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Carabiner wore out after one day of top rope?


Brent D · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Oct 2016 · Points: 197
Anthony Haamen wrote:

Lol I’m just as surprised as you 

The irony. 

Julian H · · Unknown Hometown · Joined May 2017 · Points: 0

i think the official answer is retire if 10% is gone or sharp edges. A worn carabiner will cut the rope before breaking.
https://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en_US/qc-lab-dangers-of-rope-worn-carabiners.html

JRZane · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Dec 2015 · Points: 90

Petzl biners come new with a little tiny groove in the basket to help keep the rope in place.  I had a new set of Spirit draws that I hadn't used much their first season but I noticed the groove.  I was shocked I had put so much wear into them in only a handful of days out.  when I got home I compared them to the brand new ones that I didn't bring along and they had a tiny little bevel in them too.  When the anodization wears off, it can seem like that much wear came from erosion, but its not.  you just lost the color and thats it.

Billcoe · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 833


I have resisted posting in this thread until now.
Ben Johnson · · Mill Valley, CA · Joined May 2018 · Points: 0

If you want to put less wear on your top rope carabiners, put a non locker smaller than your locking carabiners in between your locking biners. Most of the wear will go onto the cheaper non locker, but you will have the security of locking carabiners. For use with the attache I would recommend the Petzl Ange S. This technique is endorsed and taught by the American Mountain Guide Association.

Locker · · Yucca Valley, CA · Joined Oct 2002 · Points: 2,269

"Carabiner wore out after one day of top rope?"

FTR = no it didn't

adeadhead · · Baltimore, MD · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 92
Locker wrote: "Carabiner wore out after one day of top rope?"

FTR = no it didn't

Christ, no one in the thread has said it did, can we please leave the necro'ing of threads to jesus 'round these parts.

Jaren Watson · · Idaho · Joined May 2010 · Points: 2,409
adeadhead wrote:

Christ, no one in the thread has said it did, can we please leave the necro'ing of threads to jesus 'round these parts.

I suppose it could be argued the OP said something like that.

Locker · · Yucca Valley, CA · Joined Oct 2002 · Points: 2,269

"Christ, no one in the thread has said it did, can we please leave the necro'ing of threads to jesus 'round these parts."

Do you know anything about micro fractures?

rgold · · Poughkeepsie, NY · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 526
John Wilder wrote: Imho, you shouldn't use I-beam carabiners for top roping or for primary rappelling carabiners. They wear down super fast. Round stock is better.

This does look like mostly anodization wear, but i wouldn't be surprised to see wear on the sides on that carabiner already.

And it isn't just that they wear down; the I-beam cross-section can result in sharp edges, which are very dangerous.  Carabiners like that are made to be light, not robust, and extensive top-roping isn't really what they're intended for, although rappelling also tends to wear them in the same way.

In addition to all-steel carabiners, there are also the lighter Edelrid "bullet proof" models with steel insert in the wear region.  Eg https://www.edelrid.de/en/sports/locking-carabiners/hms-bulletproof-screw.html
Marcelo · · santa cruz, ca · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 10
Healyje wrote:
Edelrid HMS Bulletproof Screw Carabiner

Picked up one of these to test out as my Rap binner and loved it. Picking up a few more to make my dedicated TR binners.  On a side note rapping with steel beaners creates a heck of a zap from the static electricity.

rockklimber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 0
Marcelo wrote:

Picked up one of these to test out as my Rap binner and loved it. Picking up a few more to make my dedicated TR binners.  On a side note rapping with steel beaners creates a heck of a zap from the static electricity.

Interesting.  Doesnt seem like there would be any difference.  Steel and aluminum are both highly conductive

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490

Anodised  aluminium is non-conductive.

bttrrtRock Charles · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2014 · Points: 5
Jim Titt wrote: Anodised  aluminium is non-conductive.

what if that anodized coating wears away...

Colonel Mustard · · Sacramento, CA · Joined Sep 2005 · Points: 1,186
bttrrtRock Charles wrote:

what if that anodized coating wears away...

Wow, that's a great closing of the circle for this thread. It really should end with the snake eating its own tail.

rockklimber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 0
Jim Titt wrote: Anodised  aluminium is non-conductive.

I actually wasnt thinking of anodized aluminum (I started climbing before they started anodizing most carabiners and non-anodized aluminum is about twice as conductive as steel).  But it doesn't last very long on the rope bearing surfaces for climbers who climb frequently or after a couple of rappels in Red Rocks.  

Jim Titt · · Germany · Joined Nov 2009 · Points: 490
rockklimber wrote:

I actually wasnt thinking of anodized aluminum (I started climbing before they started anodizing most carabiners and non-anodized aluminum is about twice as conductive as steel).  But it doesn't last very long on the rope bearing surfaces for climbers who climb frequently or after a couple of rappels in Red Rocks.  

I was more thinking about the anodising under the stainless part insulating it from the rest of the world! Or that the part you touch is still anodised so you don´t get a shock.

I come from the generation with steel karabiners (and steel fig 8 descender) and have obviously been through all the various changes and can´t say I´ve ever noticed anything related to static electricity happening. A brief look at the triboelectric series tells us that both nylon and aluminium are positive and steel is considered neutral so any effect should be small but the tables aren´t very precise and don´t include stainless anyway. However in the Journal of Cosmetic Chemists you can find tests of human hair against aluminium, steel and stainless steel, unfortunately the order of which has the highest potential (most charged) changes depending on which way the metal is rubbed along the hair (root to tip or vice versa) so it´s anyone´s guess  

Marcelo · · santa cruz, ca · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 10
rockklimber wrote:

Interesting.  Doesnt seem like there would be any difference.  Steel and aluminum are both highly conductive

I have a full metal autolocker i use when rope lead soloing and it zaps me on every rap. On a side note I have a titanium femur rod and titanium screws /plates througout my legs. Not sure if that's why or not?!

rockklimber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 0

I’ve been zapped by my aluminum biners (anodized) but it doesnt happen all the time.  I’ll have to start paying more attention to when it happens.  I suspect its usually in dry climates.

F loyd · · Kennewick, WA · Joined Mar 2018 · Points: 361
rockklimber wrote: I’ve been zapped by my aluminum biners (anodized) but it doesnt happen all the time.  I’ll have to start paying more attention to when it happens.  I susoect its usually in dry climates.  

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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