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North Carolina Mountain Rescue boots


Original Post
Mac McMahan · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2018 · Points: 0

At the tail end of winter I purchased a pair of La Sportiva Trango Cubes. I like them because they are light and stiff enough to handle rugged terrain while carrying heavy loads and are not insulated, so that I can wear them on summer rescues in the sweltering heat of the southeast. However that might be a problem when next winter rolls around. We do not get brutally cold conditions here, but it does get cold enough that being out for several days in uninsulated boots would be uncomfortable. Would simply doubling up on the socks and using hand warmers work, or do any of you experts have a better idea to keep cold feet from making me another patient? (I cannot afford a pair of winter specific boots)

FosterK · · Edmonton, AB · Joined Nov 2012 · Points: 43

I would be hard pressed to believe that if your boots fit appropriately for summer wear that you'd have enough room for a second set of socks and hand warmers. Additional socks and hand warmers are likely to cut off circulation, and the hand warmers will likely be starved of oxygen in such a tight boot.

A better solution is probably electric heated socks or insoles.

Mac McMahan · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2018 · Points: 0

Thanks, I’ll definitely look into that. I can fit 2 pair of socks by removing the padded tongue, but haven’t tried it with hand warmers yet.

How are the electric socks powered?  Do they have built in batteries or an umbilical to batteries in your pocket?

webdog · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 0
  1. It sounds like you got one boot that will accomplish nothing well. They’re sized too large for summer use. As a winter boot it’s only 3/4 shank and un-insulated. Anything vertical will get old quick 
Skibo · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 5

Use vapor barrier liners (improve warmth, keep the boot from getting wet from inside) and insulated supergaiters.  Or buy some plastic double boots for really cheap, but they suck for long hikes.

Mac McMahan · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2018 · Points: 0

They actually fit quite well in the summer, I can lace them down incredibly snugly on a single pair of socks. I will admit that they will not climb vertical ice well, but that is not what I purchased them for. Most of what I use them for is steep, offtrail rhodo-neering, in conditions from summer thunderstorms and sweltering heat to moderate snow and ice. I figured this would be a good all around boot (I know that all around boots don’t really do anything well), plus it was on sale and I’m a broke college student. 

climbing coastie · · Wasilla, AK · Joined Feb 2011 · Points: 90

I’d guess super gaiters would be the answer. Get to keep the same sock combo as summer. Add a little warmth. Also shouldn’t be that expensive.

Unfortunately I’m not sure who makes them anymore besides 40 below and theirs need to be glued to your boot. 

Mac McMahan · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2018 · Points: 0

I’ll look into that, thanks. 

Skibo · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2016 · Points: 5
https://www.mtntools.com/cat/techwear/03gaiters.html

I have a pair, unused, if you're interested.  Need to check the size.
Gunkiemike · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2009 · Points: 2,795
climbing coastie wrote: I’d guess super gaiters would be the answer. Get to keep the same sock combo as summer. Add a little warmth. Also shouldn’t be that expensive.

Unfortunately I’m not sure who makes them anymore besides 40 below and theirs need to be glued to your boot. 

+1 for insulated supergaiters.  Also get some insoles AKA footbeds that are designed for warmth.

Jason4Too · · Bellingham, Washington · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 0

I've climbed in the Cascades in winter in my Scarpa Charmoz boots which should be comparable for insulation to the Trango Cubes and I've been even in single digits as long as I keep the boots dry and keep moving.  I've also spent a day belaying at the bottom of a frozen waterfall and got really cold feet in my Nepals until I retied them considerably looser.  Even normal gaiters will help keep your feet dry in sloppy snow and add an extra layer to keep you warm.  A little care will go a long ways too, make sure you have something to stand on if you aren't moving in the winter and do not stand around in crampons if you don't need them for traction.  The metal will conduct precious heat out of your boots and straight into the snow.  

In short, keep your boots dry, don't cut off circulation, take off your crampons, and stand on a square of foam and you'll be ok until you finish school and can buy another pair of boots for winter.

Linnaeus · · NZ · Joined Aug 2011 · Points: 0

By the time you buy supergaiters, fancy insulated insoles, electric heaters, etc etc, you're probably not far off from a used set of boots from the forum here or eBay, especially if you have a common foot size and shape. Good-great condition LS Nepals can be had for $150-200, or less sometimes (on eBay especially). And some of the older models like Scarpa Cumbre, LS Nepal Extremes, Karakoram, can be even cheaper (seen plenty sell for $50-75). Hiking in older double boots isn't fun but they are warm, versatile, cheap, and last a long time. Heck even nice Spantiks often sell for $150 range. 

Mac McMahan · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jan 2018 · Points: 0

Thank you all for your advice, I’ll definitely look into your suggestions. I think I will try some nice thick socks with new gaiters that actually fit and are waterproof. Once winter rolls around and I get a chance to test them I will update on how it worked. Thanks again.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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