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Extending quick draws


Original Post
Tiernan Kennedy · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0

Would this be a safe way to extend a quick draw to extend a piece in trad climbing? nullnull

Aleks Zebastian · · Boulder, CO · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 175

climbing friend,

yes, but you would just be buying some actual slings instead

Marc H · · Longmont, CO · Joined May 2007 · Points: 250

Yes. 

Chris Blatchley · · Somerville, MA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 0

should be fine for the occassional placement. you'll have a much better time with alpine draws. i'd ensure the rubber keepers stay facing toward the rope end of the dogbone. if you don't have the cash for alpine draws, go get 4 single length nylon slings for $20 and use those instead of the dog bones, then just carry the rest of your draws as regular length.

Tiernan Kennedy · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0

Thanks everyone!

I have a few alpine draws set up, but i used to climb exclusively sport so I had a lot of short draws and I’m looking for ways to convert them i to longer draws so I don’t need to buy new biners.

Vaughn · · Colorado · Joined Mar 2011 · Points: 50

Sometimes I'll do that when sport climbing and I encounter an unexpected bolt needing extension. For trad, do like others have suggested and get some alpine draws.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 487

It's safe, yes, but not as good as a sling of the equivalent length. The stiffness of the dogbones means that it will transmit any force in any direction from the rope pulling and so your piece more likely to get tugged around by rope movements.

A flexible sling will often protect your piece from being pulled by subtle rope movements, which means your nuts are less likely to get lifted out of their placement and your cams are less likely to walk. Even quickdraws that are more flexible will be better than a rigid sport climbing quickdraw when you use them on gear.

Chris Blatchley · · Somerville, MA · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 0
Tiernan Kennedy wrote: Thanks everyone!

I have a few alpine draws set up, but i used to climb exclusively sport so I had a lot of short draws and I’m looking for ways to convert them i to longer draws so I don’t need to buy new biners.

dogbones are dirt cheap, just ditch them or keep them around and swap em out when you go sport climbing, or just sport climb with alpine draws.

Sebastian Reichelt · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 0
Tiernan Kennedy wrote: Thanks everyone!

I have a few alpine draws set up, but i used to climb exclusively sport so I had a lot of short draws and I’m looking for ways to convert them i to longer draws so I don’t need to buy new biners.

Why would you need to buy new biners? Since it looks like your sport draws have wiregate biners, I can't see a problem with just using those. Unless you absolutely need the sport draws as well, I guess.

Squeak · · Perth West OZ · Joined Feb 2016 · Points: 21
Sebastian Reichelt wrote:

Why would you need to buy new biners? Since it looks like your sport draws have wiregate biners, I can't see a problem with just using those. Unless you absolutely need the sport draws as well, I guess.

even if you do needs sport draws aswell, it only takes seconds to swap out the dogbones for slings

Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 456
eli poss wrote: The stiffness of the dogbones means that it will transmit any force in any direction from the rope pulling and so your piece more likely to get tugged around by rope movements.

A flexible sling will often protect your piece from being pulled by subtle rope movements..
This - spring for the trad draw slings.
Tiernan Kennedy · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0
Squeak wrote:

even if you do needs sport draws aswell, it only takes seconds to swap out the dogbones for slings

Is there any way to remove the dog bones without ruining the rubber stopper part?

Drew Monaco · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 0

So do you predominantly use alpine draws on most trad placements?

Tiernan Kennedy · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 0
Drew Monaco wrote: So do you predominantly use alpine draws on most trad placements?

I’ll use sport draws for short extension sometimes, but for any meaningful extension I try to use alpine draws

Franck Vee · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2017 · Points: 70
Sebastian Reichelt wrote:

Why would you need to buy new biners? Since it looks like your sport draws have wiregate biners, I can't see a problem with just using those. Unless you absolutely need the sport draws as well, I guess.

Yeah - but then I'm in the same situation (climb mostly sport but some trad mixed in as well). In practice this way of doing it sucks because you end up switching biners all the time. It can become somewhat time-consuming if you're limited in the # of draws you have. Plus is quickly gets annoying... 


So unless you're into mega-projects trad-wise and needs tons of draws (or rarely switch between sport & trad I guess), I think it is very worthwhile buying the like dozen extra biners (and slings) to save the hassle....
Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 456

I have a 2:1 mix of 16 alpine / 8 quick. My alpine draws are Metolius Inferno biners on 60cm 11mm slings. My quickdraws are Petzl S Ang biners on Metolius 7" Quickdraw slings which are open and loose for half their length - I put the orange Angs on the closed end of the draw sling with Petzl String rubber fasteners and the grey Angs on the open end. As Eli said, you don't want to use stiff sport draws for trad.

eli poss · · Durango, Co · Joined May 2014 · Points: 487
Tiernan Kennedy wrote:

Is there any way to remove the dog bones without ruining the rubber stopper part?

Yes, although the ones with the rubber sewn in are prone to eventually breaking after repeatedly swapping it out a million times. But ultimately, it just a PITA to do that every time you want to go trad climbing. Eventually you'll find yourself wanting to just buy some more biners and some slings. Depending on how wandering the routes typically area at your area, you might not need that many alpine draws. 

To the OP: I often end up using more quickdraws than alpine draws on a lot of routes here, but my quickdraws are much more flexible than your BD draws. I'm usually bringing around 6-10x quickdraws, 3-7x alpine draws, 2x 30cm slings  and 1 double length sling, depending on how long and how wandering the route is. But, keep in mind, this is likely to vary substantially from area to area. Your gonna be using a different combination of draws and slings for indian creek or CA granite splitters than what you would bring for something in the gunks or a NC slab route. 

Drew Monaco · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 0

I didn't ask the right question I should jave asked when a placement doesnt need to be extended so you use a non extended alpine draw.  You answered it anyways.   That makes sense use the right length for the right placement but make sure the draw isn't stiff.  

Healyje · · PDX · Joined Jan 2006 · Points: 456

My mix of 2:1 is because when I have the slightest doubt of any kind about my rope path I extend my draws. That and our basalt routes, unlike say DevilsTower, do tend to wander a bit. Bottom line is you don't have to extend an alpine draw and can also use it short, but you can't extend a quickdraw to use it long.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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