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Jiujitsu


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Anthony McGlynn · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2018 · Points: 0

Mostly of the Brazilian variety but are there any other grapplers out there? Seems the only thing I have going for me when climbing is my grip and I feel like jiujitsu is mostly to blame.

Trad Princess · · Not That Into Climbing · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 1,175

I took it for a month.  Blew my knee out 

outofstep80 · · Manitowoc · Joined Sep 2008 · Points: 0

I’ve been doing bjj for just under 2 years. Good workout.

mike c · · golden · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 1,021

Offwidths!!

Benjamin Chapman · · Small Town, USA · Joined Jan 2007 · Points: 13,691

Perhaps you should try using your feet?

climberish · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 10

I more or less gave up jiujitsu when I started climbing 7 or 8 years ago... I slowly transitioned out of it due to injuries. Finger, shoulder, and elbow injuries are very prevalent in both sports. I couldn't give both sports the effort they require due to that. So I picked climbing. 

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275
Anthony McGlynn wrote: Mostly of the BrazilianI variety but are there any other grapplers out there? Seems the only thing I have going for me when climbing is my grip and I feel like jiujitsu is mostly to blame.

I don't think any sport would be bad for climbing (maybe weightlifting?). Grip is a good thing, Old guy grappler here. BJJ for twenty years.

Anthony McGlynn · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2018 · Points: 0

They seem very similar to me physically and like they would have a lot of the same injuries. But it seems like most people pick one or the other. Are any of you able to balance the two together?

grog m · · Saltlakecity · Joined Aug 2012 · Points: 70
Anthony McGlynn wrote: They seem very similar to me physically and like they would have a lot of the same injuries. But it seems like most people pick one or the other. Are any of you able to balance the two together?

Climbing isn't a casual sport. If you want to be serious about it, you don't casually do it. Sure some people are casual, but what they climb is pretty casual as a result. I casually lift, fish, and hike on the side because those can be casual sports.

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275
Anthony McGlynn wrote: They seem very similar to me physically and like they would have a lot of the same injuries. But it seems like most people pick one or the other. Are any of you able to balance the two together?

Anthony,

I climb and train in BJJ, as my above post indicates. Not sure what you mean by "balance the two together"? Many people participate in more than one sport.
climberish · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 10
FrankPS wrote:

I don't think any sport would be bad for climbing (maybe weightlifting?). Grip is a good thing, Old guy grappler here. BJJ for twenty years.

I don't see how lifting would be bad...

Sam Cieply · · Venice, CA · Joined Jun 2016 · Points: 30

BJJ was the first sport I ever pursued after two decades of being a sedentary nerd. I was frequently injured, and I also found that it was hard to make progress without going to class 3x/week. I'm not sure I could balance with my current climbing schedule. I also prefer getting outdoors to being in the gym, and would rather spend my hard earned money on gear and gas than monthly BJJ gym membership. If anyone has a recommendation for a gym in the LA area that does drop-ins and is beginner friendly (more of a chill pace porra), please let me know. I really enjoy it, but have been hesitant to roll since I started climbing.

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275
Sam Cieply wrote: BJJ was the first sport I ever pursued after two decades of being a sedentary nerd. I was frequently injured, and I also found that it was hard to make progress without going to class 3x/week. I'm not sure I could balance with my current climbing schedule. I also prefer getting outdoors to being in the gym, and would rather spend my hard earned money on gear and gas than monthly BJJ gym membership. If anyone has a recommendation for a gym in the LA area that does drop-ins and is beginner friendly (more of a chill pace porra), please let me know. I really enjoy it, but have been hesitant to roll since I started climbing.

Sam,

Many BJJ schools allow drop-ins at $20 per class. Call around and ask.
Stagg54 Taggart · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2006 · Points: 10
climberish wrote:

I don't see how lifting would be bad...

Strength to weight ratio...  It really depends on what you mean by lifting.  Are you trying to gain muscle mass? or simply work antagonistic muscles? or something else? There are a lot of variables.
R. Moran · · Moab , UT · Joined Mar 2009 · Points: 140

C'mon man. You can balance both! life is too short to pigeon hole yourself. Enjoy its many aspects. Climbing is amazing but it ain't everything. 

Izzy Nawfal · · Redondo Beach, CA · Joined Feb 2014 · Points: 505
Sam Cieply wrote: BJJ was the first sport I ever pursued after two decades of being a sedentary nerd. I was frequently injured, and I also found that it was hard to make progress without going to class 3x/week. I'm not sure I could balance with my current climbing schedule. I also prefer getting outdoors to being in the gym, and would rather spend my hard earned money on gear and gas than monthly BJJ gym membership. If anyone has a recommendation for a gym in the LA area that does drop-ins and is beginner friendly (more of a chill pace porra), please let me know. I really enjoy it, but have been hesitant to roll since I started climbing.

I've heard good things about Robot Jiujitsu in Sawtelle.  If you don't mind shifting to judo (my preference), you should try the Sawtelle judo dojo.  I practiced there for almost 8 years.  I've also heard good things about the Venice judo dojo.  PM me if you want more details, happy to help. 

Sam Cieply · · Venice, CA · Joined Jun 2016 · Points: 30
Izzy Nawfal wrote:

I've heard good things about Robot Jiujitsu in Sawtelle.  If you don't mind shifting to judo (my preference), you should try the Sawtelle judo dojo.  I practiced there for almost 8 years.  I've also heard good things about the Venice judo dojo.  PM me if you want more details, happy to help. 

Robot was where I started many years ago. Then I trained with John Machado, and later at Fabricio Werdum’s gym in Venice. Robot had the least impressive pedigree, but was the best gym in many ways. I will check back in with them and see if they now have options other than monthly. Venice and Sawtelle judo sound promising as well. Thanks for the tips!

climberish · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 10
Stagg54 Taggart wrote: Strength to weight ratio...  It really depends on what you mean by lifting.  Are you trying to gain muscle mass? or simply work antagonistic muscles? or something else? There are a lot of variables.

I understand that, but doubt FrankPS does. High intensity strength training (i.e. weight lifting) is super beneficial for climbing...

Anthony McGlynn · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2018 · Points: 0
FrankPS wrote:

Anthony,

I climb and train in BJJ, as my above post indicates. Not sure what you mean by "balance the two together"? Many people participate in more than one sport.

At a competitive level for jiujitsu whule keeping up with some tough climbs. Mostly I'm interested in how people hold up injury wise while doing both to an expert level. Im a brown belt in bjj looking to go to worlds and the pan ams and tons of pro matches. I eventually would love to do ADCC but I also really want to hit some big climbs. Do some really big rock but in order to do that I gotta hit a lot of small rock and get up to par for it. 

Shadrock · · Here and there. · Joined Jun 2009 · Points: 367

FWIW, I find MMA & Jits to be great for climbing training: and grip strength is actually the least of it. The ability/need to cycle through different kinds of strength in a given period of time makes it a good fit. Mark Twight incorporated some of the training methods in the early days of Gym Jones, and - more recently - Steve Bechtel talks about it a bit on the most recent Training Beta Podcast. 

Trad Princess · · Not That Into Climbing · Joined Jan 2012 · Points: 1,175

FWIW, if you're thinking about leaving climbing and trying jiujitsu, it's an easy transition as well.  I only trained for a month before my knee was injured, but the core strength and grip strength carry over.  Between those two things (and that I'm a fast learner,) they thought I had trained somewhere before.  

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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