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Rainier


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Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0

BD guide gloves overkill for summit late July? Does anyone wear ski goggles over sun glasses or is there fogging issues with that method?  

Cory Brooks · · Fresno, CA · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 761

You won't need ski goggles in July or Guide gloves

Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0

I appreciate it. I havent been that high so I dont have anything to really compare to

Cory Brooks · · Fresno, CA · Joined Feb 2015 · Points: 761

caveat - if your hands run cold -- just check the summit forecast before you go if it looks cold bring the gloves. 

Jared Casper · · St. George, UT · Joined Feb 2006 · Points: 0

You won't need ski goggles, but I would definitely recommend some glacier glasses instead of just normal sunglasses.  The sun can get pretty intense coming off of the glacier.

pjc30943 · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 0

In contrast, I found that I was very happy to have goggles when we summited in July (another year, not this one). Winds were quite high and was sending ice through the air a bit like a sandblaster, which was painful to the eyes until we switched to goggles.

Kyle Tarry · · Portland, OR · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 175

I wore OR Arete gloves for the high bits on Liberty Ridge this year (Memorial Day weekend); Guides are probably overkill.  I wore uninsulated softshell gloves for everything below about 12k ft.

Nobody in my party wore goggles, and I didn't even bring any up.  I've never heard of wearing goggles over sunglasses...

Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0
Kyle Tarry wrote: I wore OR Arete gloves for the high bits on Liberty Ridge this year (Memorial Day weekend); Guides are probably overkill.  I wore uninsulated softshell gloves for everything below about 12k ft.

Nobody in my party wore goggles, and I didn't even bring any up.  I've never heard of wearing goggles over sunglasses...

Thanks for the info for sure. I wore sunglasses under goggles for hood. Neither were enough by themselves but together it was perfect until I worked up a intense sweat near near the pearly gates. Then the goggles fogged up but I was glad to have wind protection above my sunglasses. 

Kyle Tarry · · Portland, OR · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 175

Are you wearing proper glacier glasses (with side shields and minimal gap around your eyes)?  Good dark glacier glasses should be fine for any and all climbing in the Cascades.  Wearing goggles at all (let alone over glasses) sounds miserable.  I do not recall carrying goggles on any climb I have done in the Cascades.

Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0
Kyle Tarry wrote: Are you wearing proper glacier glasses (with side shields and minimal gap around your eyes)?  Good dark glacier glasses should be fine for any and all climbing in the Cascades.  Wearing goggles at all (let alone over glasses) sounds miserable.  I do not recall carrying goggles on any climb I have done in the Cascades.

Agreed. Always refining my kit. Will definitely not insist that my current setup is optimal. Pretty jenky in fact. Ill look at glacier goggles but I get law enforcement issue oakleys for free from a family member which have 4 interchangeable lens that are all ballistics rated not that that matters but it saves me $100+ so I wanna try n make it work.. Will invest if need be

Kyle Tarry · · Portland, OR · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 175

Eyes are pretty important so I recommend spending the $100 to protect them.  Maybe sell one of your totems?

What is the CAT rating or light transmission percentage for those super trooper glasses?  Glacier glasses are usually cat 4, and have 10% or less light transmission.

Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0
Kyle Tarry wrote: Eyes are pretty important so I recommend spending the $100 to protect them.  Maybe sell one of your totems?

What is the CAT rating or light transmission percentage for those super trooper glasses?  Glacier glasses are usually cat 4, and have 10% or less light transmission.

This is key info and why i use MP as a resoruce. I learn a lot through mentors and videos/reading research, but pointing me in the right direction with important info to look out for came a lot faster this method...ill report back on the oakleys and let U know those details.

Floyd "PC" Eggers · · Kennewick, WA · Joined Mar 2018 · Points: 351

Kyle Tarry is right stressing the eye pro. The Oakley's are great before elevation, but as you get higher you are exposed to more radiation and reflective light. Nothing sucks like eye fatigue or snow blindness when the weather is clear and your sitting on your ass waiting to recover. 

Kyle Tarry · · Portland, OR · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 175
Briggs Lazalde wrote:

This is key info and why i use MP as a resoruce. I learn a lot through mentors and videos/reading research, but pointing me in the right direction with important info to look out for came a lot faster this method...ill report back on the oakleys and let U know those details.

You can definitely look into it, but if you had to wear goggles over them on Hood I'd say you've already done the test that really matters.  You'll definitely want something even darker for longer days at higher altitude on Rainier!

Andy H · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 15

There were some really good deals a few months back on Julbo Explorer previous model because the 2.0 model came out.  Not sure if that's still the case, but may be worth checking out.

I had goggles with me when summiting Rainier but they were in the bottom of my bag.  I wore lightweight gloves the entire summit trek, but we had moderate conditions for June.  

chris magness · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 600

Invest in glacier glasses, they'll be an important part of your kit. Julbo has a bunch of good options like the Explorer (already mentioned!).

You don't need goggles up high on Rainier in summer months, it's never windy enough.  However, be sure to have a jacket with a bomber hood.  
To answer your question, though, I often have 3 or 4 pairs of gloves ranging from a work glove for low elevations, to something warm.  The moist, coastal air often makes the temps feel colder than they are.  You know how your body performs.. plan accordingly.
Late July is typically warm and dry, conditions peaking around the 22nd.

Briggs Lazalde · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2017 · Points: 0

Anyone have any glacier glasses for sale? Local pickup on the way from spokane

Jake Laba · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2012 · Points: 0

You can get caught in a storm any month of the year on that mountain. This past June I wore glacier glasses 99% of the time but a storm rolled in on the descent and the goggles were awesome.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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