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Do We really need all the “Cragging Classics?”


Lena chita · · OH · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 735
Cocoapuffs 1000 wrote: Lately,  these events seem to reduce traffic outside the immediate impacted crags, because so many people avoid them these days (I've noticed this at the Red River Rendezvous and Rocktoberfest).  Most people I know that go to them either are personally connected to the event or are new to climbing.  I hate to sound like a jerk but these events and fundraisers have absolutely zero appeal to me (and many others).  I can donate money or time without having wade through Patagonia merchandise and doing a dyno comp.

If you donate anyway, kudos to you! But the truth is, most people don’t, without some enticement/inducement.  If fundraiser events didn’t result in actual money raised, there would be no fundraising. And for some people the little enticement of stickers, dyno comp, and a chance to win a rope, is what makes a difference

Victor K · · Denver, CO · Joined Jul 2003 · Points: 165
ClimbingOn wrote:

Are you really suggesting that I pay to do volunteer trail work? Craggin' Classics require a weekend pass ($$$$). I do quite a bit of trail work in my area, and I have never paid to do so. I really don't think I'm going to start paying to volunteer, at a Craggin' Classic or elsewhere.

Actually, yes. Cragging Classics support regional climbing resources. Unless you climb exclusively at wilderness trad areas, you are entertaining yourself with resources provided by others, at no cost to you. Giving back is the right thing to do.

Dylan Pike · · Sandy, UT · Joined Sep 2013 · Points: 35
Victor K wrote:

Actually, yes. Cragging Classics support regional climbing resources. Unless you climb exclusively at wilderness trad areas, you are entertaining yourself with resources provided by others, at no cost to you. Giving back is the right thing to do.

Volunteer trail work and other volunteer activities are a way of giving back. Granted, there are extremely important rebolting efforts being undertaken by climbing coalitions all over the country, which require monetary donations. 

mediocre · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2013 · Points: 0
Victor K wrote:

Actually, yes. Cragging Classics support regional climbing resources. Unless you climb exclusively at wilderness trad areas, you are entertaining yourself with resources provided by others, at no cost to you. Giving back is the right thing to do.

I feel like there are other ways of giving back besides hosting hundreds of people in a typically delicate environment. Volunteer for trailwork, donate to the Access Fund, find a local route developer and donate bolts/time/money....not everything has to have shiny booths and guides running around teaching clinics. 

Cole T · · Cincinnati, OH · Joined May 2012 · Points: 306
mediocre wrote:

I feel like there are other ways of giving back besides hosting hundreds of people in a typically delicate environment. Volunteer for trailwork, donate to the Access Fund, find a local route developer and donate bolts/time/money....not everything has to have shiny booths and guides running around teaching clinics. 

True, but as I said above. Without the rocktoberfest festival the rrgc would be without almost 40% of their operating budget which covers supplies for trail work, maintenance, and the cost of land for us to climb on. There are other ways as you've said to give back if you don't want to go to the festivals, but they are an important part of keeping access open in some areas.

Cole T · · Cincinnati, OH · Joined May 2012 · Points: 306
http://rrgcc.org/about-us/corporate-records/

See page 6 of their 2017 report
Laralyn M. · · SF is home (but I live in NYC) · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 55
Tradiban wrote: Cragging Classics are for the large amount of "climbers" who would rather party than actually climb. Climbing seems to be more of a social identity now than an actual sport or recreation. A result of going mainstream.

I read an article over the weekend that basically suggested climbing is the new happy hour for millennials. Something about how—because of the amount of time they spend absorbed in their devices—they feel "a deep sense of loneliness" and "lacking community," which is something they get (community, not loneliness) at their local climbing gym. And that's why I go to my gym at 7am!

Tim Stich · · Colorado Springs, Colorado · Joined Jan 2001 · Points: 1,476
Laralyn M. wrote:

I read an article over the weekend that basically suggested climbing is the new happy hour for millennials. Something about how—because of the amount of time they spend absorbed in their devices—they feel "a deep sense of loneliness" and "lacking community," which is something they get (community, not loneliness) at their local climbing gym. And that's why I go to my gym at 7am! 

We have a great bar called the Ute and Yeti at our City Rock climbing gym. It's all the community you need.

What did the last Cragging Classic cost for you if you attended, ladies and gents?

Laralyn M. · · SF is home (but I live in NYC) · Joined Apr 2016 · Points: 55
Tim Stich wrote:

We have a great bar called the Ute and Yeti at our City Rock climbing gym. It's all the community you need.

I was in Amsterdam for a conference in June, and spent a bunch of time at De Klimmuur (local climbing gym), which has a bar and cafe. That was such an awesome touch—I took photos to show the managers at my climbing gym. 

bus driver · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Aug 2009 · Points: 1,065

Someone has to make salary and put sponsors in front of the masses.  

The reports suggest that they could go without Roctoberfest and revenue 120kish would still cover their expenses 90k ish. The difference is a mass gathering of people and about 40k extra in someone’s pocket. It is great if it’s going for more trails or to buy land etc. but it’s also easy to just pay bills and hire more help to put in the festival. It is a cash making festival that I’m sure is fun but not entirely necessary.  

I used to go to the Pocatello Pump. It’s an old school outdoor climbing comp but it doesn’t have the big names and clinics.  It was fun but it was also in a city park that’s meant to host mass gatherings.  

It’s a lot of people and these things tend to get bigger when organizers and sponsors are involved. one person full time is 40k. I’m not so sure that bolts wouldn’t get replaced without festivals. 

Population growth + climbing is fun and safe = 

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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