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Is it safe to spray Dyneema fabric with Petroleum Distillates (UV protection)?


Original Post
Ari D. · · Moab, UT · Joined Jun 2017 · Points: 0

Wanting to spray a Dyneema MLD Burn with Scotcguard that uses petroleum distillates... 

The other option is using Trek7 Raybloc which is water based.

Is it safe to spray Dyneema fabric with Petroleum Distillates (as UV protection)?

Thanks,

Ari

Spencer Ringwood · · Somerville, MA · Joined Aug 2016 · Points: 0

You can call and ask the manufacturer, they should have a list of chemicals that will react with their products but I can't imagine they'd recommend applying anything to protective equipment. for sure though YGD

r m · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Apr 2015 · Points: 0

When you say "dyneema" do you mean "dyneema x" or cuben fibre, or some  woven dyneema fabric?

Chances are there's far more to consider than just dyneema.

Brandon.Phillips · · Portola, CA · Joined May 2011 · Points: 55

Why?

Lee Green · · Edmonton, Alberta · Joined Nov 2011 · Points: 50
Ari D. wrote:

Wanting to spray a Dyneema MLD Burn with Scotcguard that uses petroleum distillates... 

The other option is using Trek7 Raybloc which is water based.

Is it safe to spray Dyneema fabric with Petroleum Distillates (as UV protection)?

Thanks,

Ari


rockklimber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 0
Brandon.Phillips wrote:

Why?

Yeah, why?  Dyneema is already more UV resistant than nylon and the dyneema will wear out from use sooner than from UV degradation.  After 18yrs of 35+ weekends a year of multipitch I have yet to retire a piece of soft gear from UV degradation.  

Lee Green · · Edmonton, Alberta · Joined Nov 2011 · Points: 50

1) If you ask the manufacturer the answer will be "no." That's because you'll get their attorneys' answer, not their engineers'. The liability lawyers' answer is always no. They don't even need to know your question; their answer is no.

2) If you want a real answer, ask a materials science engineer. Be prepared for an answer that depends on specific situations. If you're looking for one size fits all, buy tube socks.

3) Most Dyneema fibers destined for outdoor use have been manufactured with UV protectants already incorporated. Check to see if yours has. Spraying on additional may be redundant, so you may not need to worry at all!

rockklimber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 0
Lee Green wrote:

3) Most Dyneema fibers destined for outdoor use have been manufactured with UV protectants already incorporated. Check to see if yours has. Spraying on additional may be redundant, so you may not need to worry at all!

Where did you read dyneema has UV protectants incorporated?  It's inherent in the UHMWPolyethylene

Lee Green · · Edmonton, Alberta · Joined Nov 2011 · Points: 50
rockklimber wrote:

Where did you read dyneema has UV protectants incorporated?  It's inherent in the UHMWPolyethylene

I may have misread; I don't know that it's added as opposed to inherent in the properties of the base material, just that commercially available Dyneema slings are resistant to UV degradation. Either way, spray-on seems redundant.

rockklimber · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Feb 2008 · Points: 0
Lee Green wrote:

I may have misread; I don't know that it's added as opposed to inherent in the properties of the base material, just that commercially available Dyneema slings are resistant to UV degradation. Either way, spray-on seems redundant.

Correct.  It's inherent in the base material polyethylene.  Yes it does seem redundant (and unnecessary).

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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