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Sterling power cord


Original Post
true psychonaut · · the abyss (kansas) · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 195

How come you never see it on peoples harnesses? So light, so strong,  a 20' barely takes up any room on your harness. I have had people come up and kind of freak out because its so thin, I guess they think it could cut to easily on a sharp edge? I've tried cutting it before and its really hard to do. Can anybody come up with a reason why you would use anything else?

BigFeet · · Texas · Joined May 2014 · Points: 385
universal dude wrote: How come you never see it on peoples harnesses? So light, so strong,  a 20' barely takes up any room on your harness. I have had people come up and kind of freak out because its so thin, I guess they think it could cut to easily on a sharp edge? Can anybody come up with a reason why you would use anything else?

Can you get the job done without it?

It didn't get shipped with the rest of your new gear from Backcountry?

You don't want to be "that guy", do you?

It got used to resling my Dragons?

Etcetera?

Each to their own. Just be safe and understand the abilities of the gear you are using.
true psychonaut · · the abyss (kansas) · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 195

Just was trying to get the word out about how great this stuff is. Its been on the market for years, but you still see people with all this thick cordage or whats even worse is webbing. Also was looking to get some real feedback on why you wouldn't use. Hence the reason I posted under climbing gear discussion.

amarius · · Nowhere, OK · Joined Feb 2012 · Points: 20

Quick search on Moosejaw shows the following:
6mm x 6.4m Sterling Powercord cordellete  is 29.96, 4.68 USD per meter.
7mm x 50mSterling Accessory cord is 79.95,  1.60 USD per meter.

Unless one is climbing on the bleeding edge, weight and bulk savings might not be the best deal.

true psychonaut · · the abyss (kansas) · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 195

Money isn't a issue when it comes to climbing gear for me personally. I just had to rack up with somebody elses cordelette the other day and was wishing I had my power cord.

BigFeet · · Texas · Joined May 2014 · Points: 385

I was trying to be a bit humorous, but my points are valid.

I bought some years ago because my mentor, at the time, showed me anchor building with a cordelette. I thought small, but strong, leading to the purchase of said super cord.

There is something about a burly cord that gives confidence where the thin stuff sets off the lizard brains' alarm bells.

I reslung my Dragon cams with it, so it is useful for more than one application. I've also made a "long draw" with dedicated lockers for certain climbs.

true psychonaut · · the abyss (kansas) · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 195
BigFeet wrote: I was trying to be a bit humorous, but my points are valid.

I bought some years ago because my mentor, at the time, showed me anchor building with a cordelette. I though small, but strong, leading to the purchase of said super cord.

There is something about a burly cord that gives confidence where the thin stuff sets off the lizard brains' alarm bells.

I reslung my Dragon cams with it, so it is useful for more than one application. I've also made a "long draw" with dedicated lockers for certain climbs.

I don't pick up on humor to well sometimes   and I do get your point. Did you use a tripple fisherman on the cams you reslung and how well does all that bulk do on the finger size peices? I could see it getting jammed into a crack when falling.

BigFeet · · Texas · Joined May 2014 · Points: 385
universal dude wrote:

I don't pick up on humor to well sometimes   

No worries. Sometimes I don't pick up on the fact that I'm being an ass.

I've replaced (hands) three Dragon slings, and yes the bulky knot sucks to some extent, but there is no waiting for shipping or otherwise. I've never had a problem with the knot being stuck in a crack - more so on pulling the correct end when extending while at a precarious stance, but I have that problem with the O.E.M. sling too.
Clifford Meece · · Chicago, IL · Joined Jul 2015 · Points: 146

I have it and love it to death. Almost every other amga guide I see carries it...it spread like wildfire through the guiding community. The only item that seemed to spread as fast is the hollowblock. 

Jonathan Awerbuch · · Boulder, Colorado · Joined Nov 2013 · Points: 36

I use a Mammut Contact sewn runner, 8mm x 240 cm.

true psychonaut · · the abyss (kansas) · Joined Aug 2013 · Points: 195

I had to rap off of a couple cordelletes tied together one time when our ropes got stuck. It worked but thats a awful thin cord running through a atc.

doligo · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2008 · Points: 269

Maybe because it's not supple enough to use as prusiks. Generally, people who are concerned about weight/bulk like bringing stuff that is more versatile.

cyclestupor · · Woodland Park, Colorado · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 91

I don't have any of Power Cord, but I know lots of people use it and other high strength 6mm cord frequently.  I think it is perfectly safe, but there are some things to be aware of...
caves.org did some testing of various cord types and published some interesting findings.  They didn't test Sterling Power Core, but they did test BD Gemini which is also a Technora core...   http://caves.org/section/vertical/nh/49/cthsc/cthsc.html

Their complaints about the Gemini (according to their testing) were...
1) Only 40% of full strength when tied in a figure 8.  (nylon was 92% in their testing).  However, strength of double/triple fishermans was higher.
2) Fatigues when repeatedly tied and untied (looked like about 50% at worst).
3) Stiff and hard to tie/untie.

For those reasons, you will probably want to replace your Power Cord more frequently than a nylon cord.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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