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Favorite Trad Pack / Crag Pack?

Shaniac · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 14

Osprey Mutant. Comes in multiple sizes, my 37L hauls weight really well. External rope carry if you need extra room. Past generations are $50 on ebay. Hauls tools and skis well. And my 37 is 2 pounds lighter than my BD Mission 50. I have been using mine for over a year now and I am sold. Certainly worth looking into. Good luck! Packs are a tough one to find a perfect fit.
https://vimeo.com/279733718

Suburban Roadside · · Abovetraffic on Hudson · Joined Apr 2014 · Points: 2,284
Shaniac wrote: Osprey Mutant. Comes in multiple sizes, my 37L hauls weight really well. External rope carry if you need extra room. Past generations are $50 on ebay. Hauls tools and skis well. And my 37 is 2 pounds lighter than my BD Mission 50. I have been using mine for over a year now and I am sold. Certainly worth looking into. Good luck! Packs are a tough one to find a perfect fit.
https://vimeo.com/279733718


Yes. a sturdy option worthy of most missions, and there is this "way-optimisticly-priced" one FS here, someone might try to offer the going price?

chris p · · Meriden, CT · Joined Oct 2018 · Points: 192

I've been using rei's trail pack 40. I can carry a double rack and rope comfortably for a mile or two hike in and it seems pretty durable so far. 

Andrew Krajnik · · Plainfield, IL · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 1,703
Christian Sperry wrote: The Mountain Hardwear Crag Wagon is bombproof and super functional. I use mine 4-5 times a week and loved it so far! Its bombproof, and I personally like the design more than the BD pack. The 60 liter fits my double rack, draws, rope and everything else you'll need quite well. It even comes with guidebook specific pockets. It has a duffel bag opening, which makes it super convenient to move back and forth without repacking the entire bag. It comes with haul loops If you really have to use it as a haul bag, and is super burly. If you're in the market for a new crag pack, I cant recommend it enouph. 

Interesting... hadn't heard of that one. Is it hydration compatible?

Sam X · · Bend, OR · Joined Oct 2017 · Points: 30

Metolius sentinel would be a good choice, and more versatile than say a creek 50. Or the metolius freerider.

Ethan Henderson · · Redmond, WA · Joined Oct 2010 · Points: 645

Not specific to your packs, but I've had my metolius quarter dome haul bag, which I use as a crag pack, for almost 10 years. I know others who have had theirs for 20. Small haul bags are pretty easy to find used. I got mine for less than $100 if I recall. I'd get the atom smasher for cragging. It seems to be a very good size for most cragging. I can fit a 70m rope, double rack to 6", food, and water in my small haul bag, so I imagine the slightly smaller atom smasher would be great for carying a normal amount of gear. Haul bags also can take a lot of abuse, can be thrown off cliffs, and are inexpensive. One more plus is that the atom smasher is made by Fish, which is super cool. I have the Wide Fetish Chalk bag and it is the best chalk bag I've owned. If I ever decide to get another crag pack, and purchase it new, it would be an atom smasher.

Tldr; Get the atom smasher or another used haul bag.

Curtis Baird · · Johnson City, TN · Joined Oct 2013 · Points: 344

Check out the Tower Pack made by Grade VI Mountainworks.  I have used it for two years and love it.  Handmade in Wyoming.

Live Perched · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Sep 2016 · Points: 11

The Gregory Zulu 40 replaced my 10yr old deuter 45.  

The Zulu is lighter and much more comfortable.  I has a giant stretchy pocket which can hold a helmet or two jackets.  I has only one main compartment which took getting used to since the deuter had two main compartments.   I can carry one 70mm rope and a single rack.  
I don’t think the Zulu will last 10yrs but 5yrs seems likely. I prefer 5 more comfortable years to 10 less comfortable.  
In general the “cragging climbing” packs are less comfortable than the “back packing” packs largely because weight is built into the materials and not the straps and padding.  The compromise is weight v durability v comfort.  

Christian Sperry · · Logan, UT · Joined Aug 2019 · Points: 15
Andrew Krajnik wrote:

Interesting... hadn't heard of that one. Is it hydration compatible?

It just released last fall! There's no hydration specific slot, but you could definitely find a spot for it in the front pocket.  I'll throw the link in https://www.mountainhardwear.com/crag-wagon-60-backpack-1854021.html?dwvar_1854021_variationColor=233#q=crag%2Bwagon&start=1

Christian Sperry · · Logan, UT · Joined Aug 2019 · Points: 15
Sam X wrote: Metolius sentinel would be a good choice, and more versatile than say a creek 50. Or the metolius freerider.

It will also last longer than any other pack listed on this forum. 

Christian Sperry · · Logan, UT · Joined Aug 2019 · Points: 15
Shaniac wrote: Osprey Mutant. Comes in multiple sizes, my 37L hauls weight really well. External rope carry if you need extra room. Past generations are $50 on ebay. Hauls tools and skis well. And my 37 is 2 pounds lighter than my BD Mission 50. I have been using mine for over a year now and I am sold. Certainly worth looking into. Good luck! Packs are a tough one to find a perfect fit.
https://vimeo.com/279733718

I was thinking about getting one for all my alpine missions. I use a Patagonia Ascensionist right now and I find it to be so uncomfortable with more than 15 lbs in the pack, mostly due to the raw webbing hip belt. How comfortable is the mutant with 30+ lbs?

Shaniac · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 14
Christian Sperry wrote:

I was thinking about getting one for all my alpine missions. I use a Patagonia Ascensionist right now and I find it to be so uncomfortable with more than 15 lbs in the pack, mostly due to the raw webbing hip belt. How comfortable is the mutant with 30+ lbs?

I have the mid lineage Mutant (not new but not the oldest... 37L in Small) it carries 30+ just fine. 50 lbs pushes it a bit too far, but 30 is fine. I pack a 70M, two ice tools, food, water and hardware and she does great. I am hitting Lee Vining this weekend which has a 1.5 mile uphill approach. So I will give you a full report on how it carries. What I really like about it is that it packs down really small when empty so I just climb my multi-pitch with it on, and don't have to hike back to the base.  Plus for $50 (lightly used) on ebay it was a hell of a deal. BUT... you will never see Kelly waxing poetic about the Mutant. : - )  https://youtu.be/YFEtgEKhD_4 

Christian Sperry · · Logan, UT · Joined Aug 2019 · Points: 15
Shaniac wrote:

I have the mid lineage Mutant (not new but not the oldest... 37L in Small) it carries 30+ just fine. 50 lbs pushes it a bit too far, but 30 is fine. I pack a 70M, two ice tools, food, water and hardware and she does great. I am hitting Lee Vining this weekend which has a 1.5 mile uphill approach. So I will give you a full report on how it carries. What I really like about it is that it packs down really small when empty so I just climb my multi-pitch with it on, and don't have to hike back to the base.  Plus for $50 (lightly used) on ebay it was a hell of a deal. BUT... you will never see Kelly waxing poetic about the Mutant. : - )  https://youtu.be/YFEtgEKhD_4 

Looking forward to hearing about the trip! 

Shaniac · · Unknown Hometown · Joined Jul 2016 · Points: 14
Christian Sperry wrote:

Looking forward to hearing about the trip! 

Hello, this is my report on the Osprey Mutant requested above. Ignore of you don't care. : - ) 

I used the Mutant (older version, Gen 3 I think?? 38L, it looks like this green one) going into and ice climbing in Lee Vining Canyon. I could not weigh my pack but I had a 70M 9.8mm rope, two Cassin All Mountain tools, 2L of water, all my climbing gear, spare gloves, extra layers, crampons, headlight and food all packed on/or inside. The rope was as soggy as a dog in a storm... on the way out, but that was all down hill. : - )
  The hike in is about 1.5 mile and is all up hill. Elevation 6,781 feet. You traverse across the creek several times and you have to navigate a few icy boulders depending on the snow depth.  The pack carried the weight just fine as I did not notice any shifting or carrying issues once you cinch it down and get the load lifters set right. The pack protected me from a few friendly snowballs as the crew was in a great mood as the weather was oh so FINE! (Oh the fun songs you can parody about the new Space Force when sung to the song "In the Navy" by the Village People.)
   The tool holders work well, even with the crescent shape of modern tools. I don't think I could have easily undone them with heavy gloves on, but liners give you plenty of dexterity to release the tools. Extra layers can easily be stuffed under the floating hood or in the side compression straps if it gets to hot on the slog-march uphill.
   It was not sub freezing so I just used a bladder & bite valve for water, and blew air in the line between uses. The gear clips on the waist strap proved handy when stray gear (anchors & stray quick-draws) were found during pack-up and it could easily be clipped to the bag.  A few slippery spots were encountered on the march up, but the bag held well and I only lost footing when deep post hole-ing. If that happened I just got my feet downhill and wiggled my way upright again, back onto packed snow.
   I keep being impressed with this bag after owning a used one for about a year. It has become both my summer and alpine pack. I could never afford one new... but they come up used from time to time and are well worth the money. There was a new shiny blue/black one at the ice crag and we compared the two and the only obvious difference was the new one had a slick external helmet carry... if you needed room in the sack. My older one has an expanding top that feels like it gives you plenty of extra space. Room enough for several layers of thick fleece or about three sets of crampons wrapped in a soft shell. When not in use it just rolls up and is held in place by the floating hood or the cinch top/1 inch rope strap.
   My only modification has been to add a small bladder valve hose clip to the right shoulder strap so the bite valve stays put when not in use. It clips right around the external webbing and has stayed put since installed. Holler if you have any questions. Climb safe ya'll. 
NICHOLAS MAGILL · · MANCHESTER · Joined Apr 2019 · Points: 0

I really like my BD hollow point 20l. Its a good day pack for the areas that i climb. I can fit a double rack up to a BD3, a set of nut and tri cams, big gun harness, draws, 2l bladder(filled) along with snacks for the day. The only things i cant fit is shoes, rope and helmet (that stuff i just strap to the outside.

Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

Trad Climbing
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