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What is your favorite Non-Climbing book?


David K · · New Paltz, NY · Joined Jan 2017 · Points: 144
1984 and the book I consider its spiritual successor, Embassytown. These books have deeply affected how I view language and its relation to power.

Neuromancer and to a lesser extent the two books which complete the trilogy helped me cultivate a proper level of paranoia about technology when I was young.

The Shobo Genzo had a pretty large effect on my philosophy. Although ultimately I disagree with some of its fundamental ideas my life practice attempts to emulate Dogen's in many ways.

Albers' Interaction of Color has really increased my appreciation for painting and graphic design (when it's done well).

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs really made me the programmer I am today. I learn something new every time I open this book and I've read it a few times.

Mindset: The New Psychology of Success had a pretty big impact on me, although to be honest it's a whole book for a fairly simple (albeit powerful) idea, so if you read the first chapter you've got the whole thing really.

Evolution for Everyone is a pretty thorough look at evolution which was easy to understand.

The God Delusion was pretty helpful for putting words and structure to what I was already thinking when I read it. I'm not sure it would be my first recommendation on the topic, though.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Life is too important to take seriously.

Starting Strength has really affected how I approach all aspects of training.

Of these, I think probably most of them have affected my climbing in some way. How I talk about climbing is affected by 1984  and Embassytown, my relationship with technology (partially based on Neuromancer) pushed me toward outdoor sports that get me away from the digital, philosophy from Shobo Genzo, and The God Delusion have to do with why I climb, Shobo Genzo, The Hitchhiker's Guide and Mindset  both affect how I deal with failure and difficulty when climbing. Starting Strength affects how I train.
Walter Edly · · Thomasville NC · Joined Apr 2013 · Points: 10

Rich dad, poor dad.  Gotta make coin for everything else to be possible...

Mark Dalen · · Albuquerque, NM · Joined Dec 2011 · Points: 950

Being & Nothingness - it's all pretty much in there ...

Mike wand · · San Marcos · Joined Dec 2011 · Points: 25

Any book written by Thomas Sowell. 

yosem1te · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Nov 2015 · Points: 25

Dharma Bums and On the Road, both by Jack Kerouac.  Both helped inspire me to get out and climb more, and live the dirtbag life.

FrankPS · · Atascadero, CA · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 275

Lone Survivor, but it has no climbing related value to me.

Jeremy Bauman · · Lakewood, CO · Joined Feb 2009 · Points: 845

As a Christian, I'd honestly have to say the Bible. Without getting into how it's shaped and changed my life and drawn me to climbing -- I really like bringing a small Bible with me because they're super compact and I can always flip it open to something that matches whatever mood I'm in / time I have to read.

Reading through a few proverbs while waiting for partners to show up ect. has been a great way to keep myself from getting upset when they're 15 min late!

"He makes my feet like the feet of a deer; he causes me to stand on the heights." Ps 18:33

Dead Head · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2017 · Points: 65

Do androids dream of electric sheep?

Abandoned User · · Unknown Hometown · Joined unknown · Points: 6,680
Andy McQuillen wrote:

Don't forget Desert Solitaire, Abbey's Road, Beyond the Wall, and a Voice Crying in the Desert.

Abbey's finest work was Black Sun. Longing, sorrow, heart wrenching beauty.

Fleetwood Matt · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2006 · Points: 610
Old lady H wrote: Geez, I forgot to throw in "South" by Shackleton. Great adventure, but, he got all of his team home. If that doesn't speak to climbing, nothing does.

Best, OLH

Yep, that's the one.  The greatest adventure that will ever be.

Buddy Smith · · GA · Joined May 2017 · Points: 40
Kevin MP wrote: Edward Abbey:
Monkey Wrench Gang
Hayduke Lives!
The Fool's Progress

Abbey is very relevant to the outdoor adventurer for his love of the desert Southwest and wilderness everywhere, radical environmentalist views, disdain for American consumerism, fantastic characters and great humor.

Just re-read all of those last month and they are amazing, but you left out Desert Solitaire!

ROCKMAN2 · · Nederland, CO · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 85
Buddy Smith wrote:

Just re-read all of those last month and they are amazing, but you left out Desert Solitaire!

Yes. Desert Solitaire is essential for anyone that finds the sandstone playground of Utah to be sacred. 

ROCKMAN2 · · Nederland, CO · Joined Jul 2010 · Points: 85
Jeremy Bauman wrote: As a Christian, I'd honestly have to say the Bible. Without getting into how it's shaped and changed my life and drawn me to climbing -- I really like bringing a small Bible with me because they're super compact and I can always flip it open to something that matches whatever mood I'm in / time I have to read.

Reading through a few proverbs while waiting for partners to show up ect. has been a great way to keep myself from getting upset when they're 15 min late!

"He makes my feet like the feet of a deer; he causes me to stand on the heights." Ps 18:33

Have you read the ENTIRE Bible? Dig into that old testament. Lots of creepy incest, barbarism, anthropomorphic sky-gods, tribalism, dubious laws, and eternal mountains of fodder that will surely challenge your faith. Hard to imagine an omnipotent omniscient benevolent God had anything to do with it. I'd expect a much better book from a deity that supposedly creates universes. Read objectively, the Bible sounds more like North Korean propaganda than non-fiction. Humans read and write books- I don't see how a God could have any use for such a banal object, especially one rife with plagiarism and contradiction. Organized religions are all cults of self-imposed ignorance.

Check out: Letter to a Christian Nation by Sam Harris. It may help clear things up for you.

Eric L · · Roseville, CA · Joined Jan 2015 · Points: 115
NWNINJA wrote:

Have you read the ENTIRE Bible? Dig into that old testament. Lots of creepy incest, barbarism, anthropomorphic sky-gods, tribalism, dubious laws, and eternal mountains of fodder that will surely challenge your faith. Hard to imagine an omnipotent omniscient benevolent God had anything to do with it. I'd expect a much better book from a deity that supposedly creates universes. Read objectively, the Bible sounds more like North Korean propaganda than non-fiction. Humans read and write books- I don't see how a God could have any use for such a banal object, especially one rife with plagiarism and contradiction. Organized religions are all cults of self-imposed ignorance.

Check out: Letter to a Christian Nation by Sam Harris. It may help clear things up for you.

Dude, let it go.  No need to turn sharing what is important to each of us as individuals into an attack.  You are centered where you are.  So is he.  Let it be.

Buck Rio · · MN · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 1

The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture by Wendell Berry  Since its publication by Sierra Club Books in 1977, The Unsettling of America has been recognized as a classic of American letters. In it, Wendell Berry argues that good farming is a cultural development and spiritual discipline.

I'll also second any book by Dan Simmons (Abominable, The Terror, Song of Kali)

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

General Climbing
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