s wanted and that´s a Munter!

Brandon.S · · Palm Springs, Ca · Joined Feb 2011 · Points: 15
Jim Titt wrote:


Courtesy of the DAV. I use the left lower method. If you think using a quad/cordalette is simpler and faster then you are banana´s. Equalisation is of no interest in this scenario or in the video, redundancy is all we are looking for.

Thanks for the pic, I understand a little better.  I can see how that would be faster than using a quad/cordalette.  This, and as someone else mentioned, the figure 8 bunny ears are pretty slick setups when using the rope to build the anchor off bolts. 

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Fixed Hardware: Bolts & Anchors
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